Hot answers tagged

55

It isn't just in The Force Awakens that this is the case. The original trilogy drips with it: Colours of Red, white and black throughout the empire (the main colours of Fascism are Red, Black, White and Brown) The imperial symbol whose usage can be seen as akin to that of the swastika The Empire's troops being called Stormtroopers (the name given to ...


39

Edited due to many comments providing advice: Deus Ex Machina doesn't originate from the (rather spectacular) video game Deus Ex. Modern meaning Nowadays, it's a simple phrase that exists in the English language and is defined as such: a character or thing that suddenly enters the story in a novel, play, movie, etc., and solves a problem that had ...


20

Alex Garland spoke to this in an interview with TheFilmStage. The title quite literally means "The Machine" since ... er... that's what it's about, a machine. TFS: I’ve read quite a few interviews with you about this film but I’ve yet to really see anyone ask you about the title itself. Ex Machina. Taken from Deus Ex Machina, so all it means is The ...


9

tl;dr: The movie doesn't appear to be an intentional rejection of the US jury system, merely set within the bounds of that system. The behavior of the jury members in the movie is also not indicative of how real juries are instructed to behave, though they are given pretty broad leeway (within limits) to make decisions how they see fit. I don't think ...


9

The relationship between Ex Machina and Deus Ex is that both are based on the same original phrase: Deus ex machina. The phrase had a specific meaning related to plays, however both the artworks in question are using its literal translation: God from the machine. Deus Ex, the video game series, has protagonists who undergo progressive cyborg augmentation. ...


9

Ad people know how to push our buttons. Psychological analysis on the impact of color shows that people (i.e. consumers) associate blue with concepts such as credibility, being business-like, professionalism, and trust. IBM was proud to be called "Big Blue." Facebook isn't blue by chance. Blue is also associated with honesty. All of these are good ...


8

Deus ex machina is a very old theatrical plot device, where the characters of gods would be brought on stage to develop the plot. It came to mean any 'outside influence' on the plot structure, which could not have been performed by the characters themselves. Its literal meaning "God from the machine" has been reinterpreted over recent years, as the plot ...


7

I think the point is "we're supposed to be uncomfortable". The very fact that the origins of the word stormtrooper come from German (Sturmabteilung) but came into common use in WWII as some of the most brutal of the Nazi regime soldiers ought to be a clue, plus the cut of the uniforms all the way from the beginning were very similar to the SS cut. The ...


4

Because Snoopy isn't really flying. It's all in his head. As evident by him falling from cloud 9, as it were:


4

One of the running themes of the show Lost was embodied in the struggle between Jack and Locke... the whole "Man of Science, Man of Faith" struggle. Locke was a believer in the unexplained and that by following signs of faith, good things would come. Jack on the other hand was a skeptic and always demanded for a reason or an explanation behind everything, ...


4

The M.E.: "Stomach contents include soybeans; vegetables; whole grains. A health conscious hooker." Olivia: "How 90's." Saying that a health conscious hooker is so 90's in the 1990's would be like saying, "How millennial." in 2010. I'm not sure what it is now. The year isn't important; it's just a saying. Every decade has had its health kicks; ...


4

Thirty years later (another generation has passed) and your references to hokey, ancient religions or political schemes must be more anvilicious to be recognizable to princesses, scoundrels, and farmboys. (I was born a little too late to directly experience the fear that "the Russkies" were going to "nuke us all". I certainly received a large dose of it as ...


3

In 'Columbo goes to the Guillotine' our eponymous hero specifically states that he's not psychic. "I just wish I was psychic because this thing has still got me puzzled." and "If I knew what a suspect was thinking, I would make one terrific detective" So there you go. Straight from the horse's mouth, as it were. Unless he's lying, of course...


3

Although I know you've consulted your previous question and the answer provided there, I'm going to refer to that answer to (try) and answer this one. In the Season 3 episode Fly, Walter states: "This fly is a major problem for us: It will ruin our batch, and we need to destroy it and every trace of it so we can cook. Failing that, we're dead. ...


3

Ex machina is a Latin phrase which can be translated as "from the machine" or "by reason of the machine". If one starts from the second translation then "deus ex machina" can be taken to mean "god by reason of the machine".


