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26

After looking into TyrionLannister's answer, I found this on wikipedia: Bugs Bunny's nonchalant carrot-chewing standing position, as explained by Chuck Jones, Friz Freleng, and Bob Clampett, originated in a scene in the film It Happened One Night, in which Clark Gable's character leans against a fence, eating carrots rapidly and talking with his mouth ...


23

It may be that you have fallen for the classic effect called the Uncanny Valley. The reason those humans seem creepy to you is that they indeed look pretty much like real humans and not like exaggerated caricatures of humans usually seen in other animated movies. This first sounds rather paradox, but when looking at arbitrary animated creatures (like toys, ...


18

According to this article from Creative Planet Network "We have the technology, and our animators have the skills to do 3-D," says supervising producer Anne Garefino. "We don't want it to look computery,"agrees director of animation Eric Stough, who's been on board since the pilot. "We want it to look as crappy as possible."


17

Performance capture generally refers to the practice of capturing very subtle movements from real actors and using those in animation. Movies like Ice Age are fine without performance capture because the characters aren't realistic. The problem you run into when trying to make realistic human animations is that the human brain is wired to detect very ...


16

Would it be Bobobo-bo Bo-bobo? Bobobo-bo Bo-bobo (ボボボーボ・ボーボボ Bobobōbo Bōbobo?), or "Bobobo" as he is often called, is the main protagonist and title character. Bobobo is an eccentric man with bodybuilder sized muscles and a giant yellow afro. He fights the forces of evil using his nose hair calling it his "Fist of the Nose Hair" and "Snot Fo-You" ...


16

Buy a coconut in the supermarket. What's the color? The "nut" is most likely brown and hairy. Sure, it's not like they appear when still on the trees, but who knows? IMO it's all about being recognizable (and also knowledge) to some extent. In a similar way, if you see Bananas in a cartoon, they're yellow. Tomatoes are red, apples are typically red, etc. ...


15

The (co-)Creator of Bugs Bunny, Tex Avery, once said: We decided he was going to be a smart-aleck rabbit, but casual about it, and his opening line in the very first one was Eh, what's up, Doc? And, gee, it floored [the audience]! They expected the rabbit to scream, or anything but make a casual remark--here's a guy with a gun in his face! It got ...


14

They do use 3D animation software. However, from the beginning the cut-out paper look is what they wanted to achieve with CG after finding out the difficulties of using real paper cut-outs. The decision to stay with the paper cut-out look was made from the beginning, they want everything to look as cartoonish as possible, down to the movements and ...


12

To represent Animal perspective. The Tom and Jerry cartoon is about animals, they have to show their perspective. Humans are larger to them, they can't even see their full body together. So it's kept that way. Humans are not even a regular cast, so why to bother to make their faces when it isn't needed. It also helps to make the audience focus on Tom and ...


10

I believe what you are looking for is The Pagemaster It has a boy that gets stuck in a library that then gets sucked into an animated world. The beginning of the movie starts out a bit like so, before going animated, From wikipedia Richard slips on some water that had dripped from his coat and falls down, hitting his head and knocking him ...


10

From the South Park Studios interview with Matt Stone (where users were encouraged to ask questions): j0l0n: from Henbob -> What made you think of the canadians having those funny head and everything is square? its brilliant! cheers MattStone: Well the idea came to us during a trip to Toronto. That's just the way they all look up there... In a ...


9

Coconuts brown as they mature, so it's not always an inaccurate depiction. Cartoons rely on a certain visual "shorthand" for many things that fly in the face of common knowledge, but are subconsciously accepted as part of the cartoon world or the larger entertainment or cultural zeitgeist. Most of us are aware that cars can't possibly operate like they do ...


8

The Mouse and His Child is the one you're thinking of, I believe. I found it on YouTube. It ran on HBO in the early eighties I think. I watched it several times as a kid. I loved it but at the same time found it to be a little disturbing.


8

Animated films are just another form of storytelling, and I wouldn't say that executives or writers or anyone looks at a script that's been written and decides if they want to do it via live action with live actors, or animation of some kind. I believe that sort of thing is decided well in advance. However, animation can allow for certain things that live ...


