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27

In addition to KeyBrdBasher's excellent out-of-universe answer I'd like to concentrate a bit more on Django's motivation, even if it's really just plain speculation on my part. You have to consider that Django has been a slave for all his life, wearing nothing else than mere rags, if so much at all. It certainly makes sense for him to dress as ...


22

Nice question! There's a very solid piece of trivia behind it that will perhaps make you appreciate Quentin Tarantino and his style even more. A Django trivia article on Badass Digest explains it like this: When Django gets his first outfit it turns out to be quite similar to a Thomas Gainsborough painting, The Blue Boy. This 1770 painting was created ...


21

I believe it is to be interpreted as "getting the last laugh", "getting one up", or "getting the better" of the other person. A game of wits in which the two are playing mind games with each other to see who can get the last laugh. Throughout the scenes leading up to this moment, after Candie forces Schultz to pay 12,000 for Broomhilda, Candie repeatedly ...


16

You have slightly muddled the occurrence of events. Schultz has a flashback of the dog-mauling scene not right after Candie ups Broomhilda's(Django's wife) price, but later when the deal is being put to paper. In the violent moment where Candie threatens to bash Hilda's skull with a hammer, Schultz agrees to the raised price in a breath. Later, when Dr. ...


15

Zoe Bell, who starred for Tarantino in "Death Proof," played another character that was seemingly cut down -- one of the plantation enforcers who wears a bandana over her face and earns a third-act close-up. "Yeah, you don’t really get anything from her character,” Goggins said. “But she’s lethal. And you know, I should probably just stick to ...


12

Short answer: No The most obvious explanation of that scene is that the shells were casings from his own bullets or spare ammunition he hadn't been able to load before Stephen (the black estate manager) captured Broomhilda and threatened to shoot her. His action preceding that scene involved sheltering from hostile fire, which he wouldn't need to do if he ...


10

I don't think it was ever even considered that Schultz goes there alone, so it's not an addressed issue. The rest of my answer is speculative. First, it's Django's wife, so it is a matter of ego, and it is emotionally very important that he comes to her rescue. Given his temper, I have hard time imagining him waiting for Schultz to rescue her, even if it ...


9

According to this article Tarantino is a big fan of Australian exploitation cinema and wanted to work with actors from 70s Australian cinema because he thought it would be "cool." The characters were written as indentured servants - the mining company payed their way over from Australia years before and they are working for the mining company to "pay off" ...


9

In fact my answer is very similar to KeyBrd Basher's but I'm still going to post my views: I for myself wouldn't say that with this flashback he realized Candie was going to kill them all (which I'm not even sure was the case). I would rather say that this flashback just raised his anger over Candie's cruelty and increased his moral aversion against him, ...


8

In the beginning, Django seem like only bounty help to Schultz but slowly Schultz and Django learn about each other and in a scene Django tells how his wife got sold in to the slavery and Schultz reveals about his wife's death. Schultz starts teaching Django how to shoot and becomes his mentor and also there were instances where Schultz admires Django's ...


7

First of all, she is indeed spelled Broomhilda (with an "M") both in the credits and throughout the movie. I think it's only Schultz who calls her Brunhilda due to his habits. I just understood that as a parody of the original name, emphasizing her status as a slave, since she's supposed to carry a broom when cleaning up behind her masters, something along ...


5

I haven't found any interviews with Tarantino or the rest of the crew to definitively answer this, but I think it's largely about the symbolism involved. Just before Django killed John Brittle, he is recited scripture from the Old Testament (about justice) to a slave girl, while he whips her. He believes he is right. He believes he is superior to the girl, ...


4

I didn't catch any reference to future sequels — also because sequels are not decided by open endings or similar stuff, they are decided by the money the film managed to make and the likelihood of a sequel having a similar success (and revenue) —, rather a reference and play on the popular and fixed expression fastest gun in the west. I can't find an ...


4

There were certainly plenty of witnesses to the event. The household help who were allowed to escape still continue to be slaves of the Candies. IMO, both the housekeeper and Candie's mistress, Sheba (?), would, perhaps with a little persuasion, be happy to cooperate with any investigators. And investigation there will be, considering the nature of the ...


3

I think, that he wanted handshake, because of last abasement from Schults, who felt him his nonentity: he underlined Candy's faux-gentility, that he had many of books by Dumas but hadn't mind on its content (Schults was disgusted by Bethoven music because of this spuriousness too)


3

I'll take a different tack and state what may be obvious: It's a conceit of the narrative that Django goes along. He's the protagonist of the film, so his involvement in all aspects of that narrative becomes necessary to keep him in that role. The film makes it abundantly clear that Candie's primary interest was in Mandingo fighting slaves. The remainder of ...


3

I'll add my two cents as a short video producer with a film degree. In that sequence, I think there are only 4 shots that actually show Jamie Foxx holding the whip and hitting the guy. The rest of the shots either show Jamie by himself marching forward and flinging the whip around, or show the guy on the ground with a whip landing next to him, or show ...


2

Note that the proper spelling is Brünnhilde, so "broom" is not the only change, also the -e to an -a. Tarantino pretty obviously took the spelling from the comic strip, but I see no symbolism there other than the obvious: humiliation of a slave woman who inside was a proud valkyrie, and mocking Southern whites ignorant of the Nibelungenlied, their cultural ...


1

Actually, it was explained as to why Django went to Candieland. Shultz was the money man in their little plan, while Django was the one who had to identify the fighter they intended to purchase. Shultz explained this beforehand. In their plan, Django was to play the part of the experienced and expert fighter, and thus the best judge of the fighter they ...


1

I think the movie is purposely making many illusions to mid and late 20th century popular culture as well. Broomhilda is not the only character named after a comic strip. Leonardo Di Caprio's character is named Calvin (Calvin and Hobbs) he lives on the Candie-Land (similar to the children's board game) ranch. Django and Broomhilda are supposed to be the ...


1

Anybody think schultz poisoned dicaprio? he walks off scene after asking for a pen and.then comes back and give dicaprio the penn. when schultz takes the pen youll notice he grabs it in a certain spot, as apposed to dicaprio grabbed it full fisted. i think he poisoned him and was gonna leave but by shaking his hand he wouldve been poisoned as well. back ...



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