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42

The Shining used the then newly-invented device called a Steadicam to shoot these (and many other) scenes: This film was among the first half-dozen to use the newly developed Steadicam (after the 1976 films Bound for Glory, Marathon Man, and Rocky), and was Kubrick's first use of it. This is a stabilizing mount for a motion picture camera, which ...


36

This will be achieved through a series of shots. Let's pretend you want to show a scene where two people are talking in a diner - here is the classic way to go about it. First you shoot an establishing shot of the whole room - your actors can perform the whole scene and it doesn't matter if they mess up, as you will not be using the dialogue from this shot ...


23

Do you define bullet time as slow motion bullet dodging, or the spinny effect from multiple cameras in an arc? There's a slow motion scene in the first Blade film where you can see the bullets moving through the air, giving the target enough time to reacting and move out of way. Blade came out in 1998, a year before The Matrix. It's in the scene in ...


21

It's a technique called silver retention, also known as bleach bypass. To quote from Cinematography: Theory and Practice : Imagemaking for Cinematographers and Directors: Deluxe, another film lab with a long history in Hollywood, uses a process called Color Contrast Enhancement (or CCE). CCE raises the contrast, deepens the blacks, and adds grain ...


19

It's called Dolly Zoom (but there are a couple of alternate names for it) From MediaCollege: A dolly zoom is a cinematic technique in which the camera moves closer or further from the subject while simultaneously adjusting the zoom angle to keep the subject the same size in the frame. The effect is that the subject appears stationary while the ...


18

From the article "Lighting and Meaning in Kurosawa's Rashomon" by Asa Fitch (1998): The effect of pointing the camera right at the sun in this scene and in others is an innovation in cinematography. Until Rashomon was made, pointing the camera directly at the sun was unheard of. It did not occur to anyone that pointing the camera at the sun would do ...


17

Beginning in the late 1980s, Sony began marketing the concept of "electronic cinematography," utilizing its analog Sony HDVS professional video cameras. The effort met with very little success. In 1998, with the introduction of HDCAM recorders and 1920 × 1080 pixel digital professional video cameras based on CCD technology, the idea, now re-branded as ...


9

This type of shot is most commonly known as a Deep Focus Shot. From the wiki page: Deep focus is a photographic and cinematographic technique using a large depth of field. Depth of field is the front-to-back range of focus in an image — that is, how much of it appears sharp and clear. Consequently, in deep focus the foreground, middle-ground and background ...


9

As it turns out, it was expectedly not a single shot, but skilled editing of multiple continous tracking shots, some done with steadicam and some done with cranes (and a little bit of CGI). In fact it didn't even all take place in Mexico City but also partly in Pinewood Studios London. This is explained by the movie's cinematographer Hoyte van Hoytema in a ...


8

TLDR: From Iron Man 3 onwards, at least, Illustrator, Cinema 4D and After Effects were used. Long Answer: I can't find too much information about Iron Man 1 or 2, but in Iron Man 3 and beyond what you are referring to is the Heads Up Display, created by 3D designer Jayse Hansen. From his website (which is offline at time of writing, but can be accessed ...


8

This has to do with communicating to the viewer what the intended subject is, when the subject may be ambiguous among other things. A hunter is searching for his prey. A red bird sitting in an apple tree. He pans past several apples, then the bird and then returns to the bird. It's now clear that the red bird is not a red apple. While some viewers may ...


8

I think that the first recorded use of bullet time was in Kill and kill again in 1981. Here is a link to the wiki entry: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kill_and_Kill_Again Here is a summary of what wiki says about it: Kill and Kill Again is a 1981 South African/American action film notable for being the first live-action film to use the visual effects ...


8

Cross fades and pans are more common in (low budget) television for some reason, and even more common in home video—I have my theories about the causes, but that does not affect this question. View any quality movie and you'll see that almost every cut (99+%) is a classic straight cut. For extra effect, maybe there is a fade to black or fade from ...