3

Hmmm. Well, at the end of the movie it shows her in a city, as if to become part of society. It would be assumed that she will try to pass herself off as human. "Ex" means "used to be", or "formerly", as in ex-wife. She is now, at least socially, an ex-machine. So for me, "Ex-Machina" was the punch-line at the end of the movie; "Oh, That's what it means!"


3

The mad dog is a metaphor for the madness within society. The instilled racism which forms much of the common narrative is released at this point. Atticus is typically seen as a sensible man the way he tells his children to shoot tins rather than birds etc. Upon killing the mad dog the "injustice" that you are referring to reflects the same treatments of ...


2

According to Lostpedia, the tattoo belongs to the actor and not the character. The words are a line from Strawberry Fields Forever, by the Beatles.


2

In Greek "Deus ex machina" would translate as "O από μηχανής Θεός", which is a term originating for ancient Greek dramatic poetry and especially from tragedy. It meant that a God would be making his appearance before mortals, usually happening at the end of a play thus helping the writer ending his play, by providing a solution or resolving a rather ...


2

This line from Kevin sums up the clear lack of a motive for Kevin’s actions throughout the film (and the book). The book and film is based around the nature/nurture debate - did Kevin grow into a murderer or was he a psycho from the get go? Ultimately it is left to the reader to decide. It would be a relief to get some kind of resolution at the end of the ...


2

Much as I love Tarantino's movies, I've never found them to have nearly as many strong racial messages as he usually claims they do. As you've pointed out, some of the scenes he writes are actually problematic from a racial perspective. However, I do think this movie has some things to say about race, it's just maybe not what we'd expect. The theme of The ...


2

The problem people have with this ending is because they mistakenly place the emphasis on the first part of "You're such a loser, Dad/Just enjoy The Show." The emphasis is actually on the second half, which has been Beane's personal storyline for the entire movie. In the minor leagues--Beane was a minor leaguer for most of his playing career--players refer ...


2

I believe the last line Jake says under his breath in Chinatown is "as little as possible." It refers to his time as a cop in Chinatown when he was told to do "as little as possible" because cops in Chinatown were on the take and looked the other way as part of the deal. But Jake apparently tried to help a woman in Chinatown and as a result she was "hurt." ...


2

I don't know if I agree with the symbolism answer above. Atticus has told Scout that fighting (physical violence) is wrong. He is also a lawyer who only uses persuasion in an attempt to free his client. However, the rabid dog is a direct threat to his family and society. He kills the dog to protect everyone. Scout then realizes that her father is not a ...


1

The red in Rebel without a cause represents the key emotions of the characters. Jim reflects his rebellious natures. Judy's her residual anger, and Plato's peace. Whilst you can view this separately they also wear them in 3 points of the films, Judy at the beginning, Jim in the middle and Plato at the end. You can view this in line with Todorovs theory of ...


1

I'm not sure the painting is significant, or if it's the restaurant itself that is significant. The restaurant shown is the Rules Restaurant, the oldest restaurant in London. The painting shown in Spectre does indeed hang there and doesn't appear to be a particularly famous work. Therefore, I'd suggest the restaurant symbolises a few things: Firstly, M - ...


1

see here : V for Vendetta vs Comics His obsession with words that start with V is limited to "Vi veri universum vivus vici" which is in his house. The entire dialogue loaded with words of V's is a script created by the Wachowskis. The idea is that there was once a man who was captured and taken to a detention centre. He is tortured there and experimented ...


1

This mirrors a real life event. While there is nothing saying they intentionally wanted to imply this, this is well known. American Bomber Pilot Charlie Brown, already flying a shot at plane with injured crew, after a successful bombing run, was trying to return to Allied Territory. German Fighter Pilot Franz Stigler, instead of shooting them down, escorted ...


1

Let's not also forget that really, Frank is just a kid. And kids collect things. I can remember when I was probably 10 or 11, while my mom was clothes shopping, I would sometimes keep myself occupied by running around and collecting labels from clothes. So there's also the distinct possibility that Frank is doing something similar. However, I think a ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible