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24

According to this article I found (written in 2010) - individual movie titles can not be copyrighted. However, there can be a trademark granted if there is a certain level of recognition of the title to the specific movie. The author of the article cites "Star Wars" or "Citizen Kane". Per the linked article, the MPAA has a Title Registration Bureau which ...


14

Well first of all I'm not sure the premise of your question is true. I can think of several movies off hand with just white actors in significant speaking roles. If you reduce it to 'a majority of modern Hollywood movies' then your observations might be closer to the mark, but I don't think this is down to any form of explicit policy of positive ...


12

The answer is, they don't. And I quote: Literary titles – such as book or movie titles – fall in a gray area in U.S. law. For instance, although a book or movie is protected by copyright, its title isn’t. Copyright simply doesn’t cover titles. And even if the title is distinctive, such as The 40-Year-Old Virgin, courts and the Trademark ...


10

Several of the non-US movies you named are in foreign languages. Although foreign films are often available with English subtitles or voice overs, I'd guess that many people prefer to watch movies where the original dialogue is in their native language. Additionally, the style of foreign movies is different than their Hollywood remakes. I haven't seen the ...


10

Question: Is there any time limits for the running time of the movies in Hollywood? Fact 1. Let us categorized first what Hollywood movies are. Hollywood is a district in Los Angeles, California. Due to its fame and cultural identity as the historical center of movie studios and movie stars, the word Hollywood is often used as a metonym of American ...


9

After thinking about it and reading the other answers (thank you Lauren and mootinator) I came up with a possible explanation. I don't know if it is correct though. It can be - as often - about money. It makes not much sense for European/Indian/Chinese filmmakers to produce a remake of a Hollywood-movie (at least directly after the original), as everyone ...


9

It's worth noting that mirrors (and any other reflective material for that matter) are a well-used narrative tool for presenting the duality of characters on screen, whether they are protagonists or antagonists (or, more likely, somewhere in between). As DForck42 has already pointed out, there are many urban legends and stories connected to mirrors as well ...


8

When we're talking about Hollywood, we usually talk about big budget movies. Studios fund these movie projects not out of love of art, but to make a profit. To make a sizable profit they need to sell the movie to the audience so that they buy tickets (and buy DVDs and BluRays ... etc). One of the bigger selling points of any movies is the cast. People will ...


8

I have not seen many examples of Hollywood movies shown first in the rest of the world before the USA, but it is certainly the case that simultaneous release around the world is now normal when it used to be rare. If the trend has continued beyond 'simultaneous' to now opening in the rest of the world first, it is probably for the same reason. There are ...


7

Ghost stories and mirrors have shared some common ground. Take the Bloody Mary urban legend (turn the lights off and say "Bloody Mary" three times and her ghost will come rip your eyes out). Some mirror urban legends I can't find a good list, but there are a few ghost stories and urban legends tied to mirrors.


6

This is a hard (if not impossible question to answer, seeing that many early films have been lost in fires etc.) but I will try point you in the right direction. Seeing as dialog is a factor in your question the film must have been made after 1927, when the jazz singer was announced as the first "talkie". Then we have a span of 11 years where the movie you ...


6

You might be interested in the case of the film The Butler which just came out recently. The film's title was up for a possible rename due to a Motion Picture Association of America claim from Warner Bros., which had inherited from the defunct Lubin Company a now-lost 1916 silent short film with the same name.[9][31] The case was subsequently resolved ...


5

A wikipedia search gave me the following information: Competition from television drew audiences away from movie theaters in the late 1950s, and the theatrical cartoon began its decline. Today, animated cartoons are produced mostly for television. American television animation of the 1950s featured quite limited animation styles, highlighted by the ...


5

In some cases the original delay involved the time required for licensing (music), appropriate copyrights, ratings, and in some cases the redubbing of the film into other languages. The latter of which can not typically begin until the final edit is determined. In some major films (especially action films) the final edit may not be complete until the film ...


5

Films with subtitles don't get as many viewers, especially in the UK and US where we expect everyone else to speak English. People will watch remakes of foreign films, and the studio knows that the film played well in its original market so it's a fairly safe investment. Take Girl With A Dragon Tattoo - the original was good, but not in English. Its a ...


4

The question contains the answer, in that only successful foreign films are re-made in the US. They are re-made because the industry knows that if a concept is a hit in one major country, the concept has a good chance of succeeding in the US mass market. American hits can often be exported directly to other countries' mass markets, without having to be ...


3

My understanding is that the US, being a huge market and often at least a third of the film's worldwide revenue, can be used to push up if hype is a factor. With the Avengers, if they know in advance it's going to be a success - and franchises tend to do well worldwide - especially superhero ones, releasing internationally only intensifies the hype back in ...


3

At least part of the reason has to be that the Hollywood folks want a big opening weekend splash. If an excellent non-US movie has been out for awhile, chances are many of the US people who would want to see the movie have already seen it. I wondered the same thing about ABC remaking Being Erica, a Canadian series into a US version, given that our cultures ...


3

Although there seems to be a a good length defined for Hollywood movies, Bollywood produced 2.30 hours length movies. There are a number of reasons for that: 1)Bollywood movies are long because they do have singing and dancing, but it also gives the masses a chance to get out of the heat of India and into some air conditioning. The singing/dancing added to ...


3

Wikipedia says The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, the American Film Institute and the British Film Institute, all define a feature as a film with a running time of 40 minutes or longer. The Centre National de la Cinématographie in France defines it as a 35 mm film longer than 1,600 metres, which is exactly 58 minutes and 29 seconds ...


2

As the other answers pointed out, there are a lot of urban legends related to mirrors and reflections. And also, whenever we look in a mirror, we see ourselves, but everything is inverted (Horizontally). So horror movies may employ this observation to show that we (or someone) is seeing a laterally inverted personality or character (for example, it may ...


2

It seems to me there are often movies of the same title in the same year. IMDb keeps track of them with Roman numerals. Like this: Action Figures (2011/I) Action Figures (2011/II)


1

If there is a limit, it's no longer than three months. Two movies titled Nine came out in the second half of 2009. One is an all-CGI animated SF film with "stitchpunks" that look like a grown-up version of Sackboy from the later PS3 game LittleBigPlanet, released in September 2009. The other is an unrelated musical drama directed by Rob Marshall starring ...


1

According to this article, it has a lot to do with how the market in other countries is becoming a bigger factor these days, movies can make more money in other countries than in the US if it's good enough. From other things I've read it also has to do with piracy, people in America pirating a theatrical release, then distributing it on the internet for the ...


1

I think it dates back to the times of 'Mandrake & Lothar'. Negroes were used as assistants and later as sidekicks (referring to the jobs they actually used to get). Gradually, they started entering mainstream roles.


1

It's about dominance and industry. Hollywood is A) an industry, and B) a US propaganda tool. Neither of them works optimally if there is competition. So it's kind of modus operandi for hollywood to take successful pieces of cinema art and hollywoodise them, so that their public keep watching the same old actors, same old crap.



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