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3

This wasn't explained in the show (apart from the fact that she has been a slave), the information we have comes from the books. From GoT Wiki: In the A Song of Ice and Fire novels, Melisandre is a priestess of the red god, R'hllor, the Lord of Light, whose worship involves the idolization of fire and light. R'hllor is a popular deity in several ...


1

Sandor Clegane is a complex figure who has spent his entire life hating his brother and waiting for the day in which he would take revenge. Skin burns that he has over his face are the consequence of Greg's brutality and torture, when he was only seven years old. I don't think The Hound admired Ser Loras, neither any other knight. On the contrary, he ...


3

Just an idea - if he had NOT intervened, The Mountain had killed Loras, and therefore was maybe sentenced to death. This would have ripped The Hound from the chance to kill him himself. This seems to me a much better reason for The Hound as to save the prototype of the (from him) dispised knight. Sandor saw an opportunity to potentially kill his brother ...


4

Because Drogon was not in Meereen when she decided to chain the other two dragons and his exact whereabouts where unknown. Following Daenerys' conquest of Meereen, Drogon, who is now the size of a small ship, kills and eats the goats of a local goatherd. (...) Dany is later dismayed to learn that Drogon has killed the daughter of a goatherd. She ...


19

In the book, this fight between Ser Loras and the Mountain was semifinal, and in the other semifinal the Hound has already defeated Jamie Lannister. The Hound is supposed to face Ser Loras in the final tilt, but Loras, in gratitude to the Hound for saving his life, yields the match. The screenwriters of the show have ignored a lot of details from the book, ...


6

From Game of Thrones Wikia Weaknesses section: Shadows live very short lives, created only for the tasks they were given. Although they can become invisible, a mirror will compromise the creature's location. It is implied by Catelyn that Shadows inherit the physical features of the men who fathered them, as the Shadow that killed Renly Baratheon bore a ...


0

Stannis had only 4,000 men but the point is that he was able to capture Mance off guard. Mance is also averse to fighting battles that would lead to an inordinate number of deaths of free folk. So he wouldn't order a pyrrhic attack while surrounded by four thousand trained cavalrymen.


8

The last mention of Edmure was in Season 3 episode 10 "Mhysa". Look at us now, Tully. You're dead, your daughter's dead, your grandson's dead, your son spent his wedding night in a dungeon and I'm Lord of Riverrun. -Walder Frey There has been no further mention of him, or Blackfish, or the Tullys at all in following seasons of the show, which have ...


2

Dorne's differences have to do with its vastly different history from the rest of Westeros, due in part to its geography. Its Game of Thrones Wiki entry provides a short overview, but you won't get the full picture until you read The World of Ice & Fire : the Untold History of Westeros and the Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin, Elio Garcia, and ...


5

When Ramsay captures Theon , he converts him into Reek for following reasons:- By keeping Theon alive, he has a hostage from the Greyjoy family, who are always a threat for the 'Warden of North'. He finds a loyal friend and servant by brainwashing him. Now, Theon had some personal motivation but Reek has none. He is completely faithful to Ramsay. He can ...


7

Geography Dorne is separated from the rest of Westeros by mountains and deserts. That reduces migrations significantly. There are no other barriers like that south of the Wall. Mountains are mostly located at the coasts. It's easier to get to Dorne by ship, but that's not something everyone could afford. People living in the mountains are described as ...


11

Tautologist's answer gives evidence of possible moments of doubt - but there's also evidence he still believed Robert was his father until (at least almost) end. This is from the scene where the small council hears of the red wedding in S03 E10 (the one which ends with Tywin sending the king to bed early): TYWIN: Any man who must say, "I am the king" is ...


8

He started having doubts, which he expressed in the first episode of the second season: Having heard rumors about his parentage, he confronts his mother. She dismisses it as gossip spread by his enemies. Whether he believed her or not we simply cannot tell. In the books he is not a POV character, so we don't know what his thoughts are. However ...


0

As per Game of Thrones TV series Wikia , he starts seeing the three eyed raven in dreams after fall. Bran begins to have a recurring dream in which a three-eyed raven flies into the crypts of Winterfell. However, if fall triggers this event it is not known. But he started sleeping morea and deeply after fall, that may be one of reason. Or It may be ...


