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32

Former projectionist here, let me weigh in on what's happened in the last 7 to 8 years. A bit of background: I started working projectors for my local theater in February 2007, and my last night was in March 2011. I no longer work this position because they transitioned to being completely digital, and I was among the first cut as I was only in one or two ...


31

A properly executed plot twist often causes opposite reactions of what you've just described. People want to watch the movie again because the ending was so unexpected that they need to review the whole thing to get all the puzzle pieces together. "Fight Club" is a great example, in my opinion. There's a lot of dialogue (especially the lines from Helena ...


30

My guess: people like me often visit domains in movies/TV shows/books just for fun. If I see the domain is unregistered, I can register it myself and draw traffic from nerds like myself. Basically, I'm letting Sony advertise for me. I can even imply movie affiliation and do terrible things: "Welcome to Sony's secret site! You have cleverly spotted the ...


20

Just a theory, but being able to buy a domain this way is a pretty clear indication that a legitimate company cannot come after the film company to sue for being libelled or defamed for a less than perfect company portrayal. If currently unused, it is an indication there is not a naming conflict to a company that is not well known. The fact that you noticed ...


18

Whilst there are some cinemas that still retain use of 35mm projectors, it's fair to say that these are only used for special events. Modern cinema, by which I mean the industry that distributes and exhibits mainstream content (so any new releases), are exclusively distributed in digital format. In early 2002, Hollywood sought to standardize this technology ...


17

The reason why musicals are less popular now, or more prolific back in the first half of the century is pretty long, but hopefully engaging and interesting. It certainly was to me when I studied it. There are tons of academic books written about the downfall of musicals, but here's the short(er) version: Musicals (along with Westerns) were very much a ...


15

The 'Fidelity Issue' has been a long term fixture on many (if not most) film/production and screenwriting qualifications. During my Degree we had an entire module named 'Adaptation', and for three weeks we discussed/researched this very question without verifiable success. It's unlikely you'll find a satisfactory answer to something so broad on here, but ...


12

The Creative Skill Set website breaks it down in general for you: Theatrical (ie. cinema) revenues only account for about 25% of the total revenues, with video (including DVD) taking about 40%; television accounting for 28% and ancillary revenues the final 7%. The website goes on to say: How Revenue Flows Through the Marketplace The main ...


12

A few tidbits that I can pull from looking at both David O. Selznick and Louis B. Mayer via Wikipedia: Louis B. Mayer was pretty much the figure head of MGM during its golden years, and is considered the creator of the "star system", focusing more on producing and advertising films around the stars in his films rather than the films themselves. David O. ...


12

Closing credits are not entirely there for the audience, although I have a few friends that work in the movie industry and it's cool to see their names scroll by at the end of a movie. The ones that you see for electricians, gaffers, best boy, etc., are part of the film crew. It's an acknowledgement that without those people, the film would not have been ...


12

In the USA, this is governed by the agreements of the Director's Guild of America. Their basic agreement states in section 8-201 that: No other credit shall appear on the card which accords credit to the Director of the film. Such credit shall be on the last title card appearing prior to principal photography. This convention even appears to cover ...


11

Here's an article answering your question. In short: Out of a typical 6 trailers, two are chosen by the studio that made the film you paid to see. The other four are usually chosen by the theater which profiles the audience using a quadrant system (male, female, under 25, over 25). Sometimes the choice will be based on rating (if you are at an NC-17 ...


10

From the official website: Nomination ballots are mailed to the Academy’s active members in late December and are due back to PricewaterhouseCoopers, an international accounting firm, in January. Regular awards are presented for outstanding individual or collective film achievements in up to 25 categories. Members from each of the branches ...


9

Two reasons: So that the film company doesn't lose out on a potential profit if someone buys a domain name associated with a movie/TV show and sells it. Apparently there's a small culture out there to purchase domain names related to a recently-announced movie/TV show, as when the movie company finds out its already registered most of the time they'll pay ...