6

There doesn't appear to be any official rating system, disappointingly. As a previous user @Pubby answered, what you are referring to is the "depth" of the film (as per Wikipedia): Depth perception is the visual ability to perceive the world in three dimensions (3D) and the distance of an object. A few websites have had users try and champion a ...


6

In addition to Mathew's answer, it might also be to emphasize that the searching person is indeed, well, searching and doesn't initially know where to look exactly. Directly moving its view to the target might on the other hand seem like he knew where to look all the time. So introducing this slight delay of recognition emphasizes the searching process. And ...


6

Opinion-based, but one of the major themes in House of Cards is control of information. The Underwoods thrive because they are able to conceal their own intentions, find out as much as possible about their targets and feed the proper information to proxies like Zoe, Stamper or Russo. Although I can't think of specific examples off the top of my head, ...


5

This is what you're after: Into the Wild Visual Effects. It is an interview with Jay Cassidy, who served as Editor for the film. Quoting part of the article: From Close-up to Aerial in One Seamless Shot The final moving shot starts out on a close-up Hirsch’s face... in the bus then pulls back through the window and rises up over the bus and ...


5

It's hard to be objective when answering this question as I personally hate this kind of camera work (out of context), but in general, 'swaying' shots and 'shaky-cam' fall under the same catch-all monicker of 'hand-held'. First used to simulate the hand-held appearance of news reel footage in pseudo-documentaries, the camera form had a resurgence in the ...


5

Fritz Lang was a perfectionist and the film was considered state-of-the-art regarding special effects. I have so far found nothing about that particular scene, but did find a few thing sthat could have worked. From the Metropolis wikipedia article, I found this reference to a camera on a swing Among the effects used are miniatures of the city, a ...


5

I don't know for sure, but I highly suspect those were created in a studio. There are 2 main reasons: The lighting is consistent. In the real world, the sun moves across the sky and shadows follow it. Clouds make intermittent shadows. The intensity of light changes at different times of day - dawn, noon, sunset, night. (I suppose that the filmmakers ...


5

I think what you might be driving at is something called "The Film Look", something that is instantly recognisable due to a combination of high-intensity lighting, fully focused camera shots and, most importantly, the frame and shutter speeds.


4

I don't think you can say that a color filter can be used to evoke a particular psychological effect in the viewer as a rule because the filter is always working in conjunction with environmental conditions (including artificial lighting). A yellow filter in one condition creates one effect and in another condition it does something else. More likely, a ...


4

There are lots of resources in YouTube which will teach you how to shoot any scene if you know what to type in the search box. To start google the terms in bold. If you shoot line by line, when you edit the clips together, you will have an unnaturally choppy conversation. The common way to do this is by letting the actors play the conversation while ...


4

Thats a very interesting question. Though I couldn't find a precise answer, here are some interesting takes on t he subject that I learned while researching. From this article on wikipedia: A feature film is a film that runs for 40 minutes or longer, according to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, American Film Institute, and British ...


4

The term would be depth (or rather, the illusion of depth), although I haven't seen any actual ratings of it. Films that really seem to pop are generally filmed in 3D and then enhanced post-production when adding in special effects.


4

As per the Trivia page for "Frenzy" on IMDB: Midway through the film, there is a famous continuous shot in which the camera backs away from the door of Rusk's upper-floor apartment and descends the staircase, seemingly without a cut, to the ground level, out the building's front door, and then to the opposite side of the street. The interiors were shot ...


4

After some searching, I found out it's a type of film transition called Graphic Match Cut. From Wikipedia: The cut joins together two pieces of film that contain two similarly shaped objects in similar positions in the frame. One of the most famous examples of this is the edit in Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey where the bone thrown by a ...


4

There's no actual trick here. The man is standing directly in front of the mirror (directly in front of her) but she's looking at the camera to make you think he's standing in front of the camera. The camera is off at a 60 degree (or so) angle from the mirror, so it would never catch itself in the frame. I've made an overhead view to help clarify it.


4

That's a method used to add camera shake (as @Catija suggested). The anti-shake features present on the cameras would otherwise make the effect have to be done in post-production, which is far more expensive.



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