4

Prior to the fall, none of Bran's Warging nor Greensight abilities had manifested themselves. The most he had shown was a stronger than usual affinity with his (then unnamed) direwolf, which is an ability he shared with the rest of his siblings. After his fall, those abilities started to show up. The warging ability was not something unique to him. The rest ...


6

In The Climb (6th episode of season 3): Tyrion: Trying to have me killed is an odd way of saying thank you. There are two people in King’s Landing who can give an order to a Kingsguard. Did you or did you not order Ser Mandon to kill me during the Battle of the Blackwater? Cersei remains silent. Tyrion: The impulse I understand. He hates me ...


3

He started to have the dreams after the fall, when he was in a coma caused by it. From the books wikia: While Bran is comatose, an attempt is made on his life by an unnamed catspaw. (...) In the meantime, during the coma, Bran has many visions, including a hazy memory of his falling from the tower and a three-eyed crow that tells him it can teach ...


1

Other answers have already explianed why Ser Allisor got support with Night's Watch in killing Jon Snow. I will like to try to cover more of what the OP has asked, why he was killed at night instead of not allowing to enter. Some of the Night's Watch's brothers are still loyal to Jon, so there was a chance that they rebel against Allisor at that time. Or ...


1

I wouldn't say that he's the most unpredictable character... Rather he's a character whos 'purpose' hasn't been made clear yet. He seems to playing 'the long game' and keeping his cards close to his chest. At the moments the 'moves' he's making in the game don't seem to be revealing a purpose but (I suspect) that sooner or later the pieces will fall into ...


4

This is purely speculation, considering the actor didn't know anything about his character's future a year ago. BEWARE: spoilers for all of Game of Thrones in the upcoming text. Here's the problem: by the end of the third series Gendry's role was basically superfluous. Even worse, considering what would happen by the end of season five -- i.e. the death of ...


3

The Wights have no free will. Whether they also lose their memories is never explicitly stated, but we can try a guess (primarly based on the books); Othor was an experimented ranger of Castle Black during his life, he knew that the most important man there was the Lord Commander and where to find him. As a Wight, he tried to kill the Lord Commander. It ...


7

In Season 3, Episode 9, "Rains of Castamere", Bran asks Rickon and Osha to head to the Last Hearth, seat of House Umber, who are sworn to House Stark. They left in the night, separating from Bran, Hodor, Meera and Jojen. Note that Jon Umber "the Greatjon", head of House Umber, unlike in the books, is not present at the Twins during the events of the Red ...


5

It all depends on if the show follows the storyline of the books. Rickon & Bran leave each other much earlier in the books. In the second book, A Clash of Kings, Osha takes Rickon away to an unknown location immediately following Ramsay's sack of Winterfell. The fifth book, A Dance with Dragons, we are informed of Rickon's location. Theon's mute ...


2

Joffrey ordered Mandon to take care of Tyrion, as his uncle was a threat to his image and to his pride. Tyrion knew it wasn't Cersei who gave the order, as he knew she was too clever to conduct a betrayal in the open. When Cersei skirts around the question, Tyrion concludes it was Joffrey, who Cersei is disapproving of for taking such an action. This was one ...


0

There is not clear indication that they are afraid of water. However, it may be possible as we know very less about that. It seems to me that they simply because White Walker and their army of Wight had no chance of swimming and reaching the boats. Lets assume they swim and reach near boat, then also as soon as they try to ride on boat, Jon snow and ...


1

Its never explained but I assume she heard the rumors and figured it out. Dorne was no fan of the lannisters so I'm sure they loved the rumor of incests.


4

What makes you believe they stop out of fear? or to put it another way; why would the White Walkers/Undead try and swim through the water? what would they possibly hope to achieve? Any effective assault against a boat by an attack force that is in the water, swimming, is pretty implausible. The strongest swimmer would struggle to catch even a leisurely ...


4

It is not shown clearly on the TV show, however it seems like kind of common knowledge among the small council (Varys, Littlefinger) and the palace. People choose to ignore or acknowledge this based on their interest. Now Cersei is on trial for the same and Stannis also has shared this information to all the lords. She may have suspected the incestuous ...


3

While watching this scene, I always got the impression that he knew he was finished. Taking on four fully armored knights is no small feat, no matter how accomplished a swordsman you are. If he's confident that he is about to die (or at least that it's a likely possibility), it doesn't matter at all what sword he's using. His objective here is to delay ...


