Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

61

TL;DR: There are a number of things that change him, but the defining moments are: Meeting Brienne Losing his hand Opening up to someone (Brienne) about why he killed the Mad King These completely and totally change his character and make him determined to redeem his honour (which he himself defines) in any way that he can. Long Answer: There are a ...


29

According to the Game of Thrones Wiki page about Valyrian steel: Valyrian steel is recognizable from its sharpness, as well as a distinctive rippled pattern visible in blades made from it While it's hard to detect sharpness from eyesight alone, the "distinctive rippled pattern" can be detected easily by those who know where to look for it. Couple of ...


26

The books are just as graphic (and perhaps more so) than the show. Just keep reading. In fact, way before the TV show was a reality, the books' author had stated frequently that if his series was ever to be turned into a TV show that only HBO could do it, because they wouldn't cut out the whole lot of sex and violence that are in the books. True, there are a ...


26

@Shadow Wizard's answer is correct as per the TV-Show. I'd like to add the books' description of the blades which may help to identify how people can instantly recognise the Valyrian Steel blades. This is Bran's description of Ice (the ancestral sword of House Stark): “Ice,” that sword was called. It was as wide across as a man’s hand, and taller even ...


25

Mance Rayder in intending to move the entire Wilding population south to avoid the oncoming winter, which is presumed by many to be likely to be long, and accompanied by the reappearance of 'the others'. He has an army estimated as 100,000 strong. The remaining other forts along the wall are deserted yes, but its also presumed that the tunnels through the ...


25

Good question! I'm not entirely sure how it's portrayed in the final episode, but to take knowledge from the books, he simply sailed north of the wall and his army marched from there. The wall extends across the entire land, but it's certainly possible to sail north or south of it. According to the books, the orange arrow is where he landed: He leaves ...


22

Peter Beaelish wants one thing: power. He is the son of a very minor lord with very poor holdings. He grew up seeing the love of his life get married to someone else with a more powerful family name. He knows that he can never actually rule in name, but he wants to be at least the real power behind the throne. For that to happen he needs to setup a puppet ...


22

Orson kills beetles. The Mountain kills women and children. In fact, a good many people around Tyrion are killers. Even his brother Jaime who's, at this point, generally considered to be a good dude totally pushed a kid out a window and had all of Ned's servants killed in S1. Tyrion could not understand the beetle murder habit of Orson's because Tyrion ...


21

Not particularly. While it is, in part, derived from European sword fighting, there are also dashes of Chinese sword theatrics ([Wushu][1]) along with exaggerated and dramatic moves designed to film well. As with hand-to-hand martial arts, actual real life fighting is a lot faster, direct and brutal. The downside is that these methods don't film well.


20

I have not yet gotten the chance to watch the series on TV but I have read the books and without any spoilers from beyond the first book here is the purpose for the tunnel in the wall. First of all the wall is over 900 ft high that has been built by both man and some magical help. IIRC the tunnel was cut into the wall to create that path to the other side ...


19

This is a great question. Here's my take on it: Towards the end of Season 1, Ned Stark is arrested in King's Landing. Incensed by this, Robb raises his bannermen to march on the South. When Ned is killed, he reaches a point of no return and vows revenge. Then, in the Season 1 finale Fire and Blood, we hear this speech: Robb: Renly is not the King. ...


18

Now, it may very well have been just your good old fashioned MacGuffin, HOWEVER on closer inspection of the scene at the end. You never actually see Sam or the mounted White Walker make eye contact. It is cleverly implied. Sam clearly hears the hooves padding through the snow and hears the rattling chains and the White Walker looks off to the left and then ...


18

I'm not sure if it's as clear in the TV show (it's been a while since I watched season 1), but in the book it's spelled out pretty clearly that Robert was supposed to die on the hunt. Queen Cersei gives Lancel Lannister (Robert's squire) very strong wine for Robert to drink, with the instruction that Robert should get as drunk as possible and have some kind ...


18

When Halfhand and Jon Snow are the lone survivors of their patrol and are captured by the wildlings, Halfhand orders Jon Snow to defect. The scene which you are questioning is where the actual deed transpires. Halfhand knows that once they reach the Wildling's camp, both of them will be killed or worse, first tortured and then killed. He can also sense that ...


17

Actors are usually hired if they fit the role they are supposed to play. In case of GOT, some of the characters can be visualized with existing actors. As you can notice, none of the star or lead characters (Jon Snow, Arya Stark, Daenerys etc.) are known faces. Senior actors are roped in because they either fit the role or lend some good acting in the ...


