Hot answers tagged

35

It's a matter of the director having a specific vision of how his Batman stories will become. In the first two films, Christopher Nolan wanted to bring Batman back to his roots, explore how Bruce Wayne became Batman, and how Batman became the legend he is (in the 1989 Batman film, when Vicki Vale asks Bruce why bats, he replies "They're great survivors"; in ...


27

Chaos and Anarchy are the greatest overarching themes of the entire trilogy. In Batman Begins, we are presented a Gotham that is seemingly serene, as we witness a young Bruce playing in his garden, blissful and happy. Until one fateful night, his parents are taken from him in a drastic event that spirals his world completely out of control, into chaos. We ...


25

Robin is in the final Nolan directed Batman movie ("The Dark Knight Rises"). In the final few minutes of the movie, when Officer Blake (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) is collecting his property from the boys home, the woman behind the desk isn't able to find his name in their system. He then gives her is 'real name,' after which she says "You should use your real ...


20

The effect of the order of sequences in the film is meant to display Leonard's inability to remember, showing what seems to be a mixed series of events out of order. It is also performed this way because it is a way for the viewer to sympathize and get involved with the story, trying to figure out what is going on as much as the main character is. It is ...


20

I see these colors/movie titles as the day in the life of a bat, beginning at sunset (orange) and ending at sunrise (white/bight) with a dark night in between (blue). Also plays on the titles; BEGINS, NIGHT and sunRISE. That is another nice conclusion to the saga.


16

I've been searching for a direct quote where Nolan addresses the reasons why this song was included in the script. All I found was this transcript from a press conference which included the following exchange: Hollywood News: The score and the sound design for this film are phenomenal; it’s almost like another character. Chris, can you talk about that a ...


14

Analyzing the past two films and Rises, Nolan (Director) and his brother Jonathan (Screenplay Writer) are trying to envision a world where they asked the question… "What if... Batman existed in our current world today as opposed to the comics." Thus the feel and directing has a less comic book-ish (if that's a word) look, and more of a real world view. ...


12

There are numerous magazine articles and interviews with Nolan in which he states that he always conceived his Batman films as a three-act story. He and his brother had the basic arc mapped out from the beginning, it was just a case of putting meat on the bones when the time came to write the next script. Quoting Nolan: Without getting into specifics, ...


11

Nolan has given an explanation for this. According to him the Batman portrayed in his movies is still young and according to comics Robin appears only when Batman grows old and hence needs a sidekick. Nolan has also said that in his trilogy Robin won't appear at all because these movies will present a young Batman.


11

I am not sure, this is just a guess: The director might have decided to use this narrative structure in order to confuse the watcher. The main character suffers from a strange type of amnesia, that is why he can't remember the past. We, as watchers, are confronted with the same problem: we see the present, but have no idea of what events lead to this. I ...


9

To keep it short: The point of the Robin reference was to display that even though the audience did not know Blake was Robin, he still was. In some interview, someone close to the production of the movie mentioned how the purpose is that he was Robin the whole time, you only find out at the end. This represents perfectly what Batman says to Blake earlier ...


9

Christian Bale said that he wouldn't want to be Batman in this franchise if there was a Robin and Christopher Nolan obliged. Nolan said that he wouldn't fit the dark tone of the movies. Also Dick Grayson is very young when he becomes Robin, about 10 or 12. So that's another reason for not having him in the films.


8

I think the movies are about "Controlling the Fate of Gotam." First movies, I CAN control the fate of Gotham, Second Movie, I CAN'T control the fate of Gotham. Third Movie, WE CAN control the fate of Gotham.


8

The whole point of Nolan's Batman is a meditation on myth and legend. He includes these things to imply, I think, that the version of batman we learnt about over the years is a myth based on some things which may or may not have happened, events passed on by word of mouth and stories. As in all myths, names change over time, get jumbled up, and the story ...


7

Not knowing much about the upcoming movie, nor anything about Bane the main adversary, I can only comment on the first two. The choice of brown evokes grime and dirt and brooding menance - a perfect analogy of the scene in Gotham, particularly with The Narrows - a slum part of the city, a no-go area for police similar to the (no-longer existing) Kowloon in ...


6

He is in The Dark Night Rises with the cover name In the final scene you hear a woman asking why he does not go by his real name, and then calls him "Robin".


6

Batman will be rebooted to fit in with the new DC Universe leading up to an eventual Justice League movie that has been green lighted after the success of Marvel's Avengers. It will not be confirmed until after the Superman reboot that's coming next year. So there was no time to introduce Robin as the Franchise had to go to make way for what they expect to ...


6

I think Nolan left it in the idea that Batman is retiring and wanted to end the saga unlike the comic book stories which run infinitely. He wanted Blake to take over the legacy from Batman and probably plays a little homage to Robin like Ducard's reference from the comics as pointed out earlier. Also using Dick Grayson would've led people to believe before ...


5

As the other excellent answers have shown the movies are rich of various overarching themes, be they political or philosophical, about a hero or his city. But on a very personal level they are about a man, in particular Bruce Wayne's struggle to cope with the tragedy he experienced as a child and to overcome the resulting grief, fear and anger that ...


5

I recently stumbled upon an article explaining the same Batman Begins had a dominatly brown color scheme to paint Gotham City as the crime infested wasteland shithole that it was. The Dark Knight's color scheme was mostly blue,which was done to create a contrast...at first it is used to create a vibe of calm relaxation in showing that Batman has ...


3

I took the mention of his first name being Robin as a sly joke. He is an amalgamation of all the sidekicks Batman has had and was essentially the Robin character in spirit. The problem was that the dynamic between batman and robin had become so campy and ridiculous in the film representations they needed to approach it in a fresh way and not have him deck ...


3

Yes, the ending of Inception is open to viewer's interpretation. Check this interview by Chris Nolan. About the open ending Nolan says that I've always believed that if you make a film with ambiguity, it needs to be based on a true interpretation. If it's not, then it will contradict itself, or it will be somehow insubstantial and end up making the ...


2

The message is straight forward and twofold: No matter how bad things are, a single person or single idea can make a difference. This contrasts with most heroes (e.g. Superman) which follows a basic religious story (omnipotent being arrives and looks over lowly mankind, protecting us from ourselves). In Batman the symbol is the thing, and it is bigger ...


2

Because: One of the worst things that can happen to a movie franchise, especially a really good one, is over-milking. Some directors in Hollywood care about story, not just money (shocking, I know). Nolan is one of those directors. Nolan had a complete storyline for it and had a set ending. Fun fact: Nolan actually had wanted to end it after Begins and ...


2

Because some non-comic readers aren't familiar with Dick's name, and Nolan didn't have the sense to reveal his real name as Grayson and throw in a line about him being a Boy Wonder (which would have clued in the audience AND satisfied the fans).



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