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26

One thing you have to understand is that the book this movie was based on had a missing last chapter in American books. In the American books, the last chapter mirrored the last part of the film. In the UK version, the last chapter shows that Alex was 'cured' as much as possible, in that he ultimately gave up on violence of his own free will. See the ...


12

In this context, the phrase "of deepest summer" means something like "in the middle of summer"... in other words, a time when the weather is as summery as possible, and as far as possible from the other seasons.


7

According to IMDb, he did not have to hold his breath. They used an oxygen tank: In the Warner Brothers DVD, McDowell does a commentary track and talks about how he used an oxygen tank while he was under the water. He never mentions that it failed or that he almost drowned. Also on one of the documentaries on the DVD, the commentator mentions that ...


6

IMHO, the final scene in the movie shows Alex's priorities have changed: he formerly enjoyed being a criminal who operated outside of society, but now he looks forward to a more socially acceptable lifestyle -- while still retaining some of his wild nature. Note the scene appears to be a fantasy Alex experiences just after he agrees to play along with the ...


6

After being released, he is attacked by vagrants. I believe that if he was faking, he would have defended himself. Instead, two bobbies come along and save him. They turn out to be his old "droogs" Dim and Georgie who then also beat him up. I believe that if he was faking then he would have tried to protect himself.


5

According to this screenplay, "Rubinstein, Julian and Dolin also listening to Beethoven played loudly on tape recorder." Julian is his manservant (pink shirt), and Dolin (foreground) and Rubinstein are political cronies. Rubinstein is played by Margaret Tyzack, Julian by David Prowse, and Dolin by John Savident. A description of the scene is on page 165 of ...


4

If he was faking about being "cured" and being non-violent, was he also faking about Beethoven music making him ill? Because that drove him so mad he attempted suicide by jumping out a window, seriously injuring himself. I think if he had been faking his cure he would not have gone to such extreme lengths to prove it. Also, as I mentioned in commenting on ...


3

I'm of the opinion Kubrick changed the story so that in the movie, Alex was faking that the conditioning worked. Basically I was convinced by the case made by this analysis from a guy named Rob Ager. Here's a key excerpt: In the book Alex spouts his own objection as the preacher and Minister debate the morality of the Ludovico technique, “Me, me, me. ...


2

In the book, Alex is hooked up to a brain monitor and his brain's activity is watched. The people conducting the experiment can see clearly that he is having a response to the treatment. You may be able to trick people but not a brain monitor.


1

I thought Alex was faking his cure, but I thought his sickness was real when he heard the 9th. I believe Alex was faking because before he signed up for the treatment he was the model prisoner, and wanted out, even if it meant he would have to stop his violence. I also think the fake burp is very note worthy, as well as the minister choosing Alex because ...


1

What Barry says could be correct, but I doubt Mr Kubrick would show anything that goes against proven science. The conditioning shown in this movie is also known as Pavlovian conditioning. In short, Pavlovian conditioning says that once your mind is conditioned to perform certain activities in the presence of certain stimuli(external or otherwise), it will ...



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