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22

Not particularly. While it is, in part, derived from European sword fighting, there are also dashes of Chinese sword theatrics (Wushu) along with exaggerated and dramatic moves designed to film well. As with hand-to-hand martial arts, actual real life fighting is a lot faster, direct and brutal. The downside is that these methods don't film well.


19

Gladiator fights have a long cultural and political history. Originally they were held on a smaller scale (than the Colosseum) and often for the purpose of honoring a deceased. Their popularity grew as the rich began to see how they could further their standing with the people. The gladiators themselves were often killed or severely injured, making it less ...


12

Your parallel is slightly off. It's not Biko that Wikus is related to but Biko's friend, Donald Woods from "Cry Freedom". Both Wikus and Woods were initially of the governing race, and both started with adversarial relationship to Biko/alien known as Christopher Johnson, only later to turn into friends.


11

According to all-knowing Wikipedia (smile): In the end, authorities pointed out that the chances of the prisoners surviving the trip across the bay were slim. At the time, there was no discovery of robberies or car thefts that could have been attributed to them, and the men were habitual criminals yet were never arrested again. The FBI officially ...


11

I don't know if it is ancient culture or not, but that necklace was given to him by his wife right before his departure for the hot gates. I believe the reason he gives it back is as a way to tell his wife he is gone.


11

This pyramid building civilization has many similarities to both the ancient Egyptian civilization and also to the civilizations of Mesopotamia (which you probably mean with Persian-like). From those two the latter is/are actually a bit older and marks the beginning of city building. But nevertheless such large buildings as the Egytian pyramids or the ...


10

This scene was meant to put a spotlight on Jobs' darker side, but the event never really happened. In a fact check, this scene was specifically mentioned: Take the movie's font scene. At an all-hands meeting, an employee dares to question Jobs’s choice of “adding pretty fonts” on the Lisa computer, the forerunner to the Macintosh, causing Jobs to fire ...


9

Basically, it wouldn't. The original Turing Machine (Or Christopher as it was named) was never programmed to identify words: it was programmed to identify consistencies. The enigma code wasn't deciphered through letters, it was deciphered through a tape displacement procedure known as its 'primitive operation' that's chosen signifiers are still honored ...


8

Absolutely. There's very little writing on the subject, which in itself could be considered evidence that it wasn't so outrageous, but we do have a lot of photographs of frontierswomen wearing trousers, most of which I can find are from the book Women in Pants: Manly Maidens, Cowgirls, and Other Renegades: Calamity Jane Professional scout and known for ...


8

It is worth bearing in mind that single handed swords did little against plate armour, they did little against maille and padding unless you landed a good solid thrust. Curved swords have almost no affect against solid armour too. I have suits of maille and plate and regualarly fight in tournaments wearing them. We have fought at full power with swords ...


6

Yes. It is even believed that the Coliseum in Rome was filled with water at times to re-enact sea battles. From the Wiki: The Colosseum could hold, it is estimated, between 50,000 and 80,000 spectators, having an average audience of some 65,000; it was used for gladiatorial contests and public spectacles such as mock sea battles, animal hunts, ...


5

Resources: Many accessible US locations are good dupes for European battlefields. It's more difficult to recreate tropical island fights or big naval battles believably and cheaply. Bias: There are fewer established Japanese actors who studios would trust as a big draw to a historical movie. Thematic content: Americans like to see themselves beating up the ...


5

As with many countries/states, the working definition of a knife that can be construed as a weapon is generally set at 4 inches: First, subdivision (b) makes it illegal to carry a knife with a blade length of four inches or more... There are exceptions both ways to this: something with a smaller blade can still be considered illegal if the intended ...


5

I found this mention on a historical website called the Cleaveland Civil War Roundtable: One mob looted and burned a block of elegant houses on Lexington Avenue near Forty-Sixth Street; another set fire to the draft office on Broadway near Twenty-Ninth Street. Other rioters extorted money or liquor from merchants or saloonkeepers. When detectives heard ...


5

I'm going to attribute it to the most powerful force in the universe -- Plot. It's a way to represent communication between Leonidas and Gorgo as well as a mechanism to 'pass the baton' to his son. I shall further speculate that it was worn as a braid rather than a necklace so as not to interfere with visual of a ripped and oily Gerard Butler jumping and ...


