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Murphy's law is an adage or epigram that is typically stated as: Anything that can go wrong will go wrong. The way is is said in the movie is a quote by mathematician Augustus De Morgan which he gave on June 23, 1866, analyzing Murphy's law "The first experiment already illustrates a truth of the theory, well confirmed by practice, whatever can happen will ...


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I haven't read anything official that would point to this, but I do believe that the shift in Oliver's moral convictions was planned from the start. In the first season, Oliver's alter ego was called The Hood. The Hood had no qualms in killing people he thought deserved it. Come the second season and Oliver has a change of heart. One of the first things he ...


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It was the working title of the film based on his daughters name: Nolan’s father died in 2009, after a year-long battle with cancer that was diagnosed just as the film-maker was finishing Inception, and as Jonah was starting to write Interstellar. His father’s diagnosis was “very much in my mind,” Jonah said, “the connection that you have with your ...


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TL;DR: Kubrick wanted fans who really desired its meaning to either interpret their own meaning from the film, or read Burgess' book to derive the meaning the author intended. Long Answer: In an article with the New Yorker, Anthony Burgess, the author of A Clockwork Orange described how the name came to him: I first heard the expression “as queer as a ...


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I have to contradict Ankit's otherwise theoretically sound answer, be it just because it is a bit too negative for such a positivistic movie. In the first minutes of the movie Cooper at least gives us his and his late wife's own interpretation of Murphy's Law (and the reason why he named his daughter after it), which I would extrapolate to also be the ...


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SlashFilm suggested the following connection: The title [of the episode] is a direct reference to the song “A Horse with No Name,” by the band America, and Walt is shown singing the lyrics at the ep’s beginning and end. On both occasions he’s blindly visited by two threats in the clashing forms of law and chaos. It’s a great use of music because, ...


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TL;DR The Third Man's iconic zither theme was chosen by the film's director Carol Reed because it compliments the dialogue without overpowering it; the tune is exotic yet local and matches the movie's atmosphere because it evokes the mood in post-war Vienna and is elusive, charming and mysterious just like the city and the titular character himself. Long ...


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In the introduction scene of Ronan, he said to a Xandarian Because I do not forgive your people for taking the life of my father, and his father and his father before him. A thousand years of war between us will not be forgotten. Clearly this looks a solid motive to me. Revenge for his family. I don't know about the actual comics but in the movie ...


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It sounds like ABC just didn't care much about the show anymore, but trying to cash in on a sudden spike in popularity as the series came to a close. I found this statement by KateR on a Richard Dean Anderson fan forum (because that exists): After season six, MacGyver was only picked up for a half season, which is 13 episodes. They left Vancouver and ...


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Antoine Fuqua and Gerard Butler both discussed this in a video interview, showing they were definitely aware of the Die Hard connection and they both loved Bruce Willis' works. In fact, they viewed it as the daddy of all action films. Paraphrasing from the interview, they both drew distinct differences between Die Hard and Olympus Has Fallen, discussing how ...


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I think @System Down has summed up all the imported points. Just to add something though, here is an interview from Time Magazine the shows co-creator, Mark Guggenheim, where he discussed the change of direction in Season 2 compared to Season 1: TIME: Were there different sorts of things you wanted to accomplish with Season 2 compared with Season 1? ...


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The wiki Theme section describes the movie thus: Themes The film frequently blurs the line between fiction and reality, especially highlighting the act of observation. The character Paul breaks the fourth wall throughout the film and addresses the camera in various ways. As he directs Ann to look for her dead dog, he turns, winks, and smirks at the ...


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IMHO there are two pieces of evidence strongly suggesting the answer to this question is no: Julianne Moore appears to be about the same age in both movies. But in "Carrie" her daughter is a high-school senior, while in "Don Jon" the daughter would not have been conceived yet. The timelines don't seem to mesh. "Don Jon" and "Carrie" are two different ...


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As you said, Dennis is ostensibly a psychopath and sociopath. One of the main forms of satire that the show has used is to mock the manner in which most formulaic sitcoms have progressed from season to season, where the cast and characters become more and more beautiful and interesting and one-note. For example, with Seinfeld, you can see Kramer's ...


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Firstly, you have failed to look at the times frames involved. Oscar killed Reeva on the 14th of February 2013. Gone Girl was in the works a long time before the murder "Gone Girl is a film adaptation of Flynn's 2012 novel of the same name, and the author also wrote the adapted screenplay. One of the film's producers, Leslie Dixon, read the manuscript of ...


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My reading is similar (but not the same) as G Blake Meike's. The ring symbolises a more noble/idealist Frank, taking it off isn't to allow him to toughen his knuckles, but is him "taking the gloves off", and entering the bare knuckle fight. The dialogue with Walker is a a Freudian thing, his humanity (or conscience) warning Walker that the fight is now on ...



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