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31

That gate to Moria was created in the "Second Age" of Middle Earth, and was used to trade mithril with the Noldorian Elves of Hithlum. Relations between the Elves and the Dwarves were more cordial in the Second Age. The inscription and password on the gate created by Celebrimbor, the leader of the Elves of Noldor, hence is in elvish. Celebrimbor also ...


29

As I remember she said "bozhe moi"(Боже мой) which would be "My God" or better put "Oh My god!" and obviously it is Russian. To hear it pronounced Google translate


24

In order for a film to get a 12A or PG-13 rating, it cannot contain gratuitous use of profanity: One 'Fuck' is allowed, anymore and it automatically becomes a 15 or R rated. That article features a very humorous piece of meta-textuality, referring to the Movie Be Cool, in which budding film producer Chili Palma states: “Do you know that unless you're ...


18

While researching this question, I went to the Michael Scott page on Wiki. In the section of (the character) Scott's interests, it states that: Michael's favorite catchphrase is "That's what she said!", a sexually suggestive double entendre he uses even in the most inappropriate circumstances, including business meetings and legal depositions. Michael ...


17

From Despicable Me - Creating The Minions: The [directors] subsequently designed a language for Gru’s army that is intended to be an indescribable vocal expression "The language is much more about sound than it is about any kind of meaning," says [producer] Christopher Meledandri. Here you can watch a short featurette where producer John Cohen ...


17

It's not "icksnay". It's "ixney", which is "nix", as in stop talking about it. He's telling them not to mention his real name in front of the woman he's trying to fool.


16

The script used for the fake film project was based on the 1967 science fiction novel "Lord of Light" by Roger Zelazny. In real life, makeup artist John Chambers (played by John Goodman) came up with the title "Argo" because he loved knock-knock jokes. In the film, the title becomes an off-color joke. - (Source:IMDb) From urbandictionary ...


16

I found this interview with the writer and director, Rian Johnson in which he explains it: Could you explain " '78 Caddy? Controversial choice."? Rian Johnson: That was one of the first cars I owned after college. And the "controversial choice" was something a friend of mine used to say, and you would never know whether it was a diss or compliment. ...


15

Switching between languages is a trick which gives a sense of authenticity to the movie, without having to translate the entire film. There are actually three ways to manage different languages in a movie: Using only one language and making the foreigners speaks with a different accent Using every language when required, adding subtitles to the foreign ...


14

It's simple, really. What most screenwriters do is to write the entire script in the same language (which, in the case of Hollywood movies, is English) and then when there's a piece of dialog that's supposed to be spoken in some other language, say, French, all you do is to tell the reader this by adding a parenthesis between the character's name and the ...


14

The answer depends very much on the circumstances. If you hear the character's voice, but none of the other characters do, it's a voiceover. If multiple characters are conversing without speaking aloud, it's telepathy. If the character is intentionally throwing his voice (multiple characters can hear him, but he isn't moving his lips), it's ventriloquism. ...


13

The line is indeed Mommy, as you can see from the script in scene 199:


12

I thought it was closer to "Боже мой" - an interjection "Oh goodness", "Oh my", or "My God" - but its the same sort of thing. "бог"(bog) would be Russian for God, but I think she definitely says "Боже мой" (bozhe moi). Though essentially they mean the same thing.


12

I believe the author left it up to interpretation, as I didn't find an "official" answer on the web. There's a FAQ on IMDB about a similar question, though the answer doesn't source anything. What is the meaning of "Chinatown" and the last line of the movie? As a young man, Jake was a police officer in Chinatown. He once tried to protect a woman, ...


12

If I remember correctly he says "Put me in a coma, why don't ya?" It has nothing to do with Walt being sick. This was a flashback to their very first cook together. As Jesse was a former student in Walt's chemistry class, they very much had a teacher/student relationship. Jesse had cooked before and thought he knew everything about the process. When Walt ...


