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3

Mostly Aramaic, if this is to be believed: When an Arabic speaking Muslim friend saw Mel Gibson’s movie Passion of the Christ with most of the dialogue in Aramaic, he was very surprised that he did not need most of the subtitles in English to understand the movie! According to Mark Goodacre's academic blog: one of the ballrooms hosts an event ...


2

Tried tracking the dialogue but could not find any origin story in english literature. Curiously enough this dialog was first used in the movie "Born Free", released in the year 1966. You mad, impetuous boy. http://www.subzin.com/quotes/M4847a56b/Born+Free/You+mad%2C+impetuous+boy.


0

The way I interpret it, is that while there are a lot of different flavours of wine, ultimately what we all enjoy from wine is the alcohol, which is the "one flavour" he's referring to. The same can be said for women. While there are women from different ethnic backgrounds around the world, what we men enjoy ultimately, is the woman herself, no matter where ...


4

From IMDB's Ocean's 13 FAQ: It's not well-explained in the movie. However, it implies a sort of 'gentlemen's agreement,' an unbreakable code between the members of an exclusive group of businessmen who have been operating in Las Vegas since the days when (Frank Sinatra) was a Vegas performer and a man's word was his bond. The inference is that one does ...


9

According to the script: WORF (groans) Ugghhh... Irving Berlin. And watching the clip, it sure sounds like it. (Irving Berlin wrote Blue Skies, the song Data is singing.)


1

Every Italian movie in those years was dubbed: it was difficult to catch up the sounds and the voices with contemporary tecniques and directors cared more about the movies itself than the actors' voices. Each actor performed using his own voice and language and the movies were then dubbed (and not always synced). As far as it is known no language is ...


21

In the the first series Eddard Stark discovers that He does this by using the same book that Jon Arryn uses to research the genealogy of the Baratheons through the ages. Eddard discovers that every Baratheon child for centuries has black hair. This is proven when he searches out all of King Robert's bastards and finds that they too have black hair. The ...


1

Not to get explicit, but when a guy is on top of a girl he will usually put his weight on his elbows or hands so he's not crushing the girl. If the girl has longer hair, his elbows/hands may be on her hair, and his weight would cause him to sink into the mattress a bit, pulling on her hair. That's what he means, and in that sense the Chinese translation is ...


3

I haven't seen the film so I don't really know the context for the scene: But it sounds like he's talking about how uncomfortable dating is and how awkward sex can be. As a woman ...


1

I think both have different meanings. son of a gun Means a tough guy. Example: In the movie The Avengers when Iron-Man guides the missile into the portal, loses consciousness and the portal was about to close, he comes back to earth falling. At this time, Cap says "Son of a gun.", meaning Iron-Man is a tough guy (Can be interpreted in many other ways but ...


5

The doctor asks if Marcus could stay with them and Will jokingly asks Suzie "my place or yours?". Now that's a line you'd rather ask a date you're going to hook up with and Will says that exactly as a joke to Suzie, playing with that meaning, who afterall was his date before the tragic events unfolded. But soon enough, and with the help of Suzie's confused ...


2

Yes, he meant the actual place. Zach wanted to get somewhere far away and this is the most remote place he could think of. It's also an amusing line because he's being desperate and naive: I think we need to get far away from here where the zombies can't get to us. [...] Machu Picchu. It's remote and safe. Look, I've got a map. I think if we take side ...


4

Sarcasm, or irony. Either way, it was meant for comic relief. Like, "Can you tell me anything worse than what you've already told me?" Same goes for using the nickname "Sunshine". It's meant as irony/sarcasm. Reminds me of a friend I had in high school who was chronically depressed. Kinda like Eyeore from Winnie The Pooh. Kids, being the cruel ...



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