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31

Why don't they get script writers to stick to the comic book facts? And what comic book facts are these, exactly? Marvel have repeatedly ret-conned and rebooted the majority of their characters at some point in the past: even within the same Universe its almost impossible to find a character with a totally non-contradictory history. There have been ...


30

Batman Begins is a combination of stories from the Batman mythos, as well as an original story. According to Wikipedia, the starting point for Batman Begins was a story called "The Man Who Falls"; Jim Gordon was based on the character from the story "Batman: Year One". Neither of these stories featured Ra's Al Ghul, who is a significantly different character ...


17

OK here's my stab at this question. There are a lot of differences between the book and the movie, and if I was to use a term to collectively describe these differences I would say narration density. Watchmen is a rather dense book that effectively uses it's panels to tell several tangential stories. That's very hard for the film medium to achieve. Let's ...


15

Ok, I'll attempt an answer, based only on the movie (not the comics) and my small bit of knowledge about Norse mythology (paired with up-to-date Wiki-research). First of all the movie depicts the gods as being just a kind of powerful aliens (wandering on the same paths as Stargate and its farther-in-spirit Erich von Däniken already did). Indeed this isn't ...


14

The movie is based largely on the Knightfall series of comics where Bane is highly intelligent. On his wiki one of his abilities is "Genius Level Intellect". As to his meticulous controlling personality, the early versions of Bane were just this. Bane creator Chuck Dixon's early tales portray Bane as a very calm, centered warrior akin to Bruce Lee in ...


14

Agent Sitwell (Hydra) mentions Tony Stark, Bruce Banner, and Stephen Strange by name. We know Stark and Banner are Iron Man and the Hulk. Most comics fans will also recognize the name Stephen Strange as Dr. Strange, the Sorcerer Supreme. Sitwell also mentions "an honor student in Iowa City" and a man located in Cairo, Egypt. I don't get the Iowa City ...


14

X-Men (1st series) # 20: (May 1966) Years ago, Xavier discovered a city in Tibet being under some sort of alien mind-control. The professor managed to inspire a rebellion against Lucifer, and the alien was forced to abandon his base, however not before causing a block of concrete to fall and crush Xavier’s legs.


13

To answer your main question, X-Men First Class is based before X-Men Origins. X-Men First Class is based in the 60s. In 1962, the United States government enlists the help of Mutants with superhuman abilities to stop a malicious dictator who is determined to start world war III. In Origins, Striker doesn't approach Wolverine until the 70s. ...


13

There are indeed comments from various of the filmmakers why they went in this direction. The overall tenor of those comments has been nailed by you in the question already, though. It was for the same reason that Ra's Al Ghul's regeneration and resurrection abilities have been reduced to trickery, allusions and a mere philosophical immortality of his ...


13

TL;DR: Yes. Note: This answer has so many spoilers that it doesn't make sense to hide them all, and there is a bit of gore. If you don't like spoilers or gore, you might want to skip this answer (although if you don't like gore, you probably don't watch The Walking Dead anyway) Identical deaths: Amy: Bitten on the neck by a zombie. Jim: ...


11

Zack Snyder (the film director) has stated that Batman v Superman would take inspiration from the Frank Miller comic, The Dark Knight Returns.1 The biggest deal was, Snyder brought out Man of Steel actor Harry Lennix (General Swanwick) to use his cool voice to read the following piece of dialogue: "I want you to remember, Clark…in all the years ...


10

No, Dredd 3D is not an adaptation or inspired by a specific storyline. Alex Garland did consider adapting one of the more well known Judge Dredd storylines such as Origins, but decided that that he would not adapt such a big epic and instead went for an approach of writing an original story - a kind of 'day in the life of Judge Dredd'. You can read more ...


7

There can be numerous reasons. You have to remember that media like TV shows and film have to cover stories in a far more restricted timeframe than print media can. This means they can't dwell on story lines or certain characters for too long. This May result in shallower character development, characters being dropped, added, or altered. You may also have ...


7

In a Screen Rant article with the title "Zack Snyder’s ‘Superman’ Not Based on Comics", Rob Keyes noted that director Zack Snyder has previously been known for making quite literal adaptations of his source material. But this film is different: With the Superman reboot however, Snyder will take a different route and will instead deliver a new origin ...


7

The TV show actually uses a similar origin story to the very first Green Arrow comics from the DC 'Golden Age'. The only major difference is that in the comic, Oliver Queen was actually the boy's father, Green Arrow himself being Roy Harper. Here is a quick rundown of the original comic book story from the DC database: Roy Harper was a young boy whose ...


6

It's going to be a bit hard to tell because Gotham has only had one episode, but I'd say, so far, that it's probably not really faithful to any particular story that's already been done. There will likely be homages or references, but so far it doesn't seem to be adhering to any particular story line, at least not strictly. Examples: Edward Nigma, aka ...


6

As far as I can make out, the first feature length film based off a comic strip was Little Annie Rooney (1925) starring Mary Pickford. There were certainly other shorts made before then, going back as far as 1898, but you specified over 40 mins in length.


6

Very short answer: It tried harder to be different and more "grown-up. (I'm sure we'll get some thesis-level answer, but this is a few bullet-points just to get the ball rolling.) The cover is page one, panel one. That was new. And they played more with transitions between panels and pages, using composition and dialogue / sound to blend the elements into a ...


6

The stories of all the three movies incorporate many influences from famous comic storylines, while none of them has been directly taken from a particular comic in its entirety. So they were more or less written from scratch a bit but also not completey without base in some particular comics. The primary influence, maybe less storywise than more ...


5

With the Hellboy comics, the writers have the advantage of having (as of now) 10 years to be able to write a compelling story with believable characters; with the Movie, the writers are limited to two hours, they have to make you believe that these people are real people with emotions and feelings similar to ours. And it is easier for most people to ...


4

Varies greatly depending on era. Green Arrow comics span decades, with different writers, multiverse plot lines, and different incarnations/reboots of the DC universe. In general, some things are keep the same, some are spiced up for tv formatting. There are Arrow-verse tie-in comic series that are closer to the show, naturally, while some aspects of the ...


4

Roy Harper is the real name of the comic character that has been known as Speedy (November 1941), Arsenal (July 1993) and Red Arrow (May 2007), aliases used as part of his sidekick duties to the Green Arrow, as well as lone hero. He goes under the same names in the Justice League/Unlimited and Young Justice cartoons. Arrow-verse Roy has used the name ...


3

This is a great question and timely as I just acquired Zack Snyder's attempt at adapting these books to film. As mentioned in another response the symmetrical panel layout with a larger center panel is something that can only be appreciated when reading the source material vs film. I thought it would be nice to have an example below. Another similar ...


3

They may have forged a new approach not based specifically on one book, but as the article here notes, some dialogue and scenes were adapted from "Superman: Earth One", John Byrne's Superman run, "Superman: Birthright" and "All-Star Superman".


3

There is always a gap to bridge when adapting a book/comic/graphic novel into a TV show. A graphic novel is not addressing the same audience as the TV show. There is even a difference between the ways such literary works are adapted for Movies and TV shows. Given the episodic release format for the shows spanning over different seasons, the makers try to ...


2

One key difference: Both of the protagonists in the 2 Gun series are White. Reference: http://www.comicbookmovie.com/fansites/GraphicCity/news/?a=76645


2

From the X Men: First Class article on Wikipedia: Goldman added the film was kind of an "alternate history" for the X-Men, saying that while rebooting the writers did not want to go fully "against the canon of the X-Men trilogy", comparing to the various approaches the comic had in over fifty years of publication. This lines from wiki says that ...


2

The existing answers here have already provided some very good insights into the particular advantages of the comic medium due to its different structural form of storytelling, which I guess to a large degree come down to the comic's discrete presentation and the customizable pacing of its consuption. In addition to that I would like to approach this from ...


2

I don't know of a team in the comics with that particular ensemble (Firestorm, The Atom, White Canary, Rip Hunter, Hawkgirl, Heatwave, and Captain Cold). It looks like an original work based on characters that were already introduced in the CW's other shows, Flash and Arrow, with the exception of Rip Hunter, who is a new character to TV. The concept looks ...


1

The most strict answer would be: Not really faithful A better answer would be: It has the main point the same. There are tremendous differences between the comic and the TV adaptation, but they haven't got off track (that much). There people that have died in the show, that are still alive in the comic and people (like Daryl) that don't exist at all in ...



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