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4

I think that what you're missing is that you need to be comparing Blu-ray to DVDs, not to film... Of course film is better quality than Blu-ray but the average person isn't watching a movie at home using a film projector. The older films would have been originally sold on DVDs (or even VHS tapes) that were geared for display on largely non-HD flat screen ...


1

I would say it's for the viewer. It allows you to see the change and prepare for it. As weird as it is I feel it would be even more strange and less believable if the head was still and just changed in front of you eyes.


11

Yes, both of them did their own singing for the movie. Ewan McGregor is quoted in this MTV article talking about the pressure that he felt, as it was more singing than he had done previously for parts, and touching on some of the singing training that they did specifically for the movie, and this excerpt from Nicole Kidman pays tribute to how she felt about ...


11

Lady in the Lake (1947) was a film noir shot entirely in the first person POV, with the exception of 2 scenes where the protagonist broke the fourth wall to address the audience directly. Taken from the Raymond Chandler novel of the same name, it was adapted to the screen and directed by Robert Montgomery, who also "starred" as the character Phillip ...


-1

This darker house isn't the one in the movie! I studied Farnsworth house and know it by heart. And the Fox river floods the area sometimes. I think they did on computer, but inspired by the real situation of the flooding.


20

Most of what I can find about why Easter eggs exist are related to easter eggs in computer software, but they apply equally well to movies: To be entertaining to find By and large they're pretty small, but that doesn't really matter, because they serve a very important purpose: first, they're entertaining to find (I love it when I stumble across them in ...


7

It is very similar and I thought the same thing when I watched it. But I found this article, which explains that, while closely modelled after it, it's not the real Farnsworth house, but a newly constructred house in Orion Township, Michigan about 40 miles north of Detroit. Which also answers the question about the lake location, as it was constructed ...


2

Here's a YouTube video which shows behind the scene footage. It doesn't go so far as to show the entering of the building through the window. However, it does show at the start of the clip that Tom exits the building through a removed window. I think it's pretty safe to assume it was set up that way for that final part of the scene.


1

Look at the gun. Look at how: It is spinning while staying at the exact same place of the table. Even in the third spin, when Walter doesn't even look at it, it does not skip, it does not slide sideways even a bit. It is spinning around a point somewhere behind the drum. A point at which the gun shouldn't even be touching the table, let alone it being the ...


-2

re tom's comments on the fisher booms - they cost about 40 grand, they're absolutely enormous and very heavy and difficult to move about on anything but a polished, smooth and level tv studio floor - making them next to useless for location work, though still the favourite for soaps and studio comedy like sitcoms. they are very very difficult to operate - I ...


1

Firstly the assumption about it being tiring actually isn't that accurate. Boom operators with some years of experience can quite happily swing a pole for 5 minutes at a time with a break in between (to reset the shot) all day - lots of it is technique and using the correct muscles and posture in your arms and core and learning how to move between these ...


7

Interesting article on it. The stunt first required Cruise to jump off a 120-foot ledge (the bottom was all CGI, but he really did the jump). Then, in an underwater set that was filled 20 feet high with water, Cruise had to hold his breath as he acted out the scene. Basically, he did all that scene underwater. It was mostly practical with some ...


9

There was a brief behind-the-scenes snippet from that scene during the Academy Awards, when they were announcing the nominees for Best Visual Effects. It appears that a fake horse and a blue screen were used. There's a copy of the ceremony on YouTube, but the video quality is very poor. The snippet begins at 43m18s.


20

The horse-off-the-cliff scene was created with the help of Industrial Light & Magic per this interview with the film's visual effects supervisor. This clip (which I believe was aired during Academy Awards) shows a brief glimpse of how the scene was put together. Essentially, a stunt man rode a motorized mock-up horse over an embankment and jumped off, ...


3

Licensing a known property such as Apple's Siri is a time-consuming and potentially expensive proposition for any show. The fact that you then want it to exclusively do things that Siri can't do (operating and running a smart household, acting as a counsellor for Castle, interrupting would-be murderers) makes that doubly difficult. Siri is basically a ...



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