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There's actually a new documentary just on this very subject, Lost Emulsion (2016). Here is a link to the trailer. A short answer is that nobody thought that people would be interested in most movies decades after they were made. Nitrate film, that was used for 35mm films up until about 1950, was very flammable, and there ...


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While certainly not the first remake, one of the most famous remakes of early silent cinema was of The Great Train Robbery (1903). The original film was a smash hit for nickelodeon audiences, and drew many people to movie theaters for the first time. Edison produced the original film. Siegmund Lubin owned a rival studio in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He ...


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Actually, a few early films ran at higher rates that 24 fps. The early color process Kinemacolor ran around 48 fps so that it could display red and green frames quickly for the illusion of color. The earliest films were shot at about 16 to 18 fps, because that is all that was required to reproduce motion without much flicker. Comedy producer Mack Sennett ...


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Source GIZMODO : Cinematic frame rates have been getting undercut by the economic interests of the moving-making industry. The earliest silent movies were shot at around 16 to 20 FPS—since that was the bare minimum that actually generated the continuous motion effect—but were also limited by the arm strength of the cameraman, who had to manually ...


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There's an interesting blog at Vanilla Video discussing this and state it is due to the hand-cranked nature of the projectors and cameras: The earliest cameras and projectors needed to be hand-cranked to advance the film through the gate. This lead to varying frame rates. Early silent films had frame rates from 14 – 26 frames per second, which was ...



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