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The existing answers here have already provided some very good insights into the particular advantages of the comic medium due to its different structural form of storytelling, which I guess to a large degree come down to the comic's discrete presentation and the customizable pacing of its consuption. In addition to that I would like to approach this from ...


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Building on the answers that it's not expressionism, I think I've found what it is. This last week the local improv troupe (BATS) brought in some guest artists from Germany to examine Bertold Brecht's ideas of Epic Theatre and see how it could apply to long-form improv, and their Q&A after the show and some subsequent research brought me here. Epic ...


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I agree with Dan. The scene is thematic in nature. But I would go further to say it is a summary of the theme of the story. It is about a man (Mike) who lies about his wife (like Jerry lies about the whereabouts of his own wife), lies about his income, (Mike pretending he's an engineer at Honeywell, Jerry is lying about his income on the loan he's ...


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This is a great question and timely as I just acquired Zack Snyder's attempt at adapting these books to film. As mentioned in another response the symmetrical panel layout with a larger center panel is something that can only be appreciated when reading the source material vs film. I thought it would be nice to have an example below. Another similar ...


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There is a famous term Out of the furnace and into the fire This idiom means: from a bad situation into one that is worse, which again is very apt for this film. In some countries it is changed to from out of the frying pan into the fire but both have the same meaning. Just to show that this is a used phrase this link shows it in general use ...


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One example for the unique (and new) quality of the comic is issue #5 of Watchmen: The whole of the issue's layout was intended to be symmetrical, culminating in this center spread, where the pages reflect one another. I seriously doubt that the movie (which I continue to ignore) even tried to achieve this - and even if it did somehow, the comic allows you ...


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You weren't the only one wondering that; the ending perplexed many. But the film's director Scott Cooper explained it in interviews, like this one. Here's the gist: After being thwarted by law enforcement officials, Russell kills Harlan DeGroat (Woody Harrelson), the meth-addicted crime boss responsible for murdering his brother, right in front of the ...


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From the film's Wiki page: The Carrie Furnace, an abandoned blast furnace near Braddock, served as the location for the film's finale. Christian Bale wore a tattoo of Braddock's ZIP code, 15104, on his neck as an homage to the town's mayor John Fetterman, who has the same design on his arm.


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OK here's my stab at this question. There are a lot of differences between the book and the movie, and if I was to use a term to collectively describe these differences I would say narration density. Watchmen is a rather dense book that effectively uses it's panels to tell several tangential stories. That's very hard for the film medium to achieve. Let's ...


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Very short answer: It tried harder to be different and more "grown-up. (I'm sure we'll get some thesis-level answer, but this is a few bullet-points just to get the ball rolling.) The cover is page one, panel one. That was new. And they played more with transitions between panels and pages, using composition and dialogue / sound to blend the elements into a ...


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In Expressionism, the medium itself is expressive. An expressionist painting shows emotion in the quality of its brushstrokes, in the amount of paint used, in the colors, in the size, in the texture. Expressionism is generally not realistic in its imagery. It seeks to create a visceral response in its presentation. Expressionistic photography or ...


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No, not even remotely. Art style names like "Expressionism" are never to be taken literally they always mean something, usually the exact opposite the words original meaning. They also have a different meaning in any media, with very few common traits. Expressionism is one kind of opposite of realistic painting (that has nothing to do with realism), where ...


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"forgiveness is a running theme under all the major characters" I agree. Women refuse to forgive the innocent cowboy even after he showed sincere remorse, perhaps because what they knew they already did (hire assassins). Most importantly, Munny never forgave himself over what he had done in the past, felt sure he was going to hell. And he certainly will ...


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Probably color psychology related based off of the characters personalities. Red being chaotic, blue being "good", light-blue is probably more based off of feminism then personality type, yellow being brash, as for purple it means wealthy or aristocratic, which fits for the Yotsuba Group. See http://www.infoplease.com/spot/colors1.html


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Although, it is highly unclear who's portrait it is, it resembles to one of Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn's (a Dutch painter and etcher from the 17th century) self portraits. It can also be a rework by someone based on Rembrandt's portraits, but that is unclear as well. By the image it looks like it "could" be a self portrait of Rembrandt as he perceived ...


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This is going to be subjective at best, because (as you've pointed out) any movie can be interpreted any number of ways in order to facilitate a certain goal. Fahrenheit 9-11 features an interview with a serving US Soldier who states that, in homage to the film, their tank division plays loud music at the enemy as a way of intimidating them. The song he ...


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lets go through one by one Shephard - The main character in mass effect is not named after firefly but instead named after Alan Shepard who was an American naval officer and aviator, test pilot, flag officer, one of the original NASA Mercury Seven astronauts, and businessman, who in 1961 became the second person and the first American to travel into space. ...


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If you just look at the movie -- ignoring or forgetting that it was based on a novel -- then there is a very clear theme that ties between all the stories and characters, and it is presented quite eloquently in one of the final scenes by Jim Sturgess as Adam Ewing, when he stands in front of his monstrous father and is attacked with a series of rhetorical ...


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The 2012 movie is based on the 2004 novel by David Mitchell. So I am trying to interpret the whole story from the book's point. perhaps if somebody asked, what is the theme of the movie or the book, it would fall in same context as your question. Book's author has said the following about the book Literally all of the main characters, except one, are ...


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Yes, he liked all of the food in "Momma Cherrie's Soul Food Shack" way back then in Britain, for example. He even praised it for being so tender. There was also an episode of the US ...


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This is the most truthful thing he's said to his wife in very long time. Altruistic acts are self-interested and there is no such thing as true altruism. Animals continually decide what best action to take to serve there own purposes. Failing to pass on his empire and as a father is unacceptable to Walter because he believes it one of his purposes. To ...


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Kitchen Nightmares was based on a show in the UK called Ramsay's Kitchen Nightmares. This piece is taken verbatim from the Wiki page, which is backed by other sources: Critics have commented that Fox's adaptation of Kitchen Nightmares strayed from the strengths of the original Channel 4 series. Maureen Ryan of the Chicago Tribune said, "Leave it to ...


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The scene between Sherlock and John, where Sherlock is having an emotional break down in "Hounds of Baskerville", is similar to a scene in an episode of Star Trek called "Naked Time" where Spock has an emotional break down and confesses to feeling shame when he feels friendship towards Jim Kirk, his captain and best friend. In "Baskerville", Sherlock angrily ...


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I don't think the Mike Yanagita subplot advances the plot at all. Some of the things said above don't add up. What brings Marge back to the car dealership isn't renewed suspicion of Jerry, but the fact that records showed that the perpetrators called Shep Proudfoot, who works there. When she goes back to Jerry, she seems as credulous as ever, but she does ...


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While watching the movie, especially during the parking lot scene, the shot gets switched from POV (which is unusual since most of the movie is shot in POV), I convinced myself that the shot is switched from the POV 'cause the victim (a lady) is out of sight from Frank and director wanted the audience to show where the victim is and how she's terrified of ...


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TLDR: First sign of "darkness": Season 2, Episode 6. In it for himself: Sometime in Season 5. Full Answer: In my own opinion, the first glimpse I had of Walt's true nature was way back in Episode 6 of Season 2 - Peekaboo. In this episode, Gretchen Schwartz visits the White household and is thanked by Skyler for giving the money to Walt for his cancer ...


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I think it is pretty definitive by the time of Buyout (S. 5 Ep. 6). From the sub-titles: Walter: Jesse, you asked me if I was in the meth business or the money business. Neither. I'm in the empire business.



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