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42

The "Mike Yaganita" subplot is discussed on the Subplot Screenwriting Tips page, and a blog commenter writes: (Source: Kathleen A. Ryan) Every time my husband and I watch FARGO (we own the DVD, & are huge Coen bros. fans), we have the same conversation about the purpose of the subplot you mention. My guess, however, is this: Marge is presented ...


14

Larry did, in fact, steal The Dude's car. Larry stole the car, and took it for a joy-ride, then abandoned it. The homework was in there simply because Larry wasn't terribly smart, and didn't seem to particularly care about getting caught. The theft caused The Dude and Walter a great deal of stress simply because they had not yet realized that Lebowski ...


10

Two answers from Newsweek and Language Log When asked why they chose to follow the diction of the book and lack of contractions Ethan Coen said We’ve been told that the language and all that formality is faithful to how people talked in the period. As to whether or not people actually talked like that Mark Liberman of the University of Pennsylvania ...


7

This took some hunting, since the Coen Brothers are notoriously interview-shy, but the answer to your question would be No. The Coen Brothers find inspiration from a wide range of sources, more often classic movies than classic literature. From a variety of web-based reviews and sources: Blood Simple - the works of crime fiction writer James M McCain ...


6

As far as I remember it was the kid. This actually happened in real life to a friend of the Coen Brothers, Peter Exline: Funny how a dinner story can wind up on the movie screen. Back in '89 Joel and Ethan Coen were in town shooting “Barton Fink,” and I had them over for dinner. The neighbors had moved out and left behind a rug, which I appropriated for ...


6

From an interview with Richard Kelly (writer/director of Donnie Darko): Can you explain the character of Cherita [Chen]? I like to call her my ‘Mike Yanagita.’ Remember Mike Yanagita from “Fargo?” He hits on Frances McDormand at the Radisson. They have Diet Cokes at the Radisson and he comes on to her. If the Coen Bros. didn’t have final cut, a ...


6

No, it's not really related to the plot. The only thing that happens is the dude's car getting smashed. It is however related to the theme of the movie: mistaken identity.


5

Not really. First of all, just about everyone involved brought about this complex situation. Everyone's (usually misguided) choices - Bunny, the Dude, the big Lebowski and the nihilists themselves - put the nihilists in that parking lot, so everyone would be responsible for Donny's death. And we don't even know Donny's prior health condition. In short, you ...


4

I agree with the comment that Mike's convincing lying points out to Marge that Jerry may be lying too, and so the second interview with Jerry, where Jerry becomes less and less convincing ("I'm cooperating here") under Marge's polite but insistent questioning. But I think there is something else. Consider the consecutive scenes where the criminals are ...


4

Having read the book, I was under the impression it was the Mexicans who took the heroin, that is, the same guys who chase Moss after he returns to the cars in the night. When Moss first finds the cars and the drugs, it is clear that he doesn't take the heroin with him: "He wet his forefinger and dipped it in the powder and smelled it. Then he wiped his ...


3

Walter owns his own security store. He is clearly in front of Sobchak Security store when The Dude picks him up to go pay the ransom. The fact that he is a Viet Nam vet, is into arms, interrogation, and security is exceedingly important to the movie. As for Donny's day job, I have no clue. Great question though.


3

I think she's a little more Columbo than Mason (and I just happened to reach it as I also have a copy). I think she is flattered when Mike calls her because she makes a side trip to meet him while on business in the Twin Cities, and when she goes into the restraunt to meet him for lunch, she makes a point of straightening out her clothes (the most feminine ...


1

I don't think the Mike Yanagita subplot advances the plot at all. Some of the things said above don't add up. What brings Marge back to the car dealership isn't renewed suspicion of Jerry, but the fact that records showed that the perpetrators called Shep Proudfoot, who works there. When she goes back to Jerry, she seems as credulous as ever, but she does ...



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