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9

tl;dr: The movie doesn't appear to be an intentional rejection of the US jury system, merely set within the bounds of that system. The behavior of the jury members in the movie is also not indicative of how real juries are instructed to behave, though they are given pretty broad leeway (within limits) to make decisions how they see fit. I don't think ...


24

Richard has done a great job of explaining that it is more than one cut but I'd like to add why. The fact is that, even today, it's pretty much impossible to make a feature-length film in one cut... even with digital recording. In the 50s, it was even more limited. All films were shot on actual film and filmmakers had to work around the limited length of ...


40

Assuming you're referring to the 1957 B&W version, the simplest answer is that the film was indeed unique (for the time) in consisting of some extremely long mobile sequences with a mounted camera. The initial scene with the jury introduction, for example is nearly 10 minutes long and involves no less than 30-40 different conversations in the foreground ...


8

In the US legal system, as with many others around the world, a jury is selected from the general population of registered voters by random ballot. During the initial trial phase, known as "jury selection" both legal teams (defence and prosecution) have the right to question and then remove certain members of the jury. It's common that anyone with a genuine ...



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