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14

You ask a complicated question! There are arguments for Hitchcock as feminist, but the bulk of the literature I have seen is more inclined to label him as a misogynist (not to mention fetishist, sadist and voyeur). The icy blondes that were his trademark may have been strong characters on film, but in life were very much under his control. He not only ...


14

  In 1962 François Truffaut interviewed Alfred Hitchcock rather extensively. About 12 hours of audio has been broadcast on french radio. You can listen to the 25 parts here. In part 15 Hitchcock talks about "Rope" (I transcribed it myself, so please excuse any errors): I don't know why I really indulged in the stunt, I can only call it a stunt, ...


10

Manichitrathazhu story is influenced from a tragedy that happened in Alummoottil Tharavadu, a famous central Travancore family, in the 19th century. Here heroine suffers from personality disorder and some strange things happen, solves problem with exorcism and psychiatry. Where as in Vertigo, a retired police detective suffering from acrophobia who is hired ...


10

To add to Christian Rau's answer, here is an outtake from Wikipedia: When filming Rope (1948), Alfred Hitchcock intended for the film to have the effect of one long continuous take, but the cameras available could hold no more than 1000 feet of 35 mm film. As a result, each take used up to a whole roll of film and lasts up to 10 minutes. Many takes end ...


8

I think that the long takes, or just a single take as it should look for the audience, fit perfectly to the fact that the whole movie is set at a single small place. Those two aspects contribute to the impression that we are actually watching a play instead of a movie (as also stated in this answer to a different question). To me this had two at first ...


7

Psycho opened to very mixed reviews. A summary of a few are found on it's wikipedia page. The bad reviews called it a blot on Hitchcock's career, a gimmick movie, and that it looked like a TV show padded out to two hours. One of my film professors hated it, saying that "you shouldn't need to explain the ending of your movie in your movie."


6

The American Film Institute has a synopsis that explains: The police apprehend Thorwald, who confesses that he deposited most of his wife’s body in the East River, except for her head, which he first buried in the garden and then packed in a hatbox.


6

In a lot of ways, Rope (1948) has inspired a number of feature films. Two that come to mind are Rear Window (1954) and Murder by Numbers (2002). Rope is always a film this writer will suggest to people at the end of the day. In many ways Rope represents a time period where Hitchcock was trying to try something new. After all, the film is an ...


5

The detective is trying to make sense of the picture, as detectives are tasked with trying to make sense of things in any given case. The picture could also be seen as a representation of Lina's frazzled state of mind.


5

Foremost Hitchcock critic Robin Wood has written two books on Hitchcock’s films which are available through your local library’s InterLibrary Loan (ILL) service if you live in the US (and a number of other countries as well): Hitchcock's Films (1977) and Hitchcock's Films Revisited (1989). He also wrote several essays in the book A Hitchcock Reader ...


5

Hitchcock likely received bad reviews as commonly as any filmmaker did in his day or ours. Criticism is by definition made in the eye of the beholder: a subjective review. The thrust of your question appears to be more about "how did viewers react to socially shocking elements" in Hitch's films. That question, I would suggest, is self-answering. Hitchcock ...


5

The New York Times on The Trouble with Harry: "It is not a particularly witty or clever script that John Michael Hayes has put together from a novel by Jack Trevor Story, nor does Mr. Hitchcock's direction make it spin. The pace is leisurely, almost sluggish, and the humor frequently is strained."


4

I had the impression for years that his last movie Family Plot was widely panned, but cannot substantiate it right now. All the reviews I currently see use mild terms like "witty relaxed lark" (Canby), "not exactly top-tier" (Anderson), mixed in with others that list it as a "complicated delight" (Ebert). So, is this fawning, lackadaisical praise for a ...


3

I don't find any similarities between Vertigo, and also I feel other south indian remakes of Manichithrathazhu seems to be medically incorrect where Ganga's anger is wrongly directed to lead hero's character. Manichithrathazhu script is said to be an work inspired from the case dairies of a Psychiatrist. It is evident from the way the movie has made with a ...


3

While Hartz may have been a construct based on Lashley, according to TCM, with small changes to the beginning and ending, Hitchcock directed the film as it had been written by Sidney Gilliat and Frank Launder. Any construct would have been theirs: Hitchcock was trying to find a film to end his contract with [Edward] Black so he could sign a deal with ...


3

I believe this is a short from 1973 called Norman Nurdelpick's Suspension: A Tribute to Alfred Hitchcock. I can't seem to find a clip of it anywhere. However, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Science (e.g. the Oscars, The Academy Awards, etc) started a Student Academy Awards in 1973. A full list of winners can be found here and Norman Nurdelpick's ...


2

I watched The Lady Vanishes this afternoon, followed by several hours of perusing databases and books about Hitchcock, and it is difficult to answer your question with any sense of definition because 1) Hitchcock never gave an interview about the film, and 2) he shot it as written, so the result is a mix of his influence with the writers' influence. ...


1

My first reaction was it was done with Steadicam, except Frenzy came out in 1972 and Steadicam was first used in 1976. I found a description of how the shot was done here. A camera jib was used for the interior shot, and a dolly ws used for the exterior. There is actually an edit in the shot, hidden by the man walking in front of the camera just as the ...


1

As per the Trivia page for "Frenzy" on IMDB: Midway through the film, there is a famous continuous shot in which the camera backs away from the door of Rusk's upper-floor apartment and descends the staircase, seemingly without a cut, to the ground level, out the building's front door, and then to the opposite side of the street. The interiors were shot ...



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