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6

Mooz's answer is great, I just want to look at this one part in a little more detail: Trading a dragon for 8,000 soldiers is seen as an unwise trade; an experienced trader should see this as suspicious It's a believable trade. If this had been a real trade, it'd be a classic example of the economic principle of marginal utility. One dragon is, ...


15

Kraznys mo Nakloz was not expecting what Dany did The Unsullied are a mercenary company which has existed for ~400 years[1]. Since then, they have been captured, trained, sold, repeat. There has not been a single account of the Slavers being rudely betrayed by a buyer. Kraznys mo Nakloz was an overly-confident idiot As you can hear in his dialogue with ...


6

If you don't like fairytales or the fluffy sillyness of some fantasy, and you like drama like Breaking Bad, probably you'll really enjoy Game of Thrones. It's all about a gritty, well-developed world close to the reality of what the middle ages were like, without clear lines between good or evil, with complex factions made up of many well-realised ...


19

There's very little in the way of "high" fantasy in the books or show, though the level increases a bit over time. (This increase is the reliance of fantasy elements builds organically and is even sort-of explained in-universe, which may or may not help you stay interested.) The series is primarily a type of "political/military fiction", in that they focus ...


2

There's alchemy and magic, but in small doses. Mostly sex and violence. And dragons later on. Watch a couple episodes, see if you are into it.


-1

No matter how many times I replay this series from the very beginning, there is always something I missed first time round which explains subsequent events. For what its worth, I think jealousy is the primary motive for Baelish betraying Stark - and the l-o-n-g memory of a love lost to a better man. I think the political schemes are all bound up in the ...



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