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Bateman is a psychotic schizophrenic and none of the events depicted actually happened. Looking at the evidence presented by the movie, we see Batemen commit acts that anyone as high profile as him could not have done without raising at least some questions. During the film we are presented his crazy subconscious mind that allows him to easily obtain a ...


9

Black Comedy and Satire are not quite two forms of the same thing. Satire is not always funny and is used to convey a message on a topic, while Black Comedy can be a part of a Satirical message. If you are familiar at all with the movie M*A*S*H, it is a black comedy about the Korean War. The Television series of the same name that spawned from that movie ...


5

It's been a while since I saw the movie, but my impression was that the events in the move are not meant to be imaginary. I remember Bateman kills someone and then pretends the apartment is his own. That is where he leaves the bodies of his victims. Bateman at some point spray-paints "Die Yuppie Scum!" on the wall. One of the conceits of the film is that ...


5

I had never seen this movie until 2013, catching bits & pieces on HBO, then finally DVR'd the thing and watched it several times. One of the funniest movies ever and Christin Bale is brilliant. The main point: ALL the murders happen in his head. Here's my interpretation (and, isn't that what it's all about?): Several characters have actually seen ...


4

I actually have never seen this film, but I've heard a lot about the book as well as the film adaptation and it is my understanding that there is a proposed question as to whether or not any of the events in the story really took place at all. I believe that Bateman is a proposed schizophrenic and being that the story follows according to his perspective, ...


4

This link explains it well. Brett Easton Ellis says that some of the murders were in his head, but he did kill. In other novels that Bateman has appeared in people have mysterioulsy vanished. Did the murders really happen, or did Bateman just imagine it all? This is the most frequently asked question in relation to the film, and the answer remains ...


4

I always thought it was a running gag. At the time this movie came out, home video rental was at its height, and your local Blockbuster was always pretty full. I remember working in one around this time and the traffic was pretty insane. So, it was pretty much a safe alibi to say that. Since he used the same excuse over and over, the repetitiveness made ...


4

I think the scene is ambiguous... EITHER the lawyer mistakes Bateman for some other guy Davis - as a repeating theme in the story is someone mistaking person A for person B OR the lawyer pretends to mistake Bateman for Davis in order to avoid discussing the confession IN WHICH CASE the lawyer might think Bateman is crazy and fantasized the murders OR ...


2

It might help to not think of black comedy as being defined as being humor about "cannibalism, rape, genocide, terminal illnesses," but rather to think of it as gallows humor. Gallows humor is, loosely, defined as humor in the face of impossible situations. The most famous historical example is probably Oscar Wilde, on his death bed, saying "either that ...


2

The author of the book and the director of the film are both clear that the murders are real not imaginary. As for the disappearing bodies...that's never made clear..and I think that adds to the mystery and makes you come to your own conclusions....but like I said, interviews with the director and author make it clear that the murders were real.


1

I think that was the beauty of the movie, we really did not know if he was insane committing these crimes or insane imagining himself committing these crimes. Or if all, some or none of these events actually took place. Maybe he is in a nut ward imagining all this?! The movie started as a first person narrative and can be assumed to have continued as ...


1

In my opinion, everything happened in his mind all and the acts of murder were fantasized and drawn out on paper. When he killed the blonde hooker with the chainsaw (it was actually a metaphor of breaking up with his girl friend who is also blonde) the murder took place in his mind and was drawn out on the table at the restaurant during the break up. I ...



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