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104

TLDR: There are plenty of films where the "bad guy" wins. Ultimately, the reason why the bad guy wins can come down to a number of reasons, including to be more realistic, to set up a later "good" ending in another film or because it's unexpected, to name a few reasons. Long Answer (note: there will be spoilers for some films below): There are really ...


70

Oh good lord, yes. List of lost films (Wikipedia) The Scorsese Film Foundation estimates that more than 90% of American films made before 1929 are totally lost. The Library of Congress estimates that 75% of all silent films are lost. Overall, 50% of American sound films made before 1950 are considered lost films. (film preservation) Films may go missing ...


62

I believe it is due to its great acting and very memorable plot. I'm not aware of any widely-used cinematic techniques that were invented due to the film. When the film was initially released, it struggled at the box office (it earned just $727,000 in its opening weekend). Despite this it received huge critical acclaim, garnered seven Oscar nominations ...


51

Well, in terms of the first motion picture ever - i.e. use of the technology to make a moving picture - the credit may go to one of two people. Eadweard Muybridge is credited with inventing the methodology of stringing several photos together to create a moving picture (and creating the technology to take rapid sequential photographs to make this method ...


37

I took the very unscientific approach of using Wikipedia and their List of biographical films. I then put all the information into a spreadsheet, removed a lot of annoying merged cells and came up with a list and turned this into a hopefully pretty graph: Using this, and ignoring non 20th/21st century people, it looks like Adolf Hitler and Albert ...


33

You asked a number of questions here; as often happens, not all of them got answered. Try to ask only one question per question. Are there actually rules, written or unwritten, preventing a script with victorious villains ever being made into a movie? Yes. Do a web search for the "Motion Picture Production Code", also known as the "Hays Code". If ...


29

There's an interesting blog at Vanilla Video discussing this and state it is due to the hand-cranked nature of the projectors and cameras: The earliest cameras and projectors needed to be hand-cranked to advance the film through the gate. This lead to varying frame rates. Early silent films had frame rates from 14 – 26 frames per second, which was ...


20

There are literally dozens of movies about Wong Fei-hung, who died in 1924 and therefore qualifies for your time range. Granted, most of those movies aren't well-known outside China / Hong Kong. And you might want to make a very close inspection before declaring that e.g. Iron Monkey (1993) is a "biographical" account of his childhood! So not all of them ...


19

For a writer, it's important to get your audience to care about your protagonist (whether they are good, bad, ugly, or neutral). If they don't care about and aren't interested in the protagonist, and their plight, then they're not going to care about your story. If you're thinking, well, I'll get the audience to care about the bad guy (etc.), then that ...


18

"Important"? I'm not sure it's really "important", but it's a great movie. It's a wonderfully crafted revenge story. And it's not a revenge you see coming. It's not obvious like "I Know What You Did Last Summer" or "I Spit On Your Grave". You don't even see it coming until it happens. People love a good revenge story. People want to see the good guy ...


16

At least 21 distinct Batmen across films, series and animated series where he is the dominant character. So, there have been 10 Batman films (11 if we include future releases). This number includes 3 serials. The films are: Batman (serial) [stars Lewis Wilson] Batman and Robin (serial) [stars Robert Lowery] Batman: The Movie [stars Adam West] Batman [...


13

The original version of Metropolis might count. Arguably it was completely lost (no copy exists), although there exist new restored versions of the movie from parts of it that remained. Keep in mind that new (restored) versions of the movie have had to completely refilm parts that no longer existed at all The Wikipedia page on the film says: Because of ...


13

The first, most prominent film that springs to my mind is Star Wars : The Empire Strikes Back. ** spoiler alert ** By the end, a Rebel base has been destroyed.. our hero Luke has just had his hand cut off, Han Solo is in frozen in carbonite. Darth Vader and the Emprire definitely have the upper hand. Of course this has to be viewed in the context of ...


