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0

Depends on what you mean by 'cope'. In terms of retaining talent, that's what contracts or for. We pay you X for you to commit to X number of seasons. In terms of dealing with the story, that's what writers are for. Someone leaves the show? That's on the writers to 'fix'. In terms of the investment, most productions of any size take out insurance to ...


3

There have been various ways of coping that I know of for movies/movie series at least... Change the story or the focus of the story (as they did with The Dark Knight Rises, since having the Joker in that third installment wasn't exactly practical anymore.) Just change actors and either ignore it (Dumbledore in the Harry Potter series) or attempt to give ...


0

No, that one is not possible. Knowing the limitations of current mask technology, it's not possible to simply have a one-piece, pull-it-all-off mask to reveal everything... but let's assume for a moment that we CAN have that. The Nose of the underlying man is much wider than the mask. Putting a mask on would just make it even larger. One cannot simply ...


3

There's a Post online exists similar to your question. How Tom Cruise Did That Insane Plane Stunt For Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation How did this stunt actually get done? The star and director Christopher McQuarrie have revealed all in a recent interview. The filmmaker explained, "While searching for different locations, the ...


1

As someone who does community theatre and has certain emotional triggers, I really channel into the things that set me off and work with them. The best one is songs, songs that are sad and that I know make me cry. I listen to them a few hours before going on stage and during my performance, replay the song in my head and relate it to how my character is ...


1

Are you sure she wasn't just CGI'd into the scene? Also, could use chains to keep the lions at a specified position, with room for her to be between them and not in danger, then process the chains out of the images. Also, full lions are sedate lions ... feed them before hand and shouldn't be an issue. (NOTE: I'm not a movie making expert, so don't know this ...


5

The closest similarity between film and digital resolution is the comparison of film grain to pixel resolution. Digital photography does not exhibit film grain, since there is no film for any grain to exist within. In digital cameras, the closest physical equivalents of film grains are the individual elements of the image sensor (e.g. CCD cell), the ...


3

As film is analog, it has no actual resolution in the same sense as a digital file (as you hint at). Opinions vary on what the 'equivalency' would be. This discussion on Red forums comes to a semi-concensus that it's equivalent to 'around 4k' when we take into real world conditions.


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Boxing is even less accurate representation of real life than movies. In fact, everything possible is done to prolong the match. Boxers are both trained and equipped to stay conscious as long as possible. Because sport is a show, and longer shows can be priced higher. On the other hand, movies are like playing roulete with remote-controlled dices. For the ...


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I'm gonna have to go against the grain here. As someone who has trained boxing for years, no, it's not even close. It is extremely hard to do in real life, and people don't stay down more than a few seconds. In my entire boxing "career", I've taken thousands of blows, and I've never lost consciousness. I've hit other people thousands of times, and only like ...


1

Many actors can turn tears on and off at will. Others struggle with it and need the right kind of assistance and sometimes get it. Jackie Cooper (1922-2011) in Please Don't Shoot My Dog (1982) tells how they pretended to shoot his dog to get him to cry for a scene in Skippy (1931). David Hollander (born 1969) told how once when he was too happy to do a ...


0

I installed the phone lines used on location for the movie "The Rock," and I can tell you with near absolute certainty that the guns used there were real. I know this because on one trip out to the island the guns being used were also being shipped. Had I not already had my location pass, ID, etc. (and the boat and movie crew knew me), I would not have ...


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Yes it is and there are multiple evidence of that on youtube, like these: , ...


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Yes. Source: Personal experience. A relative was extremely irate with myself, and had been throwing punches at me for about 20 minutes. I had finally had enough and jabbed his bottom jaw towards the front. (If you feel on your own jaw, and you are not too overweight you should feel an area somewhat less padded, and sensitive than the rest.) He dropped, and ...


5

Easy vs. Possible. Is it possible. Yes. Even with relatively minimal training it is a fairly simple matter to teach someone to transfer enough energy through a strike to cause unconsciousness. Is it easy? No. Transferring that much energy requires, among other things, striking through the target. If you watch beginning karate students attempting to break ...


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Is it possible? Yes. Have I seen it? Yes. There is one huge bit of information missing from all of these answers; boxers use padded gloves. Now, they have tape underneath to add impact to the punch, but the gloves are padded and a well-trained boxer knows how to protect himself and reduce the impact of the blow. A street fight is bare-knuckles, and ...


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I think as a general rule, audiences need something to "happen" every 3 seconds or so. You can do this by scriptwriting something every 3 seconds... something interesting, and cutting only when it's difficult to orchestrate multiple stunts/happenings in the same shot (Indiana Jones). Or you can kind've cheat by cutting to a new view every few seconds, which ...


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There are several issues here in comparing real life to movies. A trained person knows how and where to strike for maximum damage and this person can definitely knock someone out with one blow. It may seem simple but it takes a lot of practice to develop an accurate punch. The average person might know to aim for the temple but not strike there for a many ...


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Disclaimer: Violence is stupid and dangerous. A blow to the skull is often fatal. I wouldn't say it's easy, but there are several sweet spots on the skull that, when hit with sufficient force, is almost guaranteed to cause unconsciousness. I would suggest the upper part of the jaw bone or the temple. Both places are connected to the brain stem through ...


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It is possible knock someone out with one punch. Searching on Youtube for "One punch knockout" gives you many results (also in boxing). An example. (warning, contains violence and some may be fake.) The spot where someone is hit is important though, but it is definitely possible; whether it is easy depends on how well the person hitting and the person being ...


2

This is not an exhaustive list but it is a start. First off, remember that studios don't necessarily care if you watch their film again but they definitely want you to buy their film again... I'm looking at you, copy of Shindler's List just sitting on the shelf after 15 years, still in the original plastic. OMG Special Features!!!@! One of the most obvious ...


2

Well, the most simplest is the core of all entertainment. Entertainment is about evoking emotions in the consumer. It can be pride for solving a puzzle or something else, but usually the emotional situation is simply presented and you watch (or read in books) about it. So if you watch 'Hotaru no haka' (Grave of the fireflies) you probably will feel always ...



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