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I think too, that the water symbolizes purity..(clean & pure) which to me reenforces the wrongful act of the affair. Also somehow, during other scenes such as the scene where she is washing dishes, the water symbolizes sensuality.


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The lead character and s called Camiel. That is the name of one of the Archangels. His surname is Borgman, which means something akin to landlord or toll taker.


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It's about finding joy and happiness in times of sorrow as evidenced by the parents being happy about the scholarship and the white tulips in the dark room. There's always light.


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The character of English Bob is set to contrast with William Mummy. Mummy is a real killer, English Bob a self proclaimed killer. The reporter hears the story of English Bob and after that, he sees him be humiliated by Little Bill, what makes him a liar, at least a great story teller. In the last scene, he sees in Mummy what English Bob supposed to be. ...


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my guess is that Cage usually wakes up to the last moment where he regained consciousness. Since he lost consciousness when he was tasered, that's where he wakes up. Now, when Omega is killed, the war is over, so Cage would never have met with the General, and therefore never would have been tasered and lose consciousness. In this situation, the last ...


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Eye of god, the oracle, yes. More simply it represents and eye for an eye, and even more specifically a symbol for karma or cause and effect in the plot structure.


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I'm going to say, Possibly. Maybe not intentionally, but I think at that period in Bill Murray's career, when he was at the top of his game, most of his characters exhibited the same type of personality. His acting really was pretty one-dimensional, almost like Keanu Reeves. Murray was the lovable loser with the big ego, always ready with a funny quip. ...


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The ring probably symbolizes a simpler time for Frank. As we saw in his class reunion episode (Season 1 Episode 8), Frank was quite different and more idealistic back in school. He sang in a barbershop quartet, was in a loving relationship, and basically ran wild and rambunctious with his schoolmates. The fact that for the duration of his stay in his school ...


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.... Those are the bottons of the coat he just ripped off...


1

Ronan is the military commandar of the Kree's sectarian arm. The Kree, as a species, are made up of separate and autonomous divisions that function without accountability to each other. This is a deliberate and seemingly harmonious relationship, as the right hand cannot be held accountable for the actions of the left. The Kree's political/diplomatic wing ...


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I am almost positive your question isn't... accurate. I believe you're combining the 2 statues that were on Hank's desk. Originally, he was given a statue of Jesús Malverde, as noted in the answer above. No need to go further on that. After Hank showed ignorance of Jesús Malverde, one of his colleagues exchanges statues with Hank, and he is given a ...


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During the mid-1800's through early I mid-1900's Japanese created a lot of words based on German. They both had a mutual respect often referring to Japan as "honorary Aryan's" and the purest racial elite of Asians. You can search for words in Japanese derived from German/English words. Also remember English is a Germanic language so similarities will be ...


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Aside from He didn't know about it (as explained in MattD's answer) there might be another possible explanation: The Aether wasn't in that museum. To quote director/writer James Gunn: "I will say that is probably not the Collector’s only museum. I think he probably has other spaces in which he keeps his incredibly vast selection. That’s just ...


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Haven't seen or heard this anywhere but I've always speculated the purple was a visual metaphor for blood and the meth. Blood (red) and meth (blue) are two main themes in the show, blue + red = purple but maybe I'm adding more brilliance then was intended


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I'll try to answer these as best I can. 1. Why is Thanos only interested in the Orb? As far as we can tell, this is the only Infinity Stone that Thanos is truly aware of. Even the Guardians of the Galaxy don't become aware of what's in the orb until The Collector opens it and reveals it to them. Thanos is using Ronan and his adopted daughters to retrieve ...


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The existing answers here have already provided some very good insights into the particular advantages of the comic medium due to its different structural form of storytelling, which I guess to a large degree come down to the comic's discrete presentation and the customizable pacing of its consuption. In addition to that I would like to approach this from ...


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Building on the answers that it's not expressionism, I think I've found what it is. This last week the local improv troupe (BATS) brought in some guest artists from Germany to examine Bertold Brecht's ideas of Epic Theatre and see how it could apply to long-form improv, and their Q&A after the show and some subsequent research brought me here. Epic ...


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I agree with Dan. The scene is thematic in nature. But I would go further to say it is a summary of the theme of the story. It is about a man (Mike) who lies about his wife (like Jerry lies about the whereabouts of his own wife), lies about his income, (Mike pretending he's an engineer at Honeywell, Jerry is lying about his income on the loan he's ...


3

This is a great question and timely as I just acquired Zack Snyder's attempt at adapting these books to film. As mentioned in another response the symmetrical panel layout with a larger center panel is something that can only be appreciated when reading the source material vs film. I thought it would be nice to have an example below. Another similar ...


10

There is a famous term Out of the furnace and into the fire This idiom means: from a bad situation into one that is worse, which again is very apt for this film. In some countries it is changed to from out of the frying pan into the fire but both have the same meaning. Just to show that this is a used phrase this link shows it in general use ...


1

One example for the unique (and new) quality of the comic is issue #5 of Watchmen: The whole of the issue's layout was intended to be symmetrical, culminating in this center spread, where the pages reflect one another. I seriously doubt that the movie (which I continue to ignore) even tried to achieve this - and even if it did somehow, the comic allows you ...


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You weren't the only one wondering that; the ending perplexed many. But the film's director Scott Cooper explained it in interviews, like this one. Here's the gist: After being thwarted by law enforcement officials, Russell kills Harlan DeGroat (Woody Harrelson), the meth-addicted crime boss responsible for murdering his brother, right in front of the ...


1

From the film's Wiki page: The Carrie Furnace, an abandoned blast furnace near Braddock, served as the location for the film's finale. Christian Bale wore a tattoo of Braddock's ZIP code, 15104, on his neck as an homage to the town's mayor John Fetterman, who has the same design on his arm.


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OK here's my stab at this question. There are a lot of differences between the book and the movie, and if I was to use a term to collectively describe these differences I would say narration density. Watchmen is a rather dense book that effectively uses it's panels to tell several tangential stories. That's very hard for the film medium to achieve. Let's ...


5

Very short answer: It tried harder to be different and more "grown-up. (I'm sure we'll get some thesis-level answer, but this is a few bullet-points just to get the ball rolling.) The cover is page one, panel one. That was new. And they played more with transitions between panels and pages, using composition and dialogue / sound to blend the elements into a ...



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