Hot answers tagged

64

In the documentary "The Greatest Movie Ever Sold" (a film specifically about the topic of product placement), director Morgan Spurlock notes that one of the first recognized product placements was in the 1919 Roscoe Arbuckle comedy The Garage, in which a Red Crown Gasoline logo was displayed on screen. I expect watching the documentary would more than ...


53

I have unashamedly copied a paragraph from this rather comprehensive article covering tinnitus as a movie trope - The Cine-Files - The Tinnitus Trope: Acoustic Trauma In Narrative Film They are discussing silence vs. whistling noise/ringing in ears [tinnitus] ...although Arthur Hiller’s The Out of Towners utilized the effect as early as 1970, ...


37

The use of death-traps far pre-dates films and TV series, dating back to novels and theatrical productions. Take the Sherlock Holmes story The Adventure of the Engineer's Thumb [1892]. To quote from a wiki on the subject: The engineer Victor Hatherley is trapped inside a hydraulic press which would crush him to a pulp. Escape method: a woman ...


23

Do you define bullet time as slow motion bullet dodging, or the spinny effect from multiple cameras in an arc? There's a slow motion scene in the first Blade film where you can see the bullets moving through the air, giving the target enough time to reacting and move out of way. Blade came out in 1998, a year before The Matrix. It's in the scene in ...


23

The Three Musketeers When Alexander Salkind and his son Ilya produced The Three Musketeers in 1973 they shot so much footage that they decided to split it into two movies: The Four Musketeers (1974). This had ramifications and resulted in the Salkind Clause: For their daring, the Salkinds have gone down in legal history: actors' agents and ...


21

French gentleman thief Arsène Lupin battles the English detective Sherlock Holmes in the 1910 German drama film serial Arsène Lupin contra Sherlock Holmes. Wikipedia says: A contemporary of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Maurice Leblanc (1864–1941) was the creator of the character of gentleman thief Arsène Lupin who, in Francophone countries, has enjoyed a ...


21

A lot of people seem to think Juggernaut is the earliest film to use the "wire dilemma" trope. I found references to it everywhere from Amazon reviews to rap lyrics. Slightly more reliable references include: Movies you should own: Juggernaut (Terror on the Britannic) The first film to develop the 'red wire/blue wire' dilemma, it's a tense piece ...


20

Since your question asks What is the first crossover movie? I'll submit two of the earliest I have found, depending on your definition of "crossover". For movie horror/sci-fi franchises, there is Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man (1943). But I think the earliest could be Laurel and Hardy's appearance in the Our Gang comedy short Wild Poses (1933). Both Our ...


20

How does Daniel in the lions' den sound, for a Biblical example of exactly this trope?


19

It's quite a rare occurrence, with two major exceptions: comedies and factual programmes. Comedy remakes: Red Dwarf which was remade in the USA (one pilot episode) with Robert Llewellyn as Kryten in both versions, and he was also joined by the original series writers, Rob Grant and Doug Naylor. The IT Crowd also suffered a US pilot in which Richard Ayoade ...


17

According to IMDb there are only 17 movies (including shorts) that uses this rolling down credits technique, the earliest being just the one you used as example: Kiss Me Deadly (1955). In the list of movies that match this request there's also, as you mentioned, Seven (1999). Recently, the movie Next (2007) used this approach, making it the last to do so ...


17

The link in Neil Baker's comment to Luke McKernan's "Tied to the tracks" article also gives a very detailed history of a woman being tied to the tracks, occasionally by the evil villain twirling his moustache. And all those who do know silent films know that such scenes were hackneyed even before films were invented, and the few films that did show them ...


16

This made me think of an 1913 movie that Mack Sennett made called Barney Oldfield's Race for a Life. If I recall correctly, this film featured not only a mustachioed villain, but a woman tied to the train tracks! Possibly the earliest version.


16

Francis the Talking Mule first appeared on film in 1950: This pre-dates Mister Ed's TV debut by a decade. Notes: 1. The Wizard of Oz featured a talking lion in 1939, but that was obviously an actor in a costume so I assume we're not going to count it. 2. You might be able to find an earlier film with a talking parrot if ...


