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From the words of Cinematographer, Janusz Kaminski “I was ecstatic to be working with Steven, and yet when we began filming it brought home the sickening reality of the Holocaust. The newsreel quality of the black and white seemed to fade the barriers of time, making [the footage] feel like an ongoing horror that I was witnessing firsthand. I ...


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Director Ron Howard describes other techniques in his commentary for Apollo 13 for simulating weightlessness in scenes shot on the soundstage. The actors often sat one one end of a see-saw which was weighted on the other end, allowing them to bob up and down smoothly. Other simple camera tricks were used, such as having the actors lay down on their sides ...


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This is a fairly common tactic that you'll actually see in a lot of films - muting/otherwise downplaying the background chatter that you'd normally hear in a certain scenario (e.g. in a restaurant, at a party, etc) so that the film (and its viewers) can focus on the characters and conversation(s) that are actually important/relevant. You've probably ...


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Sound effects are usually added and sometimes even voice. Normal fight sounds completely different and actors usually do not hit anyone.


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Maybe I'm misunderstanding your question but wouldn't this actually be a case of using open matte? Using your formatting style it would look like this: ********************************************* * 4:3 (for home release) * * * * * * ...


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Film tape in camera can have more than 4K resolution, even double. Old movies, that were filmed with film cameras only, are edited specially for aspect ratio needed, can be any you mentioned. 3D animation for movie can be rendered up to 8K and than transferred to film.


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Part of the reason so few films use zooms is very simple... Most directors/DPs shoot with "prime" lenses... which don't zoom. Prime lenses (or fixed focal length lenses) can’t zoom in or zoom out. Therefore, when using a prime, every time the filmmaker wants to get tighter on his composition, he can either (1) physically move the camera closer to his ...


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It's a technique called silver retention, also known as bleach bypass. To quote from Cinematography: Theory and Practice : Imagemaking for Cinematographers and Directors: Deluxe, another film lab with a long history in Hollywood, uses a process called Color Contrast Enhancement (or CCE). CCE raises the contrast, deepens the blacks, and adds grain ...


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I read a fascinating blog article at Premium Beat where the writer stated: The very wide aspect of 2.39:1 makes it appealing to so many filmmakers. Just about anything will look more cinematic or more ‘filmic’ when shot in this aspect, considering that originally it was associated with the anamorphic/cinemascope look and we are trained to ...


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you can see in this pic They first created a prosthetic chest over his real chest and spray tanned it to match his original skin tone. Then they put in his "heart" so it would look like it's actually a hole in his chest while his actual chest is underneath it.


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Richard has done a great job of explaining that it is more than one cut but I'd like to add why. The fact is that, even today, it's pretty much impossible to make a feature-length film in one cut... even with digital recording. In the 50s, it was even more limited. All films were shot on actual film and filmmakers had to work around the limited length of ...


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Assuming you're referring to the 1957 B&W version, the simplest answer is that the film was indeed unique (for the time) in consisting of some extremely long mobile sequences with a mounted camera. The initial scene with the jury introduction, for example is nearly 10 minutes long and involves no less than 30-40 different conversations in the foreground ...


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Now first of all, they definitely did not create zero gravity to films this, since this is way harder and more expensive then you might expect, and not really doable for a whole set at all. The only way to achieve that here on earth (well, not actually "on earth" either, but without putting the set in a geostationary orbit like satellites) would be through a ...


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For the hallway scene in Inception, they actually built a long corridor on a rotating set. From Wikipedia regarding the set: A hotel corridor was also constructed by Guy Hendrix Dyas, the production designer, Chris Corbould, the special effects supervisor, and Wally Pfister, the director of photography; it rotated a ...


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Even since the DVD format and the advent of 16:9 TVs made widescreen films more mainstream, there have been a number of movies that have been reformatted for home video from their original theatrical aspect ratios: The Last Emperor, Apocalypse Now, Avatar, and The Chronicles of Narnia: Voyage of the Dawn Treader come immediately to mind. However, such ...


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Industrial Light and Magic were responsible for creating the CGI bear. Yeah, it's CGI and not in-fact a real bear. They used reference footage from actual bears, even including a bear attack filmed at a zoo where a drunken man stumbled into the sanctuary. They used a stunt man to literally throw Leo around and tear at him. This meant that painting out the ...


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The first Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981) has a scene where Indy is thrown into a deep pit. As he raises his head, there is a line of dangerous asps hissing menacingly at him. If one does not look closely, it looks like he is within striking distance. But it is fairly obvious in that shot (in the film—the photo appears to have the reflections ...


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This has been said in a round about way, but here is the big difference. Good green screening is a massively manual endeavor. To get a good key in many situations involves manual rotoscoping to separate different element to run different keying processes on to get optimal results. (For example, a different style of key might work better on a characters red ...


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It was real but it wasn't the right way to make a sword, and it wasn't steel, when steel it's got enough to turn into a liquid, it is a bright white, that is about 1200°f, the stone would cool the steel causing it to create a loo that stopped it from flowing to the top, and it would spill out of the top of the cast, if it was steel they would have hammered ...



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