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87

TLDR: There are plenty of films where the "bad guy" wins. Ultimately, the reason why the bad guy wins can come down to a number of reasons, including to be more realistic, to set up a later "good" ending in another film or because it's unexpected, to name a few reasons. Long Answer (note: there will be spoilers for some films below): I think there are ...


30

You asked a number of questions here; as often happens, not all of them got answered. Try to ask only one question per question. Are there actually rules, written or unwritten, preventing a script with victorious villains ever being made into a movie? Yes. Do a web search for the "Motion Picture Production Code", also known as the "Hays Code". If ...


17

For a writer, it's important to get your audience to care about your protagonist (whether they are good, bad, ugly, or neutral). If they don't care about and aren't interested in the protagonist, and their plight, then they're not going to care about your story. If you're thinking, well, I'll get the audience to care about the bad guy (etc.), then that ...


11

The first, most prominent film that springs to my mind is Star Wars : The Empire Strikes Back. ** spoiler alert ** By the end, a Rebel base has been destroyed.. our hero Luke has just had his hand cut off, Han Solo is in frozen in carbonite. Darth Vader and the Emprire definitely have the upper hand. Of course this has to be viewed in the context of ...


9

The film Swordfish (2001) has part of its plot around this particular subject. The good guys always winning, the bad guy losing; and the whole idea is for the audience to feel happy. It's also an example of where arguably the bad guy does win. He does get to head off into the sunset having done what he intended. Okay, he paints himself as a good guy, but ...


9

There is a tradition in storytelling that dictate that the bad guy "wins" in the end. This is mostly prevalent in horror/ghost stories and can be found in almost all human cultures. In most of these types of stories, the story structure is almost always a horror reveal where the story ends with the protagonist realising or confronting the real ghost/horror ...


8

First one that comes to mind is The Usual Suspects Without giving it away, the plot takes you in one direction, before an abrupt (and clever) plot twist, and the result is that the main villain (Keyser Soze) wins. We don't tend to get stories with the villan as winner, we tend to follow the heroic character and so invest feelings in them.


3

The first movie that sprang to my mind was Shane, released in 1953. The bad guys don't really win, since they're all dead, but the good guy is implied to be dying as he heads into the sunset at the end. So, per your definition, the bad guys have won. The movie was received well enough in general, but I can't find any references right off for how the ending ...


1

Depending on how you define digital (I suppose the relevant part would be the bit that catches the light, an electronic sensor instead of chemical process), then Prospero's Books released in August 1991 may be a contender. See the tech ref on imdb.com. It's directed by Peter Greenaway, starring John Gielgud.



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