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Whenever one encounters great art - whether written, filmed, painted, or other - it should be kept in mind that very little of it is accidental. Without going into the merits of the Peabody Award winning series, would you think Dickens, for example, or Shakespeare, or Walt Whitman wrote works with entirely unintentional outcomes? Vince Gilligan has often ...


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Jesse is reborn. Walt face his life to let Jesse go and intentionally take the blame. I'm sure Walt didn't go in there thinking he would survive (tying up all loose ends before hand and what not). Besides, the way the show is made, very linear and cut and dry (not in a bad way), if Jesse went to jail, the would've made that very clear.


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I always believed it to symbolise the innocence Walter had destroyed staring back at him. If you'll realize, every time he sees it, or it sees him, he is in a pathetic state, ignorant, or just guilty.


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The writers left if open ended with a nod to the audience that he got away free. 'Breaking Bad': Creator Vince Gilligan explains series finale: On the decision to spare Jesse and allow him to escape “We found over the years that the way we can please the majority of the audience most of the time is to tune out as much extraneous factors as possible ...


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This might well be implying the payback. In many cases Breaking Bad producers show things that have not yet happened. That being said, the next thing is the two enforcers get ran over by Walter.


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It's actually a horrifying ending. The ending is supposed to be completely saccharine. I watched this with my Dad who was a retired LCDC counselor and he explained it. By complete Deus Ex Machina Nick Cage's character gets his life back together, he has a chance to go clean, have a family and a promotion and straighten up. And he does, but he also doesn't. ...


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"He relies on luck", might not be the right choice of words here. I would like to put as "He takes huge risks and he is not afraid of taking on these insanely difficult tasks" In other words, he attempts things, which seem impossible. Hence the name Mission Impossible. In MI 2, we have the rock climbing scene, where he slips and almost falls, but he ...


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If you watch the end closely you will notice that both the Schindler Jews and their actor counterparts place stones on the grave. We only see Liam Neeson's forearm and hand as he places the two red roses. I believe Neeson uses roses to show his respect instead of a stone and he knows his portrayal is as temporary as the flowers. Red was used as a connection ...


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Note the expression 'getting rid of baggage' is usually referring to emotional baggage. The brother's actual journey is accompanied by a kind of 'spiritual journey' as they confront their pasts, analyze their current life & make plans for the future. After this actual & emotional journey, the linked Wikipedia article states: At the station, ...


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Ma-Ma is seen playing with a sculpture during the scene where Techie initiates war protocol, shutting down the block. It can be assumed she takes them from him because she likes them. In fact, in the final scene where Ma-Ma is confronted there are in fact 2 wire sculptures. One on the floor by Anderson and the other on her bed. The sculpture is symbolic of ...


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As others have stated, Sam Gold is ego personified; Avi states this in the film. The "Sam Gold" that the gangsters refer to is a ghost story created by Zack and Avi, a fiction to intimidate and threaten the gangsters' egos. Zack & Avi hired Lily Walker so that they could interface with the criminal underworld (& manipulate Macha) while remaining ...


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In watching the movie I found that the 1st Story had 2 lighting strike events in it. That would make the telling of 6 stories have 7 strikes because if the 1st story had 2 strike and the other stories only had one then that means there would have been 5 lightning strikes left out of six stories so we actually did see 7 lightning strikes it was simply spanned ...


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It shows the harsh reality of the post war condition of Italy and the reality of life begins with battling and one must catch out his problems alone.


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Hanna was probably guilty but you would have to question her overall intelligence. In the film she had no understanding of right or wrong. First of all having an affair with a kid.she saw nothing wrong with this and also in court she saw nothing wrong with condemning 300 people to death. I think she was a pawn and was took advantage of due to her lack of ...


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It always seemed to me that Tom (Gabriel Byrne) says 'hat' in a way that sounds a lot like 'heart.' "Nothing more foolish than a man chasing his heart" is a reasonable synopsis of the movie. Leo (Albert Finney's character) chases his heart trying to win Verna, and nearly loses everything for it. Tom spends the movie chasing his heart as well. He may be ...


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It's comical usage of the name PK, which is a common name as Pankaj Kumar or Prashant Khare and so on, also means drunk. When he asks questions to people which seem absurd to a common man, they ask if he is drunk (bhai pi ke he ka). And continuosly being asked the same Amir Khan eventually starts believing that maybe he is known as PK on earth, somehow earth ...


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He met the queen in 1989 while the two were still living together so that is why she went. Not sure why the movie made it seem otherwise because they didn't separate until a year after and didn't divorce until 1995. It's unclear whether Jane cheated physically but clearly did love Jonathan as she is currently married to him. It did appeared Stephen also ...


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I believe he buried that ring when he learned that his ancestor fought on the losing side. He buried that ring because he was dissappointed, because he thought he is the descendant of winners, not losers. He buried it because he didn't want to be a loser, but to win the trials that awaits him. When he received the new ring, it didn't symbolize the loser, ...


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When he says that, he doesn't really speak of some actual supernatural incarnation of the antichrist, but of the antichrist that could be said to symbolically stand behind every factual and concrete evil action of humanity. What he actually says is that the ignorance and evil of men has won yet again. It is a bit of a wordplay supposing the concrete meaning ...


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I think it's more than McCall researching Teddy. It's McCall basically saying, I know you, I know where you come from because I've been there myself. This scene is vitally important because it shows that Teddy/Nicolai is not a comic book character but someone whose history has brought him there. And most important, McCall knows Teddy because he probably had ...


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V for Victory was a popular symbol im the UK from WW2 onwards. It is a V shape with the index and middle finger, palm facing inwards. Originally it was ment to symbolize the success of the empire in hard times, but it eventually became a vulgar gesture for social dissent and rebelion. I always saw it as being part of what the V stood for. If anything this ...


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Body counts only matter for public relations, psychiatric treatment, or Hollywood. A SEAL goes to great effort to win his SEAL badge, remember the Movie? Twice individual SEALs are shown placing their personal badge of exceptional achievement on the coffin of a SEAL at the graveside. How could this be anything but a very personal statement of deep respect by ...


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As I wrote in the comments my understanding always was that it was Jacob, who brought DHARMA to the island and this is how they fit the universe. In the end they were not different from the 'Oceanic 816' survivors or the Spanish ship crew. They were people that Jacob wanted on The Island. Whether it was him behind DHARMA creation or he just used an existing ...



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