5

You've got good questions, but the answers are easily found with a little research. One mustn't go farther than Wikepedia.org to find answers. In Indiana, when Lincoln was nine, his mother Nancy died of milk sickness in 1818. Frederick Douglass was Lincoln's "black friend". See also the Wikipedia article for Frederick Douglass. Mary was courted by Stephen ...


5

Not really. The film's writer Peter Morgan admitted he made that part up. The way Niki met his wife was not in the way I showed it, but I said [to them], “Does it truthfully represent the nature of your relationships, the atmosphere and the vibes between you?” And they both signed off on it. It helped that Morgan's wife is Austrian and actually knew ...


4

I think the Spartans were way more brutal than it was depicted in the show. Because, the majority of the things depicted are true - the characters personalities and all of the battles and stuff, as I can believe, but it's not historically accurate as far as i know. Because it is focused on the lives of merchants and slaves, and low level magistrates and ...


4

No doubt the history of YIP man is very different with that shown in the movie IP Man. The film loosely portrayed his life. There are lots of historical inaccuracies in the movie. Like you asked about the duel, Wiki states it never happened. Another movie review also seconds this fact: After witnessing repeated Japanese brutality, Man decides that he ...


4

This review says no. While, during the war, Ip Man did indeed refuse to teach his martial arts to the military police of the occupying Japanese - a decision which eventually forced him to flee Foshan - he certainly never had, let alone won, a duel with a Japanese general (played in the film by Hiroyuki Ikeuchi). They do not cite a source for that ...


4

I am not actually a historian nor have I read the biography of J. C. Daniel by Chelangott Gopalakrishnan. But as a regular movie goer and based on my research, what I can understand is that it is a movie which has got some facts wrapped up in fiction. It appears to be an attempt influenced by the movie Harishchandrachi Factory (which was Indias official ...


4

There was certainly a connection at this time between Rome and China, through the Silk Road but there is no conclusive evidence of any similar battle... Romans were certainly traveling to China to sell their wares... but those are merchants with a few guards to protect them on their way, not an army. According to this Variety article by Maane Khatchatourian,...


4

There's no direct connection Ragnar from "The Last Kingdom" is Ragnar Ravnson. Ravn (The blind man Uhtred meets after being captured) being his father. He and his father Ravn (along with his sons, Ragnar Ragnarson and Rorik Ragnarson, and his daughter Thyra Ragnarsdottir) are fictional characters who are not claimed to be in any way related to Ragnar ...


4

It is definitely possible. This type of weapon was widely used on the Western front in the later stages of the war. American soldiers had nothing like it, and it gave the Germans a big advantage over the Americans and British in any kind of close range situation. As a captured trophy weapon it would have been highly prized. Normally soldiers do not use ...


3

Wikipeda has listed various inaccuracies as character names, relationships, historical costume, physical appearance and the timing of events. As creator Hirst noted, "Showtime commissioned me to write an entertainment, a soap opera, and not history ... And we wanted people to watch it." He added that some changes were made for production ...


3

My answer is that it represents the bond and relationship of somebody you have a deep respect, admiration, and affection for. A way to honor the blessings of somebody very special.


3

No, the movie is based on the 1957 novel "South of the Heart: a novel of modern Arabia" by Hans Ruesch. As far as I could find out the novel is not depicting any actual events or wars. The principalities "Hobeika" and "Salmaah" did not actually exist, and the conflict between them is unlikely to be based on a real one according to this german historical ...


3

If the therapy in question is Electroconvulsive therapy, then yes, it is highly possible that children were given this treatment. Despite the fact that ECT was allegedly phased out during the 60's and 70's, the treatment continued to be administered, and even gained a little popularity around 20 years ago due to its effectiveness.


3

It is clear that Union infantry and cavalry engaged the rioters in the streets, contributing to the substantial loss of life: During the Draft Riots of 1863, Union troops were called in to restore order. Here the rioters (pictured) battled Union forces along First Avenue, between 11th and 14th Streets (note the cannon firing in the background) Columbia ...



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