2

All the answers were very nice and it's much clearer now. I should only leave a comment but for the sake of completeness/clarity and to be able to quote image (some interesting notes I found on the internet as well), I'm grouping the point in a single answer. First of all, it should be made clear that the captain in the scene - who was turned down by the ...


7

For question #2, for a brief moment you can see that the man is holding a map of Valyria. Presumably this sailor was taking the route through and near the Doom of Valyria, which is generally considered cursed by the majority of people in Essos and Westeros. It would be perfectly normal for the thin man to believe this superstition, giving him reason enough ...


2

This is with reference to the book. She wanted to find a way by which she could kill him and no one else without getting caught. It took her three days to find a way. “The guards go with him even when he slips out to make water,” she said, “but he doesn’t go when they do. The tall one is the quicker. I’ll wait till he is making water, walk into the soup ...


14

TL;DR She wasn't observing him to decide his guilt, but to find out the best way to kill him Longer Version: When Maybe-Jaqen asks Arya what she saw while observing the Thin Man, he wasn't asking if proof of his guilt was found, but rather what his daily routines were. The Faceless Men, as @Reyssor pointed out, are not vigilantes out to right the wrongs ...


1

Gendry, he is the only son (bastard) of Robert Baratheon alive. We don't know where he is but he seems to be the only legislative claim of Baratheon descent. That was the only fear of Joffery which made him kill all the bastards to eliminate any such claim. Other claims are just going to raise opinions, like Starks deserve it because they were also ...


8

You forget Tommen Baratheon who is still alive. We know he is not Robert's biological son but legally and publicly this doesn't change the situation; he is the heir and now head of the house and the throne. If this question is about the legal claim to the throne: Robert's probably was weak too, he got it by force. Power is power. The same is true for the ...


3

While it all sounds very unfair the principal behind it was something called judicium dei. Medieval people were very superstitious/religious and believed God decided the outcome of battles. This meant that when someone won a battle, they hadn't just seized physical control, but proved that God agreed with their goals. They used this belief as a way to 'ask ...


-1

Like the other answers said, there are actual historical versions of trial by combat and trial by combat could indeed limit bloodshed when the alternative was a blood feud or pitched battle. It does not look logical if someone like the Mountain, Barristan or Oberyn Martell can do any crime and can easily ask for trial by combat. Modern justice systems ...


4

The other answers are quite good and on-the-mark, but I want to bring the spotlight on a specific point: Yes, trial-by-combat existed in our world. But was not a case of "might makes right". If your guilt could be proven, you could not claim trial-by-combat: This was reserved for cases with a severe accusation, but no proof whatsoever. So what are we ...


10

Other, older movies and stories. Ivanhoe (1952) Our depiction of the medieval era is skewed, beginning with the names we use for it (medieval era or dark ages). In the great heyday of history in the late 19th and early 20th century a lot of the research wasn't very accurate, and not only by today's standards. A lot of wrong reconstructions were made, and ...


0

Littlefinger wants to spy on Tyrion. Littlefinger tells his prostitutes to give Pod freebies any time he wants and to tell him that he is the best they have ever had. Pod visits the prostitutes and Littlefinger gets to hear what Pod tells the prostitutes. It is not likely that Pod, a virgin, would be such a good lover that the prostitutes would be giving ...


27

It's not only inspired, but almost identical to a Western European medieval custom. Trial by combat (also wager of battle, trial by battle or judicial duel) was a method of Germanic law to settle accusations in the absence of witnesses or a confession in which two parties in dispute fought in single combat; the winner of the fight was proclaimed to ...


1

In universe: It is a fantasy show, not a show depicting a realistic medieval setting. It orients on the (mostly) European medieval times (the imagination of which that most people have is in itself largely an invention by novelists and romanticists), but huge parts are altered and sometimes not very believable, including measurements, distances, time spans, ...


3

This is somewhat uncommon, especially to use the names of both the mother and father's house. However; my knowledge is mostly in England and the UK. I know that James I of England took his mother (Mary Queen of Scots) house name of Stuart, but his father was regent only and was a complete scoundrel. However, Mary Queen of Scots kept her house name of ...



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