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18

A movie production can do another take if it doesn't look good. Typically, a quality TV series or movie spends $100,000s per finished minute in post production cleaning up green screen shots. The commentary in the updated Battlestar Galactica mentioned how one can tell there was money left over on an episode when there is more than a few seconds of the ...


18

Lola VFX worked on the body transformation of Chris Evans. From the article How to make a Captain America wimp Lola had three primary approaches to shrinking the 220 pound Evans to the 140 pound guy he needed to be, while maintaining Evans’ performance as closely as possible. Body double / actor doubling for the entire body. The body double was ...


17

It's called Dolly Zoom (but there are a couple of alternate names for it) From MediaCollege: A dolly zoom is a cinematic technique in which the camera moves closer or further from the subject while simultaneously adjusting the zoom angle to keep the subject the same size in the frame. The effect is that the subject appears stationary while the ...


17

Another common technique is to use a "process trailer", aka an insert trailer or low loader. It is used as a moving camera platform and is towed by a special truck-like vehicle that may contain cameras, booms and or lights. The process trailers are generally very low to the ground to give a realistic perspective of height. They can expand in width to allow ...


17

CGI was actually fairly common practice by the 1990s, a watershed period for digital visual effects. Most prominently rendered in wireframe in the 1970s (Star Wars IV, 1977; Superman, 1978), by the mid-80s various scifi and fantasy films employed photoreal mapping effects (Flight of the Navigator, 1986) and were making strides in live action/digital ...


15

Can't recall the particular shot, but the effect is commonly created using multiple composite layers Typically there will be three layers the person walking in real time, the person in slow time, the background Each is filmed separately as individual layers. For the "people" layers only the people (and I guess the punchbag in this case) are used - the ...


15

The technique you are talking about with stationary car on set is called Chroma key compositing or chroma keying: is a special effects / post-production technique for compositing (layering) two images or video streams together, used heavily in many fields to remove a background from the subject of a photo or video - particularly the newscasting, motion ...


14

The primary technique used for flying stunts are wire harnesses and then wire removal. The actors wear a harness which is connected to wires that suspend the actor in mid-air. If the scene is filmed in front of a green screen (chroma keying), then the wires can be removed automatically in most cases, before the background is added. If no chroma keying is ...


13

An article in the New York Times gives quite a few details from creator Vince Gilligan. In short: No, they didn't move a big electromagnet around. The real one weighed 3.5 tons, so they made a foam model. The jumping objects were attached to cables pulled by crew members. The cables were then digitally erased. It's also doubtful that such a scheme ...


11

The film won the Academy Award for Best Visual Effects largely because that tiger looked so real. Special effects supervisor Bill Westenhofer wrote in an interview for Digital Trends “We used [real tigers] for single shots, where it was just the tiger in the frame, and they’re doing something that didn’t have to be all that specific in the action that ...


10

Chroma key is the effect used to replace a single color with video from another source. Commonly called "green screen", other colors, originally blue, and now orange or magenta can also be used, depending on the subject and effect desired. Wikipedia has a fairly detailed description.


10

At first I thought it might have been a breakaway model, used by the likes of Orsen Welles to make a camera appear to pass through a neon sign or window in Citizen Kane, but then I watched the clip and realized this could not be the case. I have had some experience with motion control cameras, and this certainly seems to have been produced using a track ...


9

I'd stick with what System Down wrote in the comments: different directors. I have at least two reasons for that. First, there is no mention of the difference in the books. He always appears in the flame. Here is what it says in the "Goblet of Fire": The room was in semidarkness; the flames were the only source of light. Nearby, on a table, the Support ...


8

In similar fashion, we have no explanation of the motive of the Kirsten Dunst's character to crash her own wedding too. And we have seen the slow-motioned flying objects in the prolongue already so I do not think Lars von Trier tried to save up financially. I think he tried to focus more on the emotional effect. The sight of the protagonists being swallowed ...


8

The CG was done by a company called Animal Logic. They used LEGO Digital Designer, a free computer program which allows users to build models using virtual LEGO bricks, in a computer-aided design (CAD) like manner. This allowed them to get high precession models and also the required bricks per model. The created LEGO Digital Designer (LDD) files were then ...


8

I couldn't tell you the exact technique they would have used, but I assume they just had an effect artist colour it in post-production. For the record, CGI was being used in film to varying degrees all throughout the 1980s, though they have said that one of the only CG shots in Total Recall was for the x-ray scanner scene.


8

According to Den Of Geek - Top SFX shots: The nails are rotoscoped to provide an area for an animated colour transition to take place, and that's all there is to it. Rotoscoping refers to the technique of manually creating a matte for an element on a live-action plate so it may be composited over another background Some other examples of ...


7

One of the DVDs from the series has an excellent special feature showing the process used. It was often a combination of Green Screen/CGI and staged actors and props. So to answer the question it is a fusion of both. The example shown on the DVD is a scene in the street where he's moving through a crowded shopping district and rescuing a child from an ...


7

The recent film "Hugo" references the urban legend of contemporary audiences of 1896 watching the Lumière Brothers "L'Arrivée d'un train en care de La Ciotat" (The Arrival of a Train at La Ciotat Stations) where the audience supposedly became overwhelmed at the approach of a train because it was shot in a manner that made people believe it was headed mostly ...


7

Yes, George Miller used sped up footage a great deal when filming his trilogy, especially during the first film (to a lesser extent in the third). This is indeed a standard trick used by filmmakers to make the action seem faster-paced, and is used primarily during chases and stunt work which could result in serious injury should the stunt performer fall ...


6

There's a bunch of ways to do this. Most likely: They took 130 takes to get it right Less likely: There's an invisible turn table under the gun They used an electromagnet to stop the gun The gun is on a clear plastic stick and someone out of sight is turning it


6

The answer is that both real animals and Computer Generated Imagery (CGI) were used. Clearly in situations which will put an animal or an actor in danger, they will use CGI. See this article.


6

I know for LOTR, the long scenes in the house of Bilbo, they actually made two versions of it. One small one, and one big one. In the small one Gandalf would be too big, and in the other one Bilbo would be extremely small. Using digital effects, and other techniques mentioned in the comments, these two can be merged together to get the effect they were ...


6

I think your presumption that the film portrays realistic sci-fi may be misplaced. The extensive use of symbolism and prologue scenes suggest that it is allegorical. While I usually agree that having authentic situations or plausible science is important, in this film I found it easy to dismiss with that expectation. There is an analysis of the Justine ...


6

TL;DR According to Guinness, the record is 20 hours for the temporary tattoos on Rod Steiger's entire body in the film The Illustrated Man, but there are many honorable mentions that came close. Full Answer In the 1969 movie The Illustrated Man, Rod Steiger plays a man whose entire body is covered in tattoos, each telling a story. The many intricate ...


5

Because the medium is different. It's clear that the spell used by Sirius Black is Floo Network's Head-only transport. But medium for both the istances are different. In Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire when Sirius Black talk's to harry there is only coal present in fire place. But in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix , when serious talk to ...


5

A "render hour" refers an hour of computer time it takes to generate a visual image ("render") from raw input data such as a 3D model. The amount of time it takes to render a given image depends on a LOT of different factors including how complex the input data is (and how much input data elements there are, since there can be textures, lights, ...


5

Most likely, the scene is a mix of real shots and special effects, but all of the cool parts are special effects. For reference, here is an image of the scene in question (I was unable to upload it to SE due to the file size being too large). Heating of the sword The glowing effect is CGI. I say this because the sword has a consistent yellow and orange ...


4

There doesn't appear to be any official rating system, disappointingly. As a previous user @Pubby answered, what you are referring to is the "depth" of the film (as per Wikipedia): Depth perception is the visual ability to perceive the world in three dimensions (3D) and the distance of an object. A few websites have had users try and champion a ...


4

The term would be depth (or rather, the illusion of depth), although I haven't seen any actual ratings of it. Films that really seem to pop are generally filmed in 3D and then enhanced post-production when adding in special effects.



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