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28

In addition to KeyBrdBasher's excellent out-of-universe answer I'd like to concentrate a bit more on Django's motivation, even if it's really just plain speculation on my part. You have to consider that Django has been a slave for all his life, wearing nothing else than mere rags, if so much at all. It certainly makes sense for him to dress as ...


23

Nice question! There's a very solid piece of trivia behind it that will perhaps make you appreciate Quentin Tarantino and his style even more. A Django trivia article on Badass Digest explains it like this: When Django gets his first outfit it turns out to be quite similar to a Thomas Gainsborough painting, The Blue Boy. This 1770 painting was created ...


11

I don't think it was ever even considered that Schultz goes there alone, so it's not an addressed issue. The rest of my answer is speculative. First, it's Django's wife, so it is a matter of ego, and it is emotionally very important that he comes to her rescue. Given his temper, I have hard time imagining him waiting for Schultz to rescue her, even if it ...


8

In the beginning, Django seem like only bounty help to Schultz but slowly Schultz and Django learn about each other and in a scene Django tells how his wife got sold in to the slavery and Schultz reveals about his wife's death. Schultz starts teaching Django how to shoot and becomes his mentor and also there were instances where Schultz admires Django's ...


6

I haven't found any interviews with Tarantino or the rest of the crew to definitively answer this, but I think it's largely about the symbolism involved. Just before Django killed John Brittle, he is recited scripture from the Old Testament (about justice) to a slave girl, while he whips her. He believes he is right. He believes he is superior to the girl, ...


4

Him hating all the white people is a bit of a stretch, after all that white Dr. Shultz did for him. However, hating all the Candies is not a wee bit of a stretch. Covering his track is also a good motive: random slaves are not very likely reveal (or even be asked) who killed their hated masters when some sheriff or a marshal come to investigate, but Calvin ...


4

Whilst Steven may not have 'lost' his limp, there is definitely a suggestion that he is deliberately exaggerating his physical handicap... The entire film is a portrait of ethnic stereotypes, with each character seemingly tackling and subverting hackneyed clichés; In Stephen's case, 'The Uncle Tom'... The phrase "Uncle Tom" has also become an epithet ...


4

I'll take a different tack and state what may be obvious: It's a conceit of the narrative that Django goes along. He's the protagonist of the film, so his involvement in all aspects of that narrative becomes necessary to keep him in that role. The film makes it abundantly clear that Candie's primary interest was in Mandingo fighting slaves. The remainder of ...


3

I'll add my two cents as a short video producer with a film degree. In that sequence, I think there are only 4 shots that actually show Jamie Foxx holding the whip and hitting the guy. The rest of the shots either show Jamie by himself marching forward and flinging the whip around, or show the guy on the ground with a whip landing next to him, or show ...


1

She might not have ordered anything particularly severe that we saw but she was complicit with the brutal treatment of the slaves at the house, including Broomhilda. Her brother adored her and she could easily have used that influence to ease the plight of the people there but she chose not to and merely enjoyed the luxury of her life off their backs. She ...


1

I think it was partially Django's character. He wanted and probably felt it was approriate to help rescue his wife rather than let someone else do it and just sit on his hands. Whilst his being there made things more complicated it was only an amazingly sharp witted Stephen who saw through anything. He was desperate to see his wife again and wanted ...


1

Actually, it was explained as to why Django went to Candieland. Shultz was the money man in their little plan, while Django was the one who had to identify the fighter they intended to purchase. Shultz explained this beforehand. In their plan, Django was to play the part of the experienced and expert fighter, and thus the best judge of the fighter they ...



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