8

To be honest I don't think there is any real issue here regarding similar films from the two animation stables and disagree with anyone who thinks there are more than two comparable sets of films in the original question. Firstly, we can eliminate two of your examples, as Dreamworks were not involved (The Wild, Robots), so perhaps the question could be made ...


8

Could it by any chance be Johnny Bravo? The name doesn't really match with what you think it is, and I have no idea what his profession is, but the visual description seems to be spot on.


8

I know, I thought so too when I first saw Jake. But it turns out his eyes are not inverted. The sclera of his eye (aka "the white of the eye") isn't shown. The whole eye is drawn black, as can be seen on dogs whose eyes are not turned at extreme angle and the white circle we see is reflected light, like on this random stock photo of a dog (not the same model ...


7

Treehouse TV refers to both characters as 'he'. Toopy is a mouse with a vivid imagination. He transforms reality into a series of fantastic stories brimming with amazing creatures. Binoo, the tiny cat, is Toopy’s ideal companion. He shares in the adventures with absolute wonder and untainted innocence, often outdoing Toopy in imagination.


7

Mixing of real characters with animated characters is done in several ways (wiki link)- double-printing two negatives onto the same release print. More sophisticated techniques used optical printers or aerial image animation cameras, which enabled more exact positioning, and better interaction of actors and animated characters. Example- In the penguin ...


7

In the episode "Worlds without end", the Joes travel to a parallel universe where G.I.Joe was eradicated and Cobra won. They even run into the skeletons of a few dead Joes. But no one was killed on screen.


7

I'm pretty sure you're talking about Volere Volare (1991), an italian movie where the main character has a date with a girl, but he's so nervous that he transformes into an animated character.


7

Those Films Make Money Tangled earned $559 million word wide from box office sales, not including merchandising profits. It cost $260 million to make. So doubling your investment isn't bad. Red Riding Hood (2011) was a live action story based upon a fairy tale. It cost much less $42 million, but only did $89 million. That would be counted as a success, ...


7

According to Wikipedia, the Donkey has appeared in these movies/TV episodes (apart from the 4 main Shrek movies): Shrek The Halls. Scared Shrekless. On an episode of Father of the Pride. Also, on a musical, but it wasn't animation. I think Shrek wasn't on Father of the Pride. Could it be the one you're talking about?


6

I think performance capture is used to make animation that is more naturalistic through capturing movement from actors. This has been used with great effect where animation has to interact with live action - such as Gollum in the LoTR movies or King Kong (both using Andy Serkis as the actor), where a 'simply' animated character can be unconvincing. In this ...


6

In the episode, When Calls Galactus, Terrax attacks Earth (Manhattan). Galactus isn't terribly pleased to learn that his herald has defected, so he comes back to Earth to do away with Terrax. One problem, Galactus needs to feed, and the only planet in the vicinity is Earth! Since Galactus no longer has a herald to search out planets for him, he attempts ...


6

I'm pretty sure this is The Water Babies. When a 12-year-old chimney sweep is wrongfully blamed for being a thief, he makes a run for it, he jumps into a violent river. There he encounters a civilization of anthropomorphic underwater creatures. Before he can return to the surface and clear his name, however, he must help rescue his new friends, the Water ...


6

The show's style of animation is inspired by the paper cut-out cartoons made by Terry Gilliam for Monty Python's Flying Circus , of which Parker and Stone have been lifelong fans. After the pilot for subsequent episodes have been produced by computer animation, providing a similar look to the originals while requiring a fraction of the time to ...


5

The first time Bugs uses the phrase is in the cartoon Wild Hare 1940. The rabbit walks up to Elmer Fudd who is hunting for him with a large gun and casually asks, “What’s up Doc?” Its their original phrase. May be inspired from What's up Phrase Which appears previously The phrase appears in Jack London's The Sea Wolf (1904), chapter 25 (-- ...


5

Cossacs. Looks like story about Cossacs. Russian wiki link It's Soviet cartoon and there are a number of episodes, actually.


5

Is it Visionaries: Knights of the Magical Light? Link leads to a youtube video of the first episode.



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