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59

German: "Halt das Tor!" whereas Tor is better translates to gate than to door. This actually works well for "Hodor". French: As pradyot commented "Qu'ils n'aillent pas au-dehors!" becomes "Pas au-dehors!" and then "Hodor". Russian: "затвори ход" ("close the passage") which transitions to "hodor" in quite a strange and unusual way. Word "ход" here closer to "...


46

There are many ways to film dialogue scenes. In reality, what you see on film (unless there are no cuts at all) is a compilation of potentially dozens of takes of on-set film and audio recording, possibly coupled with digital recording sessions done after the fact (the way they record audio for animated films). Shooting a scene On a single camera shoot, ...


41

The original phrase is by Friedrich Nietzsche, in his book Twilight of the Idols: From life's school of war: what does not kill me makes me stronger This means that every experience in life makes you a stronger, more rounded person. Joker's phrase is obviously a word play on this, as other answered have already identified, but to give some more reasons ...


36

That gate to Moria was created in the "Second Age" of Middle Earth, and was used to trade mithril with the Noldorian Elves of Eregion. Relations between the Elves and the Dwarves were more cordial in the Second Age. The inscription and password on the gate created by Celebrimbor, the leader of the Noldor, hence is in elvish. Celebrimbor also forged the 3 ...


35

As I remember she said "bozhe moi"(Боже мой) which would be "My God" or better put "Oh My god!" and obviously it is Russian. To hear it pronounced Google translate


34

In this interview the actor who plays Ramsay (Iwan Rheon) refers to that line as meaning the lasting psychological damage that he's caused Sansa: I think [the final scene with Ramsay and Sansa] was great. It’s a good scene. It leaves Sansa in an interesting place as a character, because he’s saying, “I’m inside you now.” [Rheon shudders] It’s horrible, ...


33

In order for a film to get a 12A or PG-13 rating, it cannot contain gratuitous use of profanity: One 'Fuck' is allowed, anymore and it automatically becomes a 15 or R rated. That article features a very humorous piece of meta-textuality, referring to the Movie Be Cool, in which budding film producer Chili Palma states: “Do you know that unless you're ...


31

He is referring to the fact that he will become one with The Force - a technique only a handful of jedi have learned. As a 'spirit' he will continue to guide Luke, and thus become somewhat omniscient - subsequently becoming more powerful. You might say as an older man, he had become physically weak, but once bonded with the Force he becomes greater than ...


30

In the the first series Eddard Stark discovers that He does this by using the same book that Jon Arryn uses to research the genealogy of the Baratheons through the ages. Eddard discovers that every Baratheon child for centuries has black hair. This is proven when he searches out all of King Robert's bastards and finds that they too have black hair. The ...


29

I want to say it was his polite way of saying, "Not really, it made me aroused." When men become aroused, well, you likely know what happens, and it can lead to some slight...discomfort? Cap is definitely still fairly old fashioned as you put it, and simply wanted to be polite and not vulgar.


27

As explained by screenwriter Robert Gordon to MTV, there's no back story: Gordon: “By Grabthar’s Hammer” was a temp line. It was basically the Hammer of Thor, but Grabthar just sounded so silly. I kept meaning to change it, but around the production offices, they started to make t-shirts, it started to sink in a little bit. Rickman: The ending ...


24

It clearly looks like a continuity error, but if IMDb's Pulp Fiction FAQ page is to be believed: Why is what Yolanda says in the beginning different from what she says at the end? Tarantino has explained that this is not an error, rather, he did this on purpose. When we first examine the scene, we are seeing Ringo and Yolanda's conversation from ...


23

I believe the author left it up to interpretation, as I didn't find an "official" answer on the web. There's a FAQ on IMDB about a similar question, though the answer doesn't source anything. What is the meaning of "Chinatown" and the last line of the movie? As a young man, Jake was a police officer in Chinatown. He once tried to protect a woman, ...


23

Irina Spalko was a KGB operative communist working for the Soviet Union. She was attempting to obtain the Crystal Skull in order to give the USSR an advantage over the Americans. Ike was a nickname for President Dwight D. Eisenhower, staunch opponent of communism. "I like Ike" was one of his campaign slogans. From the screenplay: The barrel of Mac’s ...


23

As noted in other answers, it's wordplay and emphasizes how strange the Joker himself is. But the literal meaning of the expression is also important; to me, it seems quite reasonable to assume that the Joker really does believe that traumatic experiences ("whatever doesn't kill you") can push people to extremes and cause them to abandon social norms ("makes ...


