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35

I think it was the argument more than the fighting that attracted them. Remember Tyler's philosophy is "self-improvement is like masturbation, but self-destruction is good" or something like that. If he was beating himself up, and then told other people that philosophy, it's easy to see how a club dedicated to self-destruction and the Tyler Durden ...


27

Marla Singer is real. And here is why. Throughout the movie, she does have a certain ring about her that would allude her to the same appearance as Tyler. A mechanism to cope with him exploiting the groups by introducing a woman into the mix. She is inherently, a real person in terms of the movie. The Restaruant. Probably the most obvious reference to ...


23

I'm going to assume you did not get the twist of the movie and will do my best to explain what happens: The whole twist of the movie (and an excellent reason to watch it multiple times) is that The Narrator (nameless, some assume his name is Jack) actually has a split personality disorder. Tyler Durden does not exist and is just a figment of his split ...


22

It appears to me that the narrator is becoming jealous of Tyler's relationship with others in Project Mayhem, and that this results in his explosive burst of anger in the fight. He also expresses some desire to break something beautiful - he perceives both Tyler and the blond to be more attractive than himself. However, I am not entirely sure I can link ...


20

The purpose of the end scene of the movie is to have the Narrator finally conquer his 'problems' in the form of killing Tyler. He cannot simply shoot at him as he is just a hallucination of his own mind and the bullet would just fly off into nothing. While before beating him up would have worked, it was just a physical representation of a mental battle. ...


19

The cave and the penguin are result of therapy where the female voice tells the whole group how to "meditate".Every person has their own interpretation of the cave and an animal that is inside(which represents them),in narrator's case he sees himself as a penguin. He probably interpreted himself as penguin to show himself inability to let go of his ...


14

In addition to Orion's answer, I'd add that while it's not specifically stated in the movie, I think it's implied well enough that the Narrator's name is not Tyler Durden. Tyler says at one point that the Narrator is "slowly letting himself become Tyler Durden." If his name was actually Tyler, this line wouldn't make any sense. I suspect the movie avoids ...


14

Since Ed developed Tyler as part of his split personality a.k.a. Dissociative identity disorder. Then all memories of Tyler are actually his with his mind filling in the logical holes in the memory. So Tyler looks and acts like a separate person with all the accessories that would make the separate person. It is not until the end that the two personalities ...


11

I always took that to mean one of the Project Mayhem members locked the door. Edward Norton's character imagined/remembered that it was him instead of someone else doing it. Presumably this was guided by Tyler. We see Edward Norton's character imagine himself doing things at other points in the movie. For example during the Tyler and Marla having sex ...


11

The first time you see the fight, some people look at them because they're interested in the fight, and then later ask him if they could have a go one time. Then later, when it turns out he was beating himself up, it still makes sense actually, because it's still a valid reason for them to go looking at him, and also to ask if they could have a go (in this ...


9

Black Comedy and Satire are not quite two forms of the same thing. Satire is not always funny and is used to convey a message on a topic, while Black Comedy can be a part of a Satirical message. If you are familiar at all with the movie M*A*S*H, it is a black comedy about the Korean War. The Television series of the same name that spawned from that movie ...


8

This appears to be intentionally ambiguous on the part of the author. From an interview with author Chuck Palahniuk: What exactly IS the name of the main character in Fight Club, is his name Tyler, Jack, or something else? His name was never given in the book. They needed a name for the screenplay to put next to the character's lines so they just ...


8

Quoted from Wikipedia: Fincher considered the novel too infatuated with Tyler Durden and changed the ending to move away from him: "I wanted people to love Tyler, but I also wanted them to be OK with his vanquishing." Something I learned about Fight Club during an interview with Chuck Palanihuk is that he considers Fight Club a coming-of-age story; ...


7

There are actually six scenes/flashes where we see Brad Pitt before The Narrator meets him on the plane. A list of them has been compiled here. The reasoning behind this is covered well in an IMDb FAQ: As astute viewers will have observed, Tyler Durden appears in the film six times prior to the scene where The Narrator meets him on the plane. Four of ...


6

When you watch the scene closely (I wish I had screenshots...might have to dig later) you can clearly see that he doesn't shoot himself in the back of the head, but really in the side of the mouth, albeit farther back than his cheek. Even if you feel around with your tongue you can feel that it is just skin and muscle and nothing important until you get to ...


6

A model for destruction? It is entirely possible that in the Narrator's lucid state, he was scanning the crowd subconsciously, looking for the image that would become Tyler Durden. Peering upon person to person to find the right image that would become his 'perfect' personality, the basis for his rebirth, the basis of What a man is supposed to look like. ...


3

I have never heard of this theory before but it does make sense from the movie perspective only though the book does make it clearer that she exists. Just to play Devil's Advocate to TylerShads I'm going to say that Marla is another one of Tyler Durden's personalities. Let's take it from the top. She walks into a testicular cancer group smoking and asks ...


2

It might help to not think of black comedy as being defined as being humor about "cannibalism, rape, genocide, terminal illnesses," but rather to think of it as gallows humor. Gallows humor is, loosely, defined as humor in the face of impossible situations. The most famous historical example is probably Oscar Wilde, on his death bed, saying "either that ...


2

My comment is about the book not the movie, but it is relevant to this thread because many of you think that Marla's ontological claims are stronger on page than on screen. I beg to disagree. But then my theory is even more extreme than any I see here. I think that all of Project Mayhem is a part of "Jack's" delusion. None of it is real. If I am right about ...


2

I'm not sure because I didn't read the book. But in the movie, when Marla crosses the street to the thrift shop a car stops to avoid hitting Marla. From the perspective of the camera there was absolutely no reason for the car to emergency brake to a stop. However, if Marla were a manifestation of Jack's psyche, the perspective would be Marla looking back at ...


2

The scene in which Marla is asking whom Jack is speaking to while Tyler is in the basement is interesting. Why would she ask if she was also another split personality? Tyler manages to avoid being in the same room with her throughout the movie. Why? Also, why else would Tyler demand Jack to never talk about Tyler or what goes on in the house to Marla. One ...


1

(I would definitely checkout the helpful comment discussion that TylerShads commented with.) The answer is no the building they stand in and watch the destruction from isn't meant to be blown up and doesn't blow up. It does shake from the shock wave of the other buildings collapsing. The building they were standing in was chosen to view the perfect ...


1

The hole in Tyler's head is just showing the narrators total rejection of Tyler. It's less about the actual shooting and more about the fact that he maned up and became what Tyler was there for. He saw Tyler as a problem. The act of him shooting himself is what got rid of Tyler ( his total rejection of Tyler). He no longer had a need for that personality ...


1

Jack is jealous. I just went back and watched it, and the scene preceding that is the bathroom scene. After they all run out, Tyler pats Angel Face on the back and smiles at him, and the narrator says "I am Jack's burning sense of rejection" or something along those lines. So he beats Angel Face up out of jealousy.



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