16

The earliest Disney animated movie I can find is Sleeping Beauty, from 1959, which shows the Dragon being slain by a sword, showing some blood. I found this picture, I see no reason why this picture is not genuine... In live action movies, in 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea (1954), Captain Nemo (played by James Mason) is shot whilst boarding the Nautilus. ...


15

I would think Alien vs. Predator would be an example of combining franchises, which was released in 2004. While not a critical success (garnered only 22% Tomatometer), it did gross $80.2 million. It even spawned a sequel, Aliens vs. Predator: Requiem in 2007.


15

Happened across this very nifty video series on film analysis, and the creator actually has an entire video devoted to the art of depicting text messages (and computer messages in general) on-screen. His video indicates that the earliest film he could find that depicts on-screen text messaging is All About Lily Chou-Chou, a Japanese film from 2001. A more ...


15

Spaceballs (1987) has this scene, in which the villains watch... Spaceballs, including the scene they're currently in. Even at YouTube image quality, you can see at least three levels on the screen — and, of course, the number of implied levels is infinite. (The two-level version shows up as early as Buster Keaton's Sherlock, Jr. (1924), so I'm sure ...


14

It's important to note the sociological underpinnings of the high school film. From 1900 throughout the 1920s, most Americans lived in small rural communities. They usually only had one school, and by the time children were of high school age, they were usually working on the family farm or apprenticed to a vocation. Thus, there was no "stereotypical" high ...


14

No. German actor Andreas Wisniewski starred in both franchises (and in Die Hard!). He is best known for his portrayal of Necros in the 1987 Bond film The Living Daylights and as Max's henchman in the 1996 blockbuster Mission: Impossible, and as one of Hans Gruber's (Alan Rickman) henchmen, Tony, in the 1988 blockbuster Die Hard. Update: Actress ...


13

I think you'd be hard pressed to find any evidence of a cliche 80s montage earlier than the one from Rocky in 1976. Obviously the idea of a montage wasn't new, nor even the idea of a training montage, but Rocky did combine those two elements with cheesy inspirational synth music, and that precise style was imitated in underdog action films ad nauseum ...


13

The wikipedia page regarding alternate ending explained that: In movies, alternate endings are often filmed before being scrapped, and may be subsequently included as a special feature in the film's DVD release. These alternate endings are a special type of deleted scene. In other cases, ideas that were presented but discarded early on are alluded to by ...


13

The oldest I know is "The Great Train Robbery" (1903). There is a youtube clip, see scene 4, approx. in minute 4ff There are more information about the film at: Wikipedia IMDB


12

As mentioned in the Wikipedia article on narrative uses of flashbacks: An extremely convoluted story may contain flashbacks within flashbacks within flashbacks, as in Six Degrees of Separation (1993), Passage to Marseille (1944), and The Locket (1946). This technique is a hallmark of Kannada movie director Upendra whose futuristic flick Super (2010) is ...


12

The record for most extras is with 1982 classic Gandhi, which used over 300,000 extras for the funeral scene. IMDb Trivia snippet: 300,000 extras appeared in the funeral sequence. About 200,000 were volunteers and 94,560 were paid a small fee (under contract). The sequence was filmed on 31st Jan 1981, the 33rd anniversary of Mohandas K. Gandhi's ...


12

Definition: parody a musical, literary, or other composition that mimics the style of another composer, author, etc, in a humorous or satirical way. I would nominate the Laurel and Hardy movies as parodies of the originals. Movies were still in their infancy when Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy created shorts and full length feature films in the 1920s with ...


11

I realize I'm ludicrously late for this, but the very first parody film was The Little Train Robbery, made in 1905. It was a parody of The Great Train Robbery, made in 1903, which had the same director.


11

Amos and Andy ran from 1951 - 1953. It is credited as the first black sit-com. It was a spin off of a radio show that started in 1928.


11

Lady in the Lake (1947) was a film noir shot entirely in the first person POV, with the exception of 2 scenes where the protagonist broke the fourth wall to address the audience directly. Taken from the Raymond Chandler novel of the same name, it was adapted to the screen and directed by Robert Montgomery, who also "starred" as the character Phillip ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible