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14

Earlier in the episode, Claire was running through the cemetery when she was berated by a woman, who said, "You shouldn't run here, it's disgraceful. Have you no respect?" Knowing the character, Claire's pride would have been dented by having been spoken down to in public in that way. She's a person used to getting her own way. My understanding of the scene ...


11

At this point of time Rachel is terrified of Stamper. At first she followed him out of a sense of gratitude and loyalty. After all, he did help her out when she was at her lowest point, providing her with money and a place to stay. As the whole conspiracy with Peter Russo unfolded she began to see Stamper as he really was. Ruthless and manipulative. She knew ...


10

In this appearance on The Daily Show (written up here) Kevin Spacey describes how in preparation for his role of Frank Underwood in the Netflix series, Spacey said he followed both House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) and House Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.), who even invited the Hollywood star to a whip meeting... “It feels like you’re watching ...


10

While Kevin Howell is quite spot-on in his explanation of the upside down flag representing distress, I think especially his link to the Flag Code gives another, maybe even better fitting explanation. The country itself is objectively seen not in distress during the course of the show. So while the upside down flag could represent some kind of metaphorical ...


10

A flag being flown upside down is a symbol for distress. As far as the no stars I'm looking into that.


10

There are some interesting references to paper, origami, cards, etc. in House of Cards. Perhaps for Claire, it's a reference to two things - one being her suppressed creativity and how that ties in to her longing for Adam. We don't know that much about her past, except that which has been revealed through her conversations with Adam. We also learn a little ...


8

He starts walking as soon as he pushes her, and he's halfway up the stairs by the time bystanders notice she's under the train. He walks quickly but calmly, he doesn't run away. In unremarkable clothing, it isn't strange that no one stopped him. As for security systems, if you watch more of the series, you'll notice that Frank is always aware of when he is ...


8

Rachael is the call girl/prostitute that was with Peter Russo in the first episode. If you haven't finished the season, then just keep watching. Spoilers below if you finished and missed it.


8

You are right, the president is portrayed as rather naive and is mostly a puppet in the hands of Frank and Tusk. I doubt that this is a likely scenario in the real world, at least to this extent, and it is one of the very few things one could criticise on this otherwise outstanding show. However, even if it requires a little bit suspension of disbelief on ...


7

The ring probably symbolizes a simpler time for Frank. As we saw in his class reunion episode (Season 1 Episode 8), Frank was quite different and more idealistic back in school. He sang in a barbershop quartet, was in a loving relationship, and basically ran wild and rambunctious with his schoolmates. The fact that for the duration of his stay in his school ...


7

The short answer is, Frank Underwood doesn't care if the bill passes or fails. The only thing he wants is for Peter Russo to fail. The longer answer with background: Frank Underwood stated Russo was a pawn. Understand that after Frank is undermined for the Secretary position by Linda (and we later find out Tusk), he wanted something bigger and he wanted his ...


7

Initiatives like that, have a huge impact on politics. With his wife running the CWI, it makes Frank look good before the general public. If it were ever to come down to the people voting for him, people would favor somebody who supports such initiatives. It's like brownie points in politics!


7

As far as I can tell, her reason is never really explained in more detail, so we can only speculate. As she admits to Frank she killed many people through missile strikes during her time in the military, even civilians. This haunts her, but she thinks that it could not have been avoided at the time. She did what she "had to do". She does not seem to be ...


5

Another aspect to origami is that it requires precise, painstaking execution, which seems to come naturally to Claire. Like origami, she is beautiful, complicated, and controlled; given the way the plot unfolds, she may be crushable. Also, the folds and doubling-back suggests to me complexity and double-dealing. I find her very intriguing. Although I am ...


5

Cross fades and pans are more common in (low budget) television for some reason, and even more common in home video—I have my theories about the causes, but that does not affect this question. View any quality movie and you'll see that almost every cut (99+%) is a classic straight cut. For extra effect, maybe there is a fade to black or fade from ...


5

Running through the cemetary is an example of Claire pursuing an objective with utter disregard for what surrounds her. The old woman is a reality check (and maybe the beginning of a slow transformation in Claire - I'm guessing, only on ep. 3). When we see her again, she's walking in the cemetary. That in itself, is a show of respect. That she smiles at the ...


5

Opinion-based, but one of the major themes in House of Cards is control of information. The Underwoods thrive because they are able to conceal their own intentions, find out as much as possible about their targets and feed the proper information to proxies like Zoe, Stamper or Russo. Although I can't think of specific examples off the top of my head, ...


4

It has been some time since I finished the second season now, but I will try to go on what I remember: There were several reason why Walker was in a difficult position and why his opinion ratings were dropping quickly. Walker (supposedly) led the country into a growing conflict with China, which possibly could have been avoided. This also led to an energy ...


4

It's a stork. I think it foreshadows her interest in having kids. Note that she exchanges it with Russo's kids, whom she dreams about just before she shows overt interest in pregnancy.


4

I didn't see anything in the episodes (at least which jumped out) spelling this out. The way I see this helping the symbiosis is she needs to be doing something which will not interfere with anything he is doing. Being the Director of the non-profit shows her willingness to support bigger things without any interference. It's kind of like the First Lady, ...


3

From dear Wikipedia, "House of Cards is the story of Frank Underwood (Kevin Spacey), a Democrat from South Carolina's 5th congressional district and the House Majority Whip, who, after getting passed over for promotion to Secretary of State, decides to exact his revenge on those who betrayed him." -The Lincoln monument helps convey the political subject ...


3

You might reconsider the first non-answer in your list. Here is what I understood. Frank's original plan is to have Russo run for governor and only in the last minute to see him fail miserably in order for the vice president to continue the race and leave his position open. And precisely here is your answer. Russo's failure should occur only a few days ...


3

I found two things on the internet and can remember nothing which show a date in-show. The general theory goes, as Oliver_C says, that Garrett Walker was POTUS from Jan 20, 2013 to Oct 28, 2014. The alternate time-line theory says that after the Reagan presidency, things went different in Washington, but out here in the "real world" things pretty much stayed ...


2

It was Frank's feeling of betrayal at NOT being appointed Secretary of State that precipitated his Shakespearian quest to destroy his enemies. If he HAD been appointed he might have been... happy and well-adjusted. Seriously though, he does explicitly say "We are no longer bound by our allegiances." If he had been given the position he was promised he ...


2

First episode of season two shows Claire looking at the news of Barnes' death. Her momentary pause and small hand gesture indicate that she has her own thoughts about the death, most likely concerning Frank's involvement. Does she discuss them with Frank? Unlikely. It reflects their mysterious relationship. She knows, he knows, but it isn't said explicitly. ...


1

His whole deliciously Machiavellian scheme that was the meat of the first two seasons was only triggered by him feeling betrayed by the administration. So if had been appointed Secretary of State, as promised, then the plan wouldn't have been initiated. Then we enter the land of wild speculation. I'm fairly sure Underwood would never have been satisfied ...


1

But I'm sure they would have pulled the recordings leading up to the incident. Obviously that particular spot by the fence they were talking out was a blind spot but it's not rocket science to rewind footage of several different cameras and follow the individual into the blind spot for a possible ID. Regardless if Francis was wearing a hat or not they could ...


1

I wonder if the lack of stars symbolizes the power of the federal government over constituent states.


1

Coming late to HoC party, but very intrigued by the paper references. I think it can also extend into the newspapers as well. Their impermanence and the digital forms of information that now are of so much weight and importance. The significance of the origami is far reaching. It represents a childlike whimsicalness, referring to Peter's children and to ...


1

I think it may also be a representation of Claire herself. Paper on it's own is blank and undefined but once folded and manipulated it can serve a purpose as with the origami. After the photo Claire takes of the girl is first printed Adam keeps projecting what he sees onto the image, wanting to name her Claire indicating that he sees her this way. Claire ...



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