12

In a conversation between A and B, "that's what she said" is a (very informal!) phrase B would use to give A's (harmless) statement an unexpected dirty meaning not indended by A. It is implied that the "she" said this during/before/after sexual or related activity. As an example: A is unsuccessfully trying to push a thick folder into an overfull shelf, ...


11

Well, I don't remember the scene exactly, but I'm pretty sure, that this was meant rather sarcastic. Latin is really not an easy language and has a rather complex grammar. Besides that it's not really spoken in everyday life anymore and only read from ancient texts or used in quite specialized contexts (law and medical terms, recitated prayers), but not ...


11

I think the actor and director were trying to honor Alan Moores depiction of the character(s). I don't remember the difference (if any) between the presentation of Kovacs and Rorschach in the film. But in the comic there is a difference. The answer to this question is shown gradually. But I think the answer is: From April 1966 - 1975 Kovacs was playing at ...


11

The way I understood it is thus: Beth has just realized that Dawn's power lies completely in making others subservient to her, and Dawn knows it. Dawn needs a ward who will listen to her and obey her. Noah filled that part prior to Beth's arrival. When Noah escapes, Dawn now needs to bind Beth to her, so she starts being nicer to her, covering up for her ...


10

I think the soldier says, "I can't get used to the new regs" as in regulations. It's referring to Neville's (Will Smith's) beard that he has in the flashback. The "new regs" are likely to prohibit shaving with a razor in order to prevent open sores that could lead to infection by the virus.


9

It's highly likely that the the quote originated from 'The Dark Knight' movie. Apparently Batman (and other super-heros) was inspired by Friedrich Nietzsche, a German philosopher. A lot of aspects of Batman are inspired by Nietzsche's beliefs which would explain why the movies seem very philosophical at times. Along with the fact that there seem to be no ...


9

I'm afraid there is no "single original language". Actors performed using each one their own original language and then the movie was dubbed in the countries as necessary: in Italy, the english and spanish actors, in the U.S. the spanish actors and so on. Not even in the Italian version the lips are always synced so it's the same situation for everyone. You ...


9

They were anthropomorphing the city of Bangkok for effect. In other words they were talking about the city as if it was a person. Bangkok has a certain reputation for lawlessness (true or not). So when Teddy was lost in Bangkok, some people thought that he was lost for good and that his friends will never find him again. Bangkok has caught Teddy, and is not ...


9

Napoleon Bonaparte was a notorious womanizer, and his antics have been recorded in numerous books and documentaries. According to 'Napoleon and his Women', by British historian Christopher Hibbert, Napoleon would often weaponize his sexual experiences for leverage and political power, making him effectively a gigolo, although its a stretch to apply this ...


9

TL; DR There is strong evidence that he says something along the lines of: "Thank you, thank you very much". Long answer The script (if we assume it is legit) differs from the scene in some significant points, which seems to indicate that part of that scene was either improvised or rewritten on set. Some differences: Script: WILLIE: (quietly) God, I ...


9

As a native Turkish speaker, let me answer your question. The bartender says (in Turkish) - Sorun değil which means - No problem.


9

As for official sources, both the actress and an executive producer offered their opinion on the matter. Says Walking Dead executive producer Gale Anne Hurd: She gets that Dawn was the kind of person who made up the rules as she went along. She would do anything to not only survive, but to maintain power. There is no negotiating with someone like that, ...


8

After watching that clip, I have one more theory. Since it was Irene that calls Holmes away from the fight, it is possible that he is reminding himself to not let his feelings/emotions for Irene get the best of him and allow him to make a mistake. He says this before plotting out his attack pattern on his target to clear his mind and focus on taking this ...


8

Could be "good evening" in German (Google pronunciation - it's a bit mechanical). Compare to Bond in this video at 32:22. Really hard to tell.


8

A big indicator of success is arguably wealth, and a big indicator of wealth is conspicuous consumption, i.e public displays of luxury items/expensive goods. A lot of very shallow, very vain wealthy people believe that it is appropriate (and important) to publicly and conspicuously display items that immediately indicate their financial/social status; such ...



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