23

This quote is from the beginning of The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, when Bilbo first meets Gandalf (a character much similar to Dumbledore in looks and demeanor) in front of his house: Bilbo: Good morning. Gandalf: What do you mean? Do you mean to wish me a good morning or do you mean that it is a good morning whether I want it or not? Or perhaps ...


22

I think it's important to look at (one of) the Joker's origin stories. From The Killing Joke: You see it doesn't matter if you catch me and send me back to the asylum... [...] I've proved my point. I've demonstrated there's no difference between me and everyone else! All it takes is one bad day to reduce the sanest man alive to lunacy. That's how far the ...


22

First off, since you mentioned the comics: in the original comic string, this is not a line spoken by Uncle Ben. Rather, it's an unspoken caption on one of the panels (that is, it's not actually spoken by any character.) However, in later comics, Peter's flashbacks to the days when Ben is alive have shown him saying it, which is where the movies drew their ...


22

You seem to mean this dialogue from the season 9 opener: Frasier: Niles, listen, I didn't want to say anything in front of the others, but I find myself in a bit of a quandary. Well, it's not so much a quandary, really, it's more of a pickle. Well, not so much a pickle, but well, no more than a... cornichon. Niles: What is it? Frasier: I think ...


21

This is most likely just Ramsay saying that he has changed Sansa. She's no longer the same person she was before marrying Ramsay, and so he 'is a part of her'. Iwan Rheon (Ramsay Bolton) supports this explanation in the quote below: "What he's saying to her," he says, "is that his mind, his mark, will be on her. Very much like if you look at Theon now,...


20

As far as I can tell, it comes from The Untouchables film. Films According to searches at Subzin, The Untouchables was the first with this line, but has been emulated in at least 20 other films since 2000. The Untouchables (1987) 01:21:23 Brings a knife to a gunfight. The Target Shoots First (2000) 00:17:38 What are you doing, Max? Bringing a knife to a ...


20

From Despicable Me - Creating The Minions: The [directors] subsequently designed a language for Gru’s army that is intended to be an indescribable vocal expression "The language is much more about sound than it is about any kind of meaning," says [producer] Christopher Meledandri. Here you can watch a short featurette where producer John Cohen ...


20

While researching this question, I went to the Michael Scott page on Wiki. In the section of (the character) Scott's interests, it states that: Michael's favorite catchphrase is "That's what she said!", a sexually suggestive double entendre he uses even in the most inappropriate circumstances, including business meetings and legal depositions. Michael ...


19

I believe he actually said, "Obi-Wan killed your father." I'll go find some proof. From Wikipedia: *In the original film, Skywalker is told by Obi-Wan Kenobi that his father, Anakin Skywalker, was betrayed and murdered by Kenobi's own apprentice, Darth Vader. However, in The Empire Strikes Back, Vader himself reveals that he is actually Anakin. According ...


19

Edit: Now we know. In an interview revealed at Total Film with Dr. Anil Biltoo: Well, according to Dr. Anil Biltoo, the film’s official translator and linguistics consultant, David did as he was asked, translating his words as follows: “This man is here because he does not want to die. He believes you can give him more life.” The rest of the text of ...


19

First time John McClane uses that term in the Die Hard series is when he speaks to Hans on walkie talkie. When Hans was asking him if he was another American cowboy inspired by John Wayne and then McClane says he is partial to Roy Rogers and ends his conversation with Yippie Kay Yay and swears after it. The actual meaning of the phrase from the references ...


19

It's not "icksnay". It's "ixney", which is "nix", as in stop talking about it. He's telling them not to mention his real name in front of the woman he's trying to fool.


19

It is important to note a few things. Airplane! is a satirical comedy, and the writers were making a joke about language. Jive shares traits with African American Vernacular English (AAVE), but it is not the same. The writers and actors have said that Jive was fabricated, which can be seen in the video here. All of what the Jivemen said was a fabrication of ...


19

The way I understood it is thus: Beth has just realized that Dawn's power lies completely in making others subservient to her, and Dawn knows it. Dawn needs a ward who will listen to her and obey her. Noah filled that part prior to Beth's arrival. When Noah escapes, Dawn now needs to bind Beth to her, so she starts being nicer to her, covering up for her ...


19

This is really two questions, so I'll answer it in two parts. The question of legitimization, I believe, is pretty clearly answered: only a King can do so. In the novels, for example, Roose Bolton's son is legitimized by Tommen, though I don't know if that's made as clear in the show. In either case, "King" Robb legitimized Jon Snow before he died, when he ...



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