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9

"He relies on luck", might not be the right choice of words here. I would like to put as "He takes huge risks and he is not afraid of taking on these insanely difficult tasks" In other words, he attempts things, which seem impossible. Hence the name Mission Impossible. In MI 2, we have the rock climbing scene, where he slips and almost falls, but he ...


7

Note the expression 'getting rid of baggage' is usually referring to emotional baggage. The brother's actual journey is accompanied by a kind of 'spiritual journey' as they confront their pasts, analyze their current life & make plans for the future. After this actual & emotional journey, the linked Wikipedia article states: At the station, ...


7

When he says that, he doesn't really speak of some actual supernatural incarnation of the antichrist, but of the antichrist that could be said to symbolically stand behind every factual and concrete evil action of humanity. What he actually says is that the ignorance and evil of men has won yet again. It is a bit of a wordplay supposing the concrete meaning ...


6

Whenever one encounters great art - whether written, filmed, painted, or other - it should be kept in mind that very little of it is accidental. Without going into the merits of the Peabody Award winning series, would you think Dickens, for example, or Shakespeare, or Walt Whitman wrote works with entirely unintentional outcomes? Vince Gilligan has often ...


6

Vince Gilligan: The teddy bear eyeball that Walt found in his swimming pool is symbolic. It's very, very symbolic. However, I'm not sure I can tell you with 100% certainty of what the symbolism is, what it represents...On the face of it, when we were coming up with that eye as an image, it probably, represented some form of the eye of the universe, the ...


4

The writers left if open ended with a nod to the audience that he got away free. 'Breaking Bad': Creator Vince Gilligan explains series finale: On the decision to spare Jesse and allow him to escape “We found over the years that the way we can please the majority of the audience most of the time is to tune out as much extraneous factors as possible ...


2

I always believed it to symbolise the innocence Walter had destroyed staring back at him. If you'll realize, every time he sees it, or it sees him, he is in a pathetic state, ignorant, or just guilty.


1

Jesse is reborn. Walt face his life to let Jesse go and intentionally take the blame. I'm sure Walt didn't go in there thinking he would survive (tying up all loose ends before hand and what not). Besides, the way the show is made, very linear and cut and dry (not in a bad way), if Jesse went to jail, the would've made that very clear.


1

It's comical usage of the name PK, which is a common name as Pankaj Kumar or Prashant Khare and so on, also means drunk. When he asks questions to people which seem absurd to a common man, they ask if he is drunk (bhai pi ke he ka). And continuosly being asked the same Amir Khan eventually starts believing that maybe he is known as PK on earth, somehow earth ...


1

I think it's more than McCall researching Teddy. It's McCall basically saying, I know you, I know where you come from because I've been there myself. This scene is vitally important because it shows that Teddy/Nicolai is not a comic book character but someone whose history has brought him there. And most important, McCall knows Teddy because he probably had ...


1

Ma-Ma is seen playing with a sculpture during the scene where Techie initiates war protocol, shutting down the block. It can be assumed she takes them from him because she likes them. In fact, in the final scene where Ma-Ma is confronted there are in fact 2 wire sculptures. One on the floor by Anderson and the other on her bed. The sculpture is symbolic of ...



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