Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

28

This will be achieved through a series of shots. Let's pretend you want to show a scene where two people are talking in a diner - here is the classic way to go about it. First you shoot an establishing shot of the whole room - your actors can perform the whole scene and it doesn't matter if they mess up, as you will not be using the dialogue from this shot ...


18

It's called Dolly Zoom (but there are a couple of alternate names for it) From MediaCollege: A dolly zoom is a cinematic technique in which the camera moves closer or further from the subject while simultaneously adjusting the zoom angle to keep the subject the same size in the frame. The effect is that the subject appears stationary while the ...


11

Beginning in the late 1980s, Sony began marketing the concept of "electronic cinematography," utilizing its analog Sony HDVS professional video cameras. The effort met with very little success. In 1998, with the introduction of HDCAM recorders and 1920 × 1080 pixel digital professional video cameras based on CCD technology, the idea, now re-branded as ...


9

This type of shot is most commonly known as a Deep Focus Shot. From the wiki page: Deep focus is a photographic and cinematographic technique using a large depth of field. Depth of field is the front-to-back range of focus in an image — that is, how much of it appears sharp and clear. Consequently, in deep focus the foreground, middle-ground and background ...


7

This has to do with communicating to the viewer what the intended subject is, when the subject may be ambiguous among other things. A hunter is searching for his prey. A red bird sitting in an apple tree. He pans past several apples, then the bird and then returns to the bird. It's now clear that the red bird is not a red apple. While some viewers may ...


5

In addition to Mathew's answer, it might also be to emphasize that the searching person is indeed, well, searching and doesn't initially know where to look exactly. Directly moving its view to the target might on the other hand seem like he knew where to look all the time. So introducing this slight delay of recognition emphasizes the searching process. And ...


5

I don't know for sure, but I highly suspect those were created in a studio. There are 2 main reasons: The lighting is consistent. In the real world, the sun moves across the sky and shadows follow it. Clouds make intermittent shadows. The intensity of light changes at different times of day - dawn, noon, sunset, night. (I suppose that the filmmakers ...


4

I don't think you can say that a color filter can be used to evoke a particular psychological effect in the viewer as a rule because the filter is always working in conjunction with environmental conditions (including artificial lighting). A yellow filter in one condition creates one effect and in another condition it does something else. More likely, a ...


3

It is possible. According to this article, Alexander Sokurov's Faust (2011) was filmed entirely through a "color filter that lends it a faded tone, tending towards blues and greys and very, very stark whites." The film won the Golden Lion Award at the Venice Film Festival. The film may have been changed further through CGI, but this example answers the first ...


3

Slow motion video is recorded in a rate higher than the playback rate (Ben already explained the details). When taking a still image (but it corresponds to video) there are 3 parameters: exposure time lens aperture sensor/film sensitivity Modifying these 3 will result in certain effects: motion or shake blur vs more "frozen" action more vs less depth ...


3

As per the Trivia page for "Frenzy" on IMDB: Midway through the film, there is a famous continuous shot in which the camera backs away from the door of Rusk's upper-floor apartment and descends the staircase, seemingly without a cut, to the ground level, out the building's front door, and then to the opposite side of the street. The interiors were shot ...


2

Defintitely not. Infact it changes from movie to movie,series to series and infact from scene to scene in some movies. Game of Thrones for example definitely uses cameras that are on par with the best movie camera's but the flash is much lower quality. One of the biggest changes you'll notice is in some movies with indoors and outdoor scenes. In Chronicles ...


2

My first reaction was it was done with Steadicam, except Frenzy came out in 1972 and Steadicam was first used in 1976. I found a good description of how the shot was done here: "Deconstructing the Tracking Shot". A camera jib was used for the interior shot, and a dolly ws used for the exterior. There is actually an edit in the shot, hidden by the man ...


2

This video explains the techniques used to create the time-lapse sequences of the BBC Life (2009) series. I'm not sure if the team was the same for the Planet Earth (2006) series, but imagine that the techniques shown (with refinements and technological updates) would be similar. The (massively oversimplified) approach appears to be:- identify a suitable ...


2

slow motion happens by filming at a higher frames per second (FPS) than the playback on a projector happens. What you're talking about is a high speed camera, designed to capture more FPS than a standard camera. If a high speed camera records at 240 FPS and play back runs at 24 FPS, then what took 1 second to record will talk 10 seconds to watch, and be very ...


2

In addition to Matthew's and Christian's answers, I would add that this is a specific form of the old "double take" trope; in this case the second take is being shown through the observer's eyes, as opposed to it being shown from an external POV.


1

There used to be much more difference between TV and Film camera usage than there is now... and it also varies depending on the type of show you're talking about... I'm going to assume you mean feature films and narrative TV shows. Cameras used for TV shows and films now vary widely depending on the preference of the director/dp of the show. Many tv shows ...


1

Very rarely indeed but it does happen. It's basically a budget thing, in general movie cameras are rented due to their cost (even with new digital ones such as Red's models) whereas any TV show filmed in a studio are generally owned by the production facility. That said I know for a fact that the large studio-based cameras inside BBC studios are ...


1

The 1958 film South Pacific made extensive use of colored filters and the result was so irritating that it probably scared other filmmakers away from the technique for decades. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Pacific_(film) The article is ambiguous but I believe the filters were applied in post-production.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible