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24

Wikipedia's Film Editing page defines many of these cuts. I will try to summarize the questioned ones here. Editor's Cut: An editor's cut (sometimes referred to as the "Assembly edit" or "Rough cut") is normally the first pass of what the final film will be when it reaches picture lock. Additional: The article says that editing starts right after ...


24

James Cameron has been asked this a few times in the past weeks to the release of the movie, and he has said he did not want to change anything about the movie past adding 3D. However, it seems he admits to making a change while interviewing with a British magazine Culture. James Cameron resisted temptation to cut scenes he was no longer happy with when ...


22

There are 4 different endings: Theatrical Ending: Evan travels back to the birthday party where he first meets Kayleigh and whispers to her "I hate you and if you ever come near me again I'll kill you and your whole damn family." Kayleigh runs away crying.   After a montage of his memories disintegrating, Evan returns to present day ...


13

There are indications that other prologue narrations were considered, and you might find what you are looking for on the Extended Edition DVD. From the DVD Journal review of The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring: Extended Edition Under the menu for Visualizing the Story you'll find a featurette called Storyboards and Pre-Viz: Making Words ...


13

I'll admit I'd never seen it in cinema, so I was unaware of some of these bits. The only reason I could see to cut those bits would possibly to alter the censor ratings, it's a well known fact that sometimes films (and tv series) when rated get given one thing for cinema/broadcast but when they are put onto a media format sometimes the show/films wants to ...


12

I just re-watched the scene on the "Widescreen Limited Edition" version of A New Hope. This is the one that contained not only the re-mastered and Lucas-ized update done in 2006, but also a copy of the earlier print that was not restored. (And you can see a lot of clarity and picture stability issues in it.) In that print, Luke throws the line and hook, ...


8

Well, there is an alternate ending, which is available on the DVD release. From Kotaku.com (there is a video of the alternate ending on the site): In the theatrical version, Eddie has apparently managed to kick the brain-enhancing drug, although we're never entirely sure if he's grandstanding. After Robert De Niro threatens Cooper's new political ...


8

I did a little bit of online research on this, and it would appear that the American distributors considered the movie too long, complicated and controversial and employed the playwright Channing Pollock to make a new version. The American release was considerably shorter than the original (at 115 minutes it was about 25% shorter than the original) and ...


7

The gimmick in Gremlins 2: The New Batch with the projector is actually inspired by the film The Tingler which first introduced it. Apparently The Tingler was screened in theaters and in drive-ins. When the film went black, a voice warned: Ladies and gentlemen, please do not panic. But scream! Scream for your lives! The Tingler is loose in this theater! ...


7

You saw the alternate ending, then. As for your friend, he is slightly mistaken. Will Smith actually blew himself up in the theatrical release. On the Wiki page, you can check out the Alternate Ending and Home Media sections to see where it's available. Also, this IMDB page details the differences. With specific reference to your question: The ...


6

The theatrical version of a movie is the one that was originally shown in theaters. Thus it is the cut of the movie that the studio thought would be best for the most moviegoers. An extended version or uncut version has scenes added that were filmed but cut out of the theatrical version. Most often, it is created to entice people have already been to the ...


4

I don't quite get what you meant by, I found it weird that the first ending would not compromise the other (it's like a happy ending where the viewer doesn't know what happened to his mother or to the main character's "gift") Anyway, the way I understood is this: The original ending was the ending which Evan was in a psychiatric hospital- he is in a ...


4

The Theatrical Cut is the version of the film that was shown at cinemas. The Director's Cut is the version edited by the Director, usually for additional home media releases. An Extended Cut is usually any version of the film which is longer than the theatrical cut (though in very rare cases, its shorter). Which one you should pick is an opinion that's up ...


4

I know you may not want to hear this, but is it possible you're mis-remembering things? It would be against the law for the film to be released under a different cut on home video without it being re-assessed by the BBFC. As you can see on their website, however, no changes were made. (The running-time difference due to the change in frame rate from film ...