7

Andrew Cripps (former president of Paramount Pictures International and United Internationl Pictures) wrote an Overview of International Film Markets and Theatrical Distribution: Studios split the International market into three main areas: Europe Far East (including Australasia) Latin America The Distribution Process: ...


7

Netflix has done the next best thing to what you suggest with House of Cards (which cost $100 million to produce) and Lillyhammer by releasing these episodic series directly along with their other online features. You cannot see them in a theatre. There was an announcement of another series, this one science fiction, coming in late 2014. I heard an ...


7

This is merely observation and some speculation, but I've noticed a few factors: Sometimes the studios wait to release a few similar titles (theme, actor, director) at once. Often in box sets with the films also available individually at the same time or a few months later. Possibly not applicable at least as far as Forsyth is concerned. Sometimes they ...


6

A B-Movie isn't really a measure of budget, but rather is a genre all of its own. For example, by your criteria The Blair Witch Project would be considered a B-Movie due to its tiny budget and low production values, but this is not the case. At the other end of the spectrum, we could consider Pacific Rim to be one of the biggest budgeted B-movies around, so ...


6

I have a friend who owns a (very) small theater... so some of this probably isn't "official" (I know they bend the rules a bit at times). Also, they operate only on film, I'm not for sure about digital Anyway, one thing a lot of people don't realize is that film is usually shipped on 6 or so small reels. The movie theater then tapes together these reels ...


6

From eHow In Hollywood, the nominating and selecting for the Oscars are done by the writers, actors, directors, animators, art directors and executives. The only requirement is that each participant be a part of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Members of AMPAS are courted by film studios with free screeners, gifts and social evenings in ...


6

I would assume that the most important reason is that there isn't an alternative to child actors in movies, TV-series etc., whereas in most/all other cases the job can be executed by an adult. Moreover not all child labor is prohibited: These laws do not consider all work by children as child labour; exceptions include work by child artists, ...


5

Very little, though it really depends on their relationship with the director and producer. I've worked on sets where the screenwriter was definitely not wanted, seen as a threat to the director's authority. Of course I've worked on other sets where the director and writer were rather good friends and the writers were asked questions and opinions. They ...


5

Is there some rule/regulation from the content providers that say when broadcasting on TV they have to add a station logo? Only because they've bought / recorded / invested their own money for the broadcasting program. It's a copyright. What will they do, if you record their program and broadcast on your own, or just sell it somewhere? (similar to ...


5

In some cases the original delay involved the time required for licensing (music), appropriate copyrights, ratings, and in some cases the redubbing of the film into other languages. The latter of which can not typically begin until the final edit is determined. In some major films (especially action films) the final edit may not be complete until the film ...


5

I have not seen many examples of Hollywood movies shown first in the rest of the world before the USA, but it is certainly the case that simultaneous release around the world is now normal when it used to be rare. If the trend has continued beyond 'simultaneous' to now opening in the rest of the world first, it is probably for the same reason. There are ...


5

There are no "end to end" companies. United Artists cinema chain is actually part of the Regal Entertainment group, while United Artists the motion picture company is part of the MGM holdings group. As far as I am aware (and have seen in a quick look) no company also owns a theater chain. Theaters "can" show any movie that they can get a contract for. ...


5

Robin Williams was a king of "Improvisational" comedy, where he can take a subject or event (or even a prop) and spout funny lines or impressions off the top of his head. One must be entirely quick-witted to excel in Improv, which is one of the reasons it's a difficult art to master (and most clips of Williams' work will confirm he did, in fact, Master that ...


5

I think, this varies from scene to scene. For example, I was recently watching Modern Family and in a scene, Jay & Gloria's son is shown starts crying, when his mother is putting him in his baby-car and stops crying when she pulls him out. Similarly in one episode the baby pukes as soon as someone talks of Gay-marriage. This is shown 3 times. What's ...


4

Movies are often re-released according to a schedule, which can be dictated by any number of variables. Often, whoever owns the rights to a movie lacks the resources to directly distribute the film directly, and as such will strike up a deal with a Distribution company. This is becoming more and more common as studios are becoming less vertically ...



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