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31

The original phrase is by Friedrich Nietzsche, in his book Twilight of the Idols: From life's school of war: what does not kill me makes me stronger This means that every experience in life makes you a stronger, more rounded person. Joker's phrase is obviously a word play on this, as other answered have already identified, but to give some more reasons ...


23

The people of Gotham City faced a very hard time. The mob was still on its height and was only slowly taken its powers (to a large part by Harvey Dent), there was corruption all over the governmental institutions. While the Batman did his best to fight crime, it was still a very dark situation when a masked vigilante has to do what the police and the ...


18

As noted in other answers, it's wordplay and emphasizes how strange the Joker himself is. But the literal meaning of the expression is also important; to me, it seems quite reasonable to assume that the Joker really does believe that traumatic experiences ("whatever doesn't kill you") can push people to extremes and cause them to abandon social norms ("makes ...


15

From a legal perspective, it's worth noting that the criminals he's referring to aren't those that Dent has already convicted in the past but the 549 criminals that Dent convinced Commissioner Gordon to arrest in scene 91. Not only are the criminals involved not yet convicted (far from it) but Dent makes it abundantly clear to the Mayor that the only reason ...


11

I think it's important to look at (one of) the Joker's origin stories. From The Killing Joke: You see it doesn't matter if you catch me and send me back to the asylum... [...] I've proved my point. I've demonstrated there's no difference between me and everyone else! All it takes is one bad day to reduce the sanest man alive to lunacy. That's how far the ...


11

Some obvious, important quotes: Introduce a little anarchy. Upset the established order, and everything becomes chaos. I'm an agent of chaos. Oh, and you know the thing about chaos? It's fair! Don't talk like one of them, you're not! Even if you'd like to be. To them, you're just a freak, like me. They need you right now. But when they don't, they'll cast ...


8

Why he chose to name himself two face seems relatively straight forward, after the injuries sustained (predominately to his face) during the explosion and subsequent conversation with Commissioner Gordon in which it is revealed that members of the major crimes unit were calling him "Two-Face". Harvey is obviously upset that Batman chose to save his life ...


8

The Joker chose all three (Harvey, the Batman, and Jim Gordon), each in his own way, but only Harvey fell completely. Harvey was attacked through the loved one, done by kidnapping and murder. The Joker gave the Batman switched locations, because he knew that the Batman would go after Rachel (The way you threw yourself after her), so with one move he ...


7

The Joker was a disciple of chaos, and wanted to prove that anyone - especially Batman, disciple of law - were as ready to abandon law and morality as he had already done. He had the robbers progressively executing each other in the opening scene. He forced Batman to choose between Harvey Dent and his girlfriend. He went to Harvey in the hospital room ...


5

In the movies no one actually refused to be Robin. Nor do we see Bruce Wayne even contemplate the notion of having a side kick. This is due to a creative decision by Nolan (the director), who has stated many times that he does not want Robin to be part of the triology. Which is understandable. Robin is a very hard character to get into the movies. Having a ...


5

It's word play. "What doesn't kill you makes you stronger," is the familiar phrase. In the Joker's case he was hinting at the fact that his past troubles have messed him up.


4

The final fate of Chechen was not shown directly/indirectly in the movie. I think, it was left for audience to think what would have happened to him. IMO, Joker's men would've handed him his fate, which was ordered by Joker


4

It was a simple wordplay. He took a very famous and often used phrase (that you correctly identified in your question) and made it, well, stranger. This is just the Joker's kind of humour, especially when seeing that he has a thing for taking the normal and driving it ad absurdum. So I'm not sure he intended anything else than being funny and, uh, strange.


3

There is no reference to her again, but as you have yourself noted, the coin lands on the unscarred side, meaning Dent wouldn't have killed her. At least not directly. Dent is bound by his preference for the determination of fate by fate, abandoning this would undermine the sanctimonious crusade he has embarked upon, and would also invite his own ...


3

This is an old thread and I assume you've already turned in your paper, but it's an interesting question so I wanted to share an answer. Like many good movies, The Dark Knight has several themes, but to me the primary theme of the movie is duty. The reason why I say this is because the primary conflicts of the film are centered around that theme: Joker - ...


2

The death of Harvey Dent was going to be a huge blow to the city. Harvey had gotten rid of virtually all of corrupt crime in Gotham. Once word got out that he was dead, the public (I.E. the various newspapers, magazines and who knows who else) would naturally want to know the circumstances of his death. It would soon get out that Harvey had killed Maroni ...


2

I think that the question "why did a self-sacrificing hero (which the Batman surely is) take the blame instead of framing somebody else?" doesn't make sense. To ask such a question properly, I think you'd have to make out a feasible alternative plan, taking into the account the current circumstances and the need to rig any evidence to fit Maroni and plenty ...


2

His fate in the movie is intentionally left as ambiguous, but there's some implying by Jim Gordon later that Harvey killed five people, so Maroni could be one of the five. However, in the comics (specifically Batman: The Long Halloween, which served as influence in some ways for the Batman films directed by Nolan) Maroni is the one responsible for ...


1

For the joker, who believes he is immortal, or at least behaves as if he is, life would be boring without chaos, the strange, or unexpected is the root of chaos. The more chaos, the more victorious or strong he feels. Nothing seems to kill him, so whatever entertaining means that others use in attempts to kill him only satisfy him in watching the chaos. ...


1

It's really one of the main themes of "The Dark Knight." Like Hammer said, Batman and Commissioner Gordon both knew that this had to happen. You may have heard Commissioner Gordon say something like "He's not the hero they want, but he's the hero they need," referring to Harvey Dent. In other words, the implication is that the average citizen would want ...


1

What did the Joker want to prove? The long answer: “You only have power over people as long as you don't take everything away from them. But when you've robbed a man of everything, he's no longer in your power--he's free again.” ― Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn When people are attached to things (e.g. Batman to Rachel (and his rules), Harvey Dent to fairness, the ...



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