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15

My best answer comes from an answer that was given to this same question in 2006: Adult Myers is introduced in the screenplay as a shape jumping on the back of Marion's car. Therefore, for script consistency, the term was used for the rest of the draft and eventually the series. Also, there is further explanation and links to the script here. ...


10

Judging from this interview between Suzanne Collins and Scholastic, there doesn't seem to be any other meaning in the name of Panem other than the Latin phrase which is why she chose it: In keeping with the classical roots, I send my tributes into an updated version of the Roman gladiator games, which entails a ruthless government forcing people to fight ...


8

Kitchen Nightmares was based on a show in the UK called Ramsay's Kitchen Nightmares. This piece is taken verbatim from the Wiki page, which is backed by other sources: Critics have commented that Fox's adaptation of Kitchen Nightmares strayed from the strengths of the original Channel 4 series. Maureen Ryan of the Chicago Tribune said, "Leave it to ...


5

lets go through one by one Shephard - The main character in mass effect is not named after firefly but instead named after Alan Shepard who was an American naval officer and aviator, test pilot, flag officer, one of the original NASA Mercury Seven astronauts, and businessman, who in 1961 became the second person and the first American to travel into space. ...


4

This is going to be subjective at best, because (as you've pointed out) any movie can be interpreted any number of ways in order to facilitate a certain goal. Fahrenheit 9-11 features an interview with a serving US Soldier who states that, in homage to the film, their tank division plays loud music at the enemy as a way of intimidating them. The song he ...


3

Yes, he liked all of the food in "Momma Cherrie's Soul Food Shack" way back then in Britain, for example. He even praised it for being so tender. There was also an episode of the US ...


3

I was thinking maybe the author also intended to incorporate "Pan-Am", as in Pan America, into the name of the country as well, since Panem seems to include all of the former USA, and possibly Canada as well. That reasoning does not make very much sense. As you say, Pan-Am would mean Pan-America, which translates to "The complete/whole America". From ...


3

First of all, you have to keep in mind that the movie repeatedly plays with and takes advantage from the fact that in dreams you don't always know how things happen. The movie doesn't have to provide any explanation of how someone gets to a certain place or how something just appears out of nothing as there is none. In the same way it is not really relevant ...


2

The only information in the original version of the film is the last line spoken by an unknown African American in a suit, who presumably works for Izon or the military: We'll take that to Darcy and see if anything recorded on it The fact he said "recorded on it" implies it's some kind of sensor device, such as a camera, microphone or other more ...


2

While watching the movie, especially during the parking lot scene, the shot gets switched from POV (which is unusual since most of the movie is shot in POV), I convinced myself that the shot is switched from the POV 'cause the victim (a lady) is out of sight from Frank and director wanted the audience to show where the victim is and how she's terrified of ...


2

TLDR: First sign of "darkness": Season 2, Episode 6. In it for himself: Sometime in Season 5. Full Answer: In my own opinion, the first glimpse I had of Walt's true nature was way back in Episode 6 of Season 2 - Peekaboo. In this episode, Gretchen Schwartz visits the White household and is thanked by Skyler for giving the money to Walt for his cancer ...


1

If you just look at the movie -- ignoring or forgetting that it was based on a novel -- then there is a very clear theme that ties between all the stories and characters, and it is presented quite eloquently in one of the final scenes by Jim Sturgess as Adam Ewing, when he stands in front of his monstrous father and is attacked with a series of rhetorical ...


1

The 2012 movie is based on the 2004 novel by David Mitchell. So I am trying to interpret the whole story from the book's point. perhaps if somebody asked, what is the theme of the movie or the book, it would fall in same context as your question. Book's author has said the following about the book Literally all of the main characters, except one, are ...


1

Although, it is highly unclear who's portrait it is, it resembles to one of Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn's (a Dutch painter and etcher from the 17th century) self portraits. It can also be a rework by someone based on Rembrandt's portraits, but that is unclear as well. By the image it looks like it "could" be a self portrait of Rembrandt as he perceived ...


1

I think it is pretty definitive by the time of Buyout (S. 5 Ep. 6). From the sub-titles: Walter: Jesse, you asked me if I was in the meth business or the money business. Neither. I'm in the empire business.


1

In Expressionism, the medium itself is expressive. An expressionist painting shows emotion in the quality of its brushstrokes, in the amount of paint used, in the colors, in the size, in the texture. Expressionism is generally not realistic in its imagery. It seeks to create a visceral response in its presentation. Expressionistic photography or ...


1

"forgiveness is a running theme under all the major characters" I agree. Women refuse to forgive the innocent cowboy even after he showed sincere remorse, perhaps because what they knew they already did (hire assassins). Most importantly, Munny never forgave himself over what he had done in the past, felt sure he was going to hell. And he certainly will ...


1

The scene between Sherlock and John, where Sherlock is having an emotional break down in "Hounds of Baskerville", is similar to a scene in an episode of Star Trek called "Naked Time" where Spock has an emotional break down and confesses to feeling shame when he feels friendship towards Jim Kirk, his captain and best friend. In "Baskerville", Sherlock angrily ...


1

I don't think the Mike Yanagita subplot advances the plot at all. Some of the things said above don't add up. What brings Marge back to the car dealership isn't renewed suspicion of Jerry, but the fact that records showed that the perpetrators called Shep Proudfoot, who works there. When she goes back to Jerry, she seems as credulous as ever, but she does ...



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