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46

I have worked with children on horror films/thrillers and, having found no official guidelines from SAG other than payment policies such as Coogan's Law, I have usually employed a number of tactics. Firstly, I'll go over the scene and storyboard very carefully with the child's parents/guardians (although this isn't always constructive as many parents will ...


39

A fun example from "The Shining": Because Danny Lloyd was so young and since it was his first acting job, Stanley Kubrick was highly protective of the child. During the shooting of the movie, Lloyd was under the impression that the film he was making was a drama, not a horror movie. He only realized the truth seven years later, when, aged 13, he ...


24

The editing, filming techniques, and set attitude can seriously change the perception of what is actually going on. In various horror movie "behind the scenes" (last I can think of is Sam Raimi commentary on Evil Dead), it seems like casts for horror flicks are very upbeat and everybody is having fun. With many horror films it's only once the scenes are ...


13

As for the U.S., producers can choose to make their films in compliance with the American Humane Association Film and TV Unit. They are the only group officially sanctioned to do this and it is they who provide the "No animals were harmed . . ." message during credit sequences. Note that bringing in the AHA to monitor the production of a film is voluntary. ...


12

2D to 3D Video Conversion is the process of transforming the original 2D video to a 3D form, which in almost all cases is stereo, so it is the process of creating imagery for each eye from one 2D image. That is why the transformation is also called 2D to stereo 3D conversion, or stereo conversion. Two approaches to stereo conversion can be loosely ...


10

I'll admit I'd never seen it in cinema, so I was unaware of some of these bits. The only reason I could see to cut those bits would possibly to alter the censor ratings, it's a well known fact that sometimes films (and tv series) when rated get given one thing for cinema/broadcast but when they are put onto a media format sometimes the show/films wants to ...


10

I just re-watched the scene on the "Widescreen Limited Edition" version of A New Hope. This is the one that contained not only the re-mastered and Lucas-ized update done in 2006, but also a copy of the earlier print that was not restored. (And you can see a lot of clarity and picture stability issues in it.) In that print, Luke throws the line and hook, ...


10

Don’t forget that marketing may start on a film long before a final print is finished for theatrical distribution. Often times, editors will have access to ALL of the footage when cutting a trailer, sometimes just specific sequences. It’s a collaborative effort where they approve whatever is used, but this is why alternate takes or even jokes are used in ...


9

From How Film Composers Work: The film music composer: Meets with the director and movie producers, when the film has been shot and is being edited, to discuss music needs for the film. Takes part in a spotting session, in which the film composer, director and others watch the movie and decide where each segment of music should start and stop ...


7

As a filmmaker, I can provide some insight into this, however there are always going to be exceptions to the rule. In general, a film is scored after editing—a notable exception to this would be the specific use of a particular piece of established music, in which case the editor may well be asked to edit to the beats of that music. For a scored ...


6

It is done using Computer Graphics. I do not know about others, but atleast in Bollywood, all the movies that have even a small scene with any animal, shows the following message at before the actual start of the movie: No Animals were harmed during the making of the movie. It is a work of Computer Graphics. Some movies like, All the Best Starring Ajay ...


6

I did a little bit of online research on this, and it would appear that the American distributors considered the movie too long, complicated and controversial and employed the playwright Channing Pollock to make a new version. The American release was considerably shorter than the original (at 115 minutes it was about 25% shorter than the original) and ...


6

I have also worked on film sets and I concur with @Nobby. I think a larger point, though, is that situations are generally only “scary” when actors are in character. For example consider Halloween. An adult dressed like a corpse and covered in bruise makeup and fake blood isn’t scary to most children if she’s chatting and laughing and walking around as if ...


5

I'm almost certain it comes down to parent permission and what they are comfortable allowing the child to see when working with the directors. Some are naturally more lenient than others while I'm sure some are only allowed on set to film their scenes and they never get to see what they filmed after post-production because of it being too graphic. (The ...


5

3D movies are normally filmed using two slightly offset cameras. Both images are projected onto the viewing screen, with those plastic glasses feeding one image into your left eye and the other into your right. When a film was not shot using two offset cameras, the conversion involves manual identification of different depths in the shot, as summarized in ...


4

Cross fades and pans are more common in (low budget) television for some reason, and even more common in home video—I have my theories about the causes, but that does not affect this question. View any quality movie and you'll see that almost every cut (99+%) is a classic straight cut. For extra effect, maybe there is a fade to black or fade from ...


3

4:3 aspect ratio is in the market since the early days of television. 16:9 came into picture more recently. It is true that 16:9 is becoming more and more popular now a days. But we have not reached the time to forget about them. 4:3: Standard 4:3 format aspect ratio A standard aspect ratio television screen is a TV with a resolution that matches the ...


3

I think you are talking about repeated graphic match cut. From Wikipedia- A match cut, also called a graphic match (or, in the French term, raccord), is a cut in film editing between either two different objects, two different spaces, or two different compositions in which an object in the two shots graphically match, often helping to establish ...


3

I think they do that on purpose. Many scenes that are included for a certain trailer don't make the final cut when the actual film comes out. So maybe those are from the deleted scenes.


3

According to Movie Outline's Glossary Of Screenwriting Terms & Filmmaking Definitions: FLASH CUT: An extremely brief shot, sometimes as short as one frame, which is nearly subliminal in effect. Also a series of short staccato shots that create a rhythmic effect. For example: Splice Trailer #2: More Flash Cuts, More Creature ...


3

I know you may not want to hear this, but is it possible you're mis-remembering things? It would be against the law for the film to be released under a different cut on home video without it being re-assessed by the BBFC. As you can see on their website, however, no changes were made. (The running-time difference due to the change in frame rate from film ...


2

I don't know if it was ever included in a print of the film, but I found a "documentary" that played on Nick at Nite on Youtube that is exactly the footage you are describing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=frXlYeflkt4


1

From the Wikipedia article on South Park (which you could've found with a bit of Google): When the show began using computers, the cardboard cutouts were scanned and re-drawn with CorelDRAW, then imported into PowerAnimator, which was used with SGI workstations to animate the characters.[46][48] The workstations were linked to a 54-processor ...


1

Rather than being a match cut, I have always known this type of edit as a FORM CUT. From the wiki entry for Form Cut: The cut joins together two pieces of film that contain two similarly shaped objects in similar positions in the frame. However - I would not refer to this as 'seamless', as the viewer is often acutely aware that the cut has taken ...


1

Weird because I had almost the opposite recently happen. I had seen The Truman Show numerous times in the past, and recently saw it again and I swear there were whole scenes in this Bluray release that I had never seen before, and I remember the original being structured differently. In the Bluray release, we only start seeing the viewers watching the ...



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