17

It's never spelled out in the show (and the incident never happened in the books) so we are left to speculate. We also need to remember that there were two people here (Arya and Sandor) and they might have different reasons for doing what they did. Possible Sandor motives: His initial desire was to ransom Arya back to her family. Robb and her mother died ...


17

Several reasons: Unlike the Baratheon/Tyrell alliance, there is no single person that could be assassinated and have any lasting effect. Kill Joffrey? He still has an heir. Kill Tyrion? Any number of commanders loyal to the Lannisters can rise to the cause. So on and so forth. Kill Cersei? Tyrion and the realm would've thanked him. Unlike the ...


16

The animators worked out four different map sequences, which can effectively indicate the locations shown in the upcoming episode. The initial plan was to show the map every time the scene changed, but this was deemed too disruptive to the storyline, and it was decided to introduce the locations in the title sequence instead. The article can be found ...


16

Partly, it's miles away - not something southerners think about. He's far too cynical for solemn vows, and too much of an independent-minded loner to choose to huddle for warmth with hundreds of 'brothers'. But mostly, it'd be unthinkable due to pride: Except among the Starks, taking the black is associated with failure or disgrace. The only southerners who ...


15

Personally I don't think the show would be worth watching without the sex and violence, but that might just be me. To actually answer your question though I think many of the sex scenes actually establish character and subtleties of plot, and the same might also be said of the violence. According to Here be Geeks about 2-3 minutes have been cut from each ...


15

From Wikipedia: Some [TV-] shows have a small stable of directors, but also usually rely on outside directors. Given the time constraints of broadcasting, a single show might have two or three episodes in pre-production, one or two episodes in principal photography, and a few more in various stages of post-production. The task of directing is ...


15

White Walkers (or Others as they are also called in the books) are magical beings that live in the freezing lands north of the Wall. The last time they were seen by humanity was 8000 years before the Conquest. What little is known of them is mixed up with legends and half forgotten stories. Most people still believe that they are a myth and are just scary ...


15

In the show, it is not explicitly explained how Joffrey was poisoned. Whether it was the wine or the cake. But in S04E06, Pycell presents Sansa's necklace as a proof in the trial against Tyrion. Since Sansa was wearing the necklace throughout the wedding & nobody but Olenna goes up near her for a small talk, there would be no time to mix the poison in ...


14

You're asking a colossal question. This link will guide you through all the possible answers to that question. Do note, there are major spoilers afoot there. To summarise some of the possible information: In the books, we are presented initially with the idea that Ashara Dayne is his mother. According to Ser Barristan Selmy, a Stark bedded her at a ...


14

Actually I see it as a veiled putdown on Orson Scott Card who has been criticizing Game of Thrones series. Cousin Orson is Orson Scott Card, also realize that Orson Scott Card is widely known for writing Ender's Game, a novel about a boy who is selected to kill an Alien Race of Bugs aka Beetles. If the writer's had this in mind they made an excellent jest of ...


14

Do you mean The Rains of Castamere? The Rains of Castamere is a famous song in Westeros... [It] immortalized the destruction of House Reyne by Tywin Lannister. The Rains of Castemere went on to become very popular with soldiers of the Westerlands, becoming an "anthem" of sorts for House Lannister. This extends to the point that even Western ...


14

There are a few interpretations of this scene. She may have bonded with him more, but he was still a monster to her. He was one of the names she recited at night, ensuring she never forgot him or his atrocious crimes. He killed the little butcher's boy she played with all the way back in Season 1. By being so close to Joffrey, he was also "part" of what ...


14

I can immediately see that our opinions on this differ somewhat, so I'm not neccesarily expecting the thumbs up, but I'll try to outline some of the main points about adaptation: in this case, from the Book to the TV Show. Firstly, you should know, the process of adapting original work is such a common part of TV/Movie making it is its own profession. It ...


14

From io9.com/ Not to worry though, in the event that they do catch up, the show's creators are prepared. Benioff reveals, "Last year we went out to Santa Fe for a week to sit down with him [Martin] and just talk through where things are going, because we don't know if we are going to catch up and where exactly that would be. If you know the ...


13

I believe, Sandor was basically a good man and he was obeying Joffrey, only because he was bound by his sense of duty. Besides, Sandor had a past with fire. In one of the episodes from season 1, we learn that when Sandor was a kid, his elder brother shoved his face into fire and hence the burn marks on his face. Now, during the battle with Stanis, initially ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible