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14

Do you define bullet time as slow motion bullet dodging, or the spinny effect from multiple cameras in an arc? There's a slow motion scene in the first Blade film where you can see the bullets moving through the air, giving the target enough time to reacting and move out of way. Blade came out in 1998, a year before The Matrix. It's in the scene in ...


9

From the article "Lighting and Meaning in Kurosawa's Rashomon" by Asa Fitch (1998) http://www.carleton.edu/curricular/MEDA/classes/media110/Fitch.removed/Articles/paper.html The effect of pointing the camera right at the sun in this scene and in others is an innovation in cinematography. Until Rashomon was made, pointing the camera directly at the sun was ...


6

It's hard to be objective when answering this question as I personally hate this kind of camera work (out of context), but in general, 'swaying' shots and 'shaky-cam' fall under the same catch-all monicker of 'hand-held'. First used to simulate the hand-held appearance of news reel footage in pseudo-documentaries, the camera form had a resurgence in the ...


4

This is what you're after: Into the Wild Visual Effects. It is an interview with Jay Cassidy, who served as Editor for the film. Quoting part of the article: From Close-up to Aerial in One Seamless Shot The final moving shot starts out on a close-up Hirsch’s face... in the bus then pulls back through the window and rises up over the bus and ...


4

Opinion-based, but one of the major themes in House of Cards is control of information. The Underwoods thrive because they are able to conceal their own intentions, find out as much as possible about their targets and feed the proper information to proxies like Zoe, Stamper or Russo. Although I can't think of specific examples off the top of my head, ...


4

TLDR: From Iron Man 3 onwards, at least, Illustrator, Cinema 4D and After Effects were used. Long Answer: I can't find too much information about Iron Man 1 or 2, but in Iron Man 3 and beyond what you are referring to is the Heads Up Display, created by 3D designer Jayse Hansen. From his website (which is offline at time of writing, but can be accessed ...


4

There doesn't appear to be any official rating system, disappointingly. As a previous user @Pubby answered, what you are referring to is the "depth" of the film (as per Wikipedia): Depth perception is the visual ability to perceive the world in three dimensions (3D) and the distance of an object. A few websites have had users try and champion a ...


4

The term would be depth (or rather, the illusion of depth), although I haven't seen any actual ratings of it. Films that really seem to pop are generally filmed in 3D and then enhanced post-production when adding in special effects.


4

Cross fades and pans are more common in (low budget) television for some reason, and even more common in home video—I have my theories about the causes, but that does not affect this question. View any quality movie and you'll see that almost every cut (99+%) is a classic straight cut. For extra effect, maybe there is a fade to black or fade from ...


3

4:3 aspect ratio is in the market since the early days of television. 16:9 came into picture more recently. It is true that 16:9 is becoming more and more popular now a days. But we have not reached the time to forget about them. 4:3: Standard 4:3 format aspect ratio A standard aspect ratio television screen is a TV with a resolution that matches the ...


3

Thats a very interesting question. Though I couldn't find a precise answer, here are some interesting takes on t he subject that I learned while researching. From this article on wikipedia: A feature film is a film that runs for 40 minutes or longer, according to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, American Film Institute, and British ...


3

Grand Prix (1966) contains some short shots like this (watch the trailer closely). Likewise Città violenta (1970), The Cars That Ate Paris (1974), Death Race 2000 (1975), The Gumball Rally (1976) and The Spy Who Loved Me (1977).


3

Slow motion video is recorded in a rate higher than the playback rate (Ben already explained the details). When taking a still image (but it corresponds to video) there are 3 parameters: exposure time lens aperture sensor/film sensitivity Modifying these 3 will result in certain effects: motion or shake blur vs more "frozen" action more vs less depth ...


2

slow motion happens by filming at a higher frames per second (FPS) than the playback on a projector happens. What you're talking about is a high speed camera, designed to capture more FPS than a standard camera. If a high speed camera records at 240 FPS and play back runs at 24 FPS, then what took 1 second to record will talk 10 seconds to watch, and be very ...


2

History of theatre: Appears the Greeks liked full-length dramas, though the Romans did not; which is to say that the idea of "full-length" is very old, and it's likely impossible to know the reasoning behind story lengths 1000s of years ago. First feature length films: Historic Context: The first feature length film was The Story of the Kelly Gang, ...


2

I think that the first recorded use of bullet time was in Kill and kill again in 1981. Here is a link to the wiki entry: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kill_and_Kill_Again Here is a summary of what wiki says about it: The bullet-time scene occurs at the end, when Marduk has died and his chief guard is about to kill Dr. Kane while Steve is climbing up ...



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