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24

James Cameron has been asked this a few times in the past weeks to the release of the movie, and he has said he did not want to change anything about the movie past adding 3D. However, it seems he admits to making a change while interviewing with a British magazine Culture. James Cameron resisted temptation to cut scenes he was no longer happy with when ...


23

In 3D films, the 3D glasses are the reason for the dimness.Because the 3-D glasses are darkly coated with polarized filter that decode the images and give them depth dim. I've found a good link and let me summarize the stuff from that site. According to the so-called father of 3-D cinema, Lenny Lipton, because it projects two separate pictures, viewers ...


12

2D to 3D Video Conversion is the process of transforming the original 2D video to a 3D form, which in almost all cases is stereo, so it is the process of creating imagery for each eye from one 2D image. That is why the transformation is also called 2D to stereo 3D conversion, or stereo conversion. Two approaches to stereo conversion can be loosely ...


12

The Dark Flaw in 3D's Bright Future: The figure of 16 foot-lamberts is the standard established by the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers for a projector with no film in it. If you add a 2D film to a projector that meets the brightness standard, you’ll generally wind up with about 14 foot-lamberts, considered an appropriate level of ...


8

There is a huge difference in the feeling of the film based upon the Frames Per Second it was shot in. There are a number of films that were shot using a digital camera, but at a higher 30FPS that were reviewed to have a "poor quality or feel" because the faster shutter rate gave it a television feeling. Many professional digital camera now shoot at the ...


7

From the Disney Blu-ray 3D help site: When you're watching a 3D/2D compatible disc in 2D, you are actually watching a single eye view of your film (i.e. the left eye or right eye only). I would imagine this is the method used in theaters as modern 3D films are digital projections and thus can be altered accordingly - so Christian was on the right track.


5

3D movies are normally filmed using two slightly offset cameras. Both images are projected onto the viewing screen, with those plastic glasses feeding one image into your left eye and the other into your right. When a film was not shot using two offset cameras, the conversion involves manual identification of different depths in the shot, as summarized in ...


4

Quoting Peter Jackson: ...it's like watching a movie where the flicker and the strobing and the motion blur what we've been used to seeing all of our lives -- I mean, all our lives in the cinema -- suddenly that just disappears. It goes. And you've got this incredibly vivid, realistic looking image. And you've got sharpness because there's no ...


4

There doesn't appear to be any official rating system, disappointingly. As a previous user @Pubby answered, what you are referring to is the "depth" of the film (as per Wikipedia): Depth perception is the visual ability to perceive the world in three dimensions (3D) and the distance of an object. A few websites have had users try and champion a ...


4

The term would be depth (or rather, the illusion of depth), although I haven't seen any actual ratings of it. Films that really seem to pop are generally filmed in 3D and then enhanced post-production when adding in special effects.


2

He re-rendered the stars in the sky over the sinking ship to make them accurate. http://news.discovery.com/space/neil-degrasse-tyson-tightens-titanic-accuracy-120402.html (and widely reported elsewhere).


2

There are two key issues with higher frame rates. One is simply that more information can be transmitted at higher frame rates (if the recording was done at the higher rate: just showing the same frame twice as some TVs do doesn't really make much difference). The second is supposed to be that double rate overcomes a major limitation of 3D which is a loss of ...


2

Major S, I would suggest that the focal point in any given shot is not determined by the editor, but by the director of photography and the director. In many instances the DP works in conjunction with the gaffer to light the scene so that the focal point (be it a character or object) is highlighted in accordance to the director's wishes. This set-up ...


1

Imagine a movie as a flipbook. Higher FPS = more pages in the flipbook. More pages doesn't affect the actual quality of each page, just the motion between the pages.



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