11

Dead End (1985) Emerson Bixby the director of the movie says: "Dead End" was never released. I shot it on video with a budget of maybe fifteen hundred dollars, made several copies to send to small-time distribution companies, and nothing ever happened. None of the distributors responded, and the ten or so copies kept by myself and some of the crew are -...


11

The film Swordfish (2001) has part of its plot around this particular subject. The good guys always winning, the bad guy losing; and the whole idea is for the audience to feel happy. It's also an example of where arguably the bad guy does win. He does get to head off into the sunset having done what he intended. Okay, he paints himself as a good guy, but ...


10

From IMDb's own explanation, the following explains how their rankings are determined How do you calculate the rank of movies and TV shows on the Top 250 Rated Charts? The following formula is used to calculate the Top Rated 250 titles. This formula provides a true 'Bayesian estimate', which takes into account the number of votes each title ...


10

There is a tradition in storytelling that dictate that the bad guy "wins" in the end. This is mostly prevalent in horror/ghost stories and can be found in almost all human cultures. In most of these types of stories, the story structure is almost always a horror reveal where the story ends with the protagonist realising or confronting the real ghost/horror ...


9

The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance This is a truly great movie that I would recommend to anyone. Depending on your definition of "shot first" this movie might be on topic. As you can see this more of a "dry gulch" or assassination than a pure "shoot first" like when Indiana Jones brought a gun to a sword fight. The Sons of Katie Elder Here is another ...


9

First one that comes to mind is The Usual Suspects Without giving it away, the plot takes you in one direction, before an abrupt (and clever) plot twist, and the result is that the main villain (Keyser Soze) wins. We don't tend to get stories with the villan as winner, we tend to follow the heroic character and so invest feelings in them.


8

I haven't seen it to confirm that every single actor is a little person, but The Terror of Tiny Town is the film that comes immediately to mind.


8

You are 100% correct. According to this excellent article on Kotaku, pretty much everything most people assume about ninjas—black pajamas, throwing stars, swords, etc…—is utter nonsense. The traditional role that grew to be known as a “ninja” was simply that of a spy. As Matt Alt—co-author of the book Ninja Attack—explains: A 15th century ninja would ...


7

From Wikipedia, excerpt on 3D films: The first 3D feature film was Nat Deverich's 5-reel melodrama Power of Love (US '22), starring Terry O'Neil and Barbara Bedford. It premiered at the Ambassador Hotel Theater, Los Angeles, on September 27, 1922.


6

The British Carry-On films franchise consists of 31 films, all directed by Gerald Thomas, the actors and their film appearances in the series who beat the John Wayne record are Kenneth Williams (25), Joan Sims (24) and Charles Haughtry (23) .


5

There are a lot of great mockumentary style comedy shows such as The Office, Parks and Recreation, Modern Family, etc. My question is who invented this style? Who was the first to make a show or a movie that way? Early examples of mockumentaries. The general genre of what you describe is known as a “mockumenary”. An early example of this genre is ...


5

The earliest one I could think of that answers all those criteria is A Florida Enchantment from 1914. The 63 minute silent film is about a woman taking a magical seed which transforms her into a man. (It's also one of the earliest examples of a plot with gay and bisexual themes). It ends with the heroine realizing that it was all a dream. Another early ...


5

This question is likely to suffer from debates over what constitutes the original cast; whether you count factual TV, coverage of public events, etc; and what constitutes renewal as opposed to a one-off special, sequel, film spin-off, etc: many TV shows have seen one-off reunions, etc. The longest gap I know is The Jetsons which returned after 22 years in ...


5

The accent you are describing is known as the Mid-Atlantic dialect. Here are a couple articles on the matter: #1, #2, #3 I find it odd that three articles have been written on this subject matter, by the magazine The Atlantic and in couple year time span no less. But as sure as it sounds odd to us, contemporary films will sound odd to future generations.


5

As with all tropes, it's very complex to really identify when the cliché began - are we looking for the earliest horror film where a black person died first, or a film after which there was a notable trend? Spider Baby, Or The Maddest Story Ever Told from 1967 is a possible contender, where a black person dies in the very first scene. However, it's ...



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