4

No. Commercial breaks happened (presumably) during mundane events or periods of inactivity. The clock would pick up again when they returned from commercial break. The clock never ended at 42:00, it always ended at 60:00.


4

Not a definite answer, but I could find no indication that there ever was a director's cut of Jackie Brown (or any other version that differs from the theatrical one). However, there are a few deleted scenes that are included on Bluray and DVD: Extended scene with Jackie/Sheronda in the mall's food court. Extended scene with Jackie and Ray in the ...


3

IMDb is usually the place to find such information. 1 hr 39 min (99 min) (theatrical) (Germany) 2 hr (120 min) (Berlin International) (Germany) 1 hr 34 min (94 min) (DVD) (Australia) There do appear to be other versions floating around. This review (and others) suggests that at least one DVD release was only 89 minutes long although the ...


3

This fantastic post over at IMDB explains the differences in a lot of detail (given its length, I've chosen to just link to it rather than copy and paste it in its entirety). Edit A summary of some differences (note, the link above is far more comprehensive and descriptive). This is intended for all people who have seen the US version and are wondering ...


3

I'm going to say no. Firstly, on this IMDB page, some of the differences between the versions are listed. The scene you refer to is described: In the original television version, there is more dialogue in the "no shirt, no shoes, no dice" scene. Spicoli says "I have uno nickel-ette...and a pick". He then makes up a story of how Mick Jagger gave ...


3

I also can confirm that the church scene was censored in Latin America. I saw the movie in Utah and then last night in Panama. The church scene in Panama only included the first woman Galahad shoots, cuts of Eggsy's reactions, Merlin's reactions, a couple of guys thrown around from Galahad's POV, Valentine and Gazelle's reactions, then cut to Galahad ...


3

The Wikipedia article for the movie states that: The original American release of the film shows Hammer and Velda escaping from the burning house at the end, running into the ocean as the words "The End" come over them on the screen. Sometime after its first release, the ending was crudely altered on the film's original negative, removing over a minute's ...


3

He re-rendered the stars in the sky over the sinking ship to make them accurate. http://news.discovery.com/space/neil-degrasse-tyson-tightens-titanic-accuracy-120402.html (and widely reported elsewhere).


3

Short of finding a magical, perfectly preserved version of Disney's original Pinocchio and paying someone to master a DVD/BluRay/Digital copy from it, you don't really have many (if any) options and you're going to have to settle for something. Low-quality VHS copies (and even DVDs) can't be made better quality. If Disney decided to do some repairs to the ...


3

I know of 4 major versions - the original releases, the 1997 Special Editions, the 2004 DVD editions, and the 2011 Blu-Ray editions. The most significant alterations were those done for the 1997 Special Editions. The changes were made for a number of reasons - to improve the special effects; to insert scenes that had been cut for practical, logistical, ...


2

I am not sure, there seemed be some subtle differences in the sound and several short reaction shots early on that I don't remember from previous viewings. All my previous viewings have been Regal or AMC, this is the first time I have seen it at Cinemark. Their different sound system may be making me imagine differences that aren't there. If there are ...


2

I don't know if it was ever included in a print of the film, but I found a "documentary" that played on Nick at Nite on YouTube that is exactly the footage you are describing:


2

Firstly, people in different parts of India speak different languages, so, If a movie is made with reputed cast and crew then the producers are likely to dub the movie in different languages such that people all over India would enjoy watching movie in their native language. Also remember that the movies with high budget are the ones mostly get dubbed in ...


2

Whilst it is no longer 'common' for films to be produced in different languages, as the dawn of the 'sound era' of cinema this was standard practice. The original Dracula is the most notorious version of this: During the day MGM would shoot with Bela Lugosi, then in the evenings the Spanish crew would take over the set and continue filming with Carlos ...


2

One version has a very amusing line of sexual dialogue removed from it, which is a shame. While it doesn't make much difference to the plot the cut is a little disjointed and it is quite obvious that something was cut out which takes you out of the experience. Having seen a version with the original line still in I was expecting to share a laugh with people ...



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