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2

Shots like this used to be prohibitively expensive because they required helicopters. Now, amateur filmmakers can use miniature helicopters with HD video cameras mounted on them. The results are pretty great! You would need to make sure that the video quality and color matches the rest of your film, of course, but you can fix a lot of that in post ...


5

I don't know for sure, but I highly suspect those were created in a studio. There are 2 main reasons: The lighting is consistent. In the real world, the sun moves across the sky and shadows follow it. Clouds make intermittent shadows. The intensity of light changes at different times of day - dawn, noon, sunset, night. (I suppose that the filmmakers ...


6

Zooms draw attention to the camera. Frequently, the camera in a film is similar to what an observer's eyes would do: If there are 2 people talking, we look back and forth between them (like the shot cutting from one person's face to the other's and back to the first). When an important person is walking across our field of view, we follow them smoothly ...


3

To be accurate - having the camera follow isn't a "pan" - a pan is a rotation on an axis. If the camera is moved, it falls more into a "dolly" or "tracking" (crane, truck, steadicam). See this link for some good definitions. Director Paul Thomas Anderson (Boogie Nights, There Will be Blood) utilizes tracking shots frequently. Zoom shots are usually ...


0

This was definitely done in the movie Cube or one of its sequel/prequels; in fact a character opened a door and saw the back of his head looking out of the door from across the room. While not in a movie, the first time I saw/read it used was in the old Wang Computer game Colossal Cave Adventure. It was a text-based game, and in it there was a maze where ...


4

If you are a local spectator you can't zoom, you only can go closer. So it wouldn't be natural. Maybe a viewer will get unconfortable by watching a lot of zooming scenes.


0

A zoom is technically not a camera move as it does not require the camera itself to move at all. Zooming means altering the focal length of the lens to give the illusion of moving closer to or further away from the action. The effect is not quite the same though. Zooming is effectively magnifying a part of the image, while moving the camera creates a ...


0

You want to see something that will really bake your noodle? The Hitchiker's Guide To The Galaxy was apparently only released in reformatted versions: Why the very different release formats for Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy? Anyway, movies are distributed in various formats, because TVs exist in various formats. Take a look at this article to see ...


-3

I think the actors suck the smoke only into their mouths, but not into their lungs so it doesn't do damage to the lungs.


2

A number of techniques were involved for the portrayal of a normal man as a dwarf on the screen. For some shots the actor folded hi legs from feet to knees. For some static scenes his legs were hidden inside a trench. Special shoes had to be used when the character was shown walking. The movie's director has explained it all here.


0

Since the people actually knowing much more about this than me seem largely reluctant to put it into any answer, I'll give it a first try by linking to some external resources that might give some insight into the matter. First of all the movie itself was shot on a mixture of 65mm IMAX film and 35mm film. The official site of the movie gives some further ...


8

It's done using a green screen, with LOTS of shots overlaid on top of one another. Here's an awesome, short example, from DirecTV, showing how they did this for a commercial featuring a fireman falling through a roof (with a man walking around the "frozen" scene): ...



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