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12

When asked about the Adam West character in an interview with A.V. Club, Seth MacFarlane said: I wrote on a show called Johnny Bravo when I was at Hanna-Barbera, and he guest-starred as himself. He was so funny, and he's got this way about him. I think he likes playing into what he's known for, even on a casual basis. He's a really fun guy to work with, ...


11

It's a reference to the movie Fatal Attraction. In that film, Glenn Close's character has a brief affair with Michael Douglas' character and then begins to stalk him, etc. There is a scene where her character, Alex, listens to a song from Madame Butterfly (which is also about a man who has a casual affair with a woman and then dumps her) and switches the ...


10

Although there is no hard and fast official answer for this (at least not an obvious one), Conway Twitty used to be known as The High Priest of Country Music and held sway over his audience, often being described as 'mesmerizing'. To this end, the makers of Family Guy have used his live performances as a distraction whenever a particularly bad taste joke or ...


9

Here is an interview that Seth MacFarlane did with Kevin Pollak where he actually asks him about that specifically. http://www.kevinpollakschatshow.com/archive/?cat=202 The discussion of the overall theme of the long running joke that Family Guy does starts at around 1:03:00 The last of the discussion is at 1:11:00. The specific Conway Twitty cutaway part is ...


7

It has featured occasionally: Some examples are: Halloween on Spooner's Street (S09E04) - here is a video of it. Ready Willing and Disabled (S03E15) Wasted Talent (S02E20) - when Peter and Brian try and find the "golden ticket" to get entry to the Pawtucket Brewery they get drunk in the sun room. That's the episode the image above is from. Stewie ...


7

I think the joke is about Rollen Stewart, the person who's famous for bringing the "John 3:16" signs to sporting events. He first appeared at sports games wearing rainbow-colored wigs and was frequently seen on Television, but then later started bringing the signs to promote Christianity. Apparently at first just in it for the publicity, Stewart became a ...


6

Because it's cartoons — Stewie is still a baby, too. Generally, cartoons are not too happy about altering the state of the show by letting big things happen. Cartoons are for a lot of people not shows they follow consistently, rather they just watch a few episodes once in a while in no particular order. To that end, if the scenario changed in every episode ...


5

That Wiki link actually has a lot of insight. The first line in the plot section: The episode uses the premise that Family Guy is based on a British television show. Premise being the key word. In the Cultural References section: In the interlude to the Chap of the Manor segment, Stewie jokingly says that Family Guy is based on The ...


3

It is a reference to a scene from the movie Flash Gordon. You can see the scene here.


2

The actor who voices Adam West in Family Guy actually is Adam West (the guy who plays the Batman you pictured). Whether it's a real representation of the actor himself (modern appearance) is something you'll have to determine yourself. Whether there's some in-joke or particular reason why Adam West was cast or the character name was the same is something ...


2

The joke is 100% about Rollen Stewart, the guy who made the "John 3:16" sign famous. Most people never bother to look up the actual quote until they go on late-night Wiki train rides and eventually discover the inspirational quote. However, in the context of Family Guy, a show that lampoons religion at every opportunity (McFarlane is a noted Atheist), the ...


1

I'm not sure that is really from an actual song. Rather than that, it is supposed to be the classic stereotypical funky-style "porn music" to imply that the stork and the woman are indeed about to make that baby right now, as also implied by the red light the stork installs and his whole behaviour. This kind of cliché "porn music" is a common trope often ...



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