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Revolver. Though, An amazing movie regarding EGO, EGO and EGO...

At most times, the movie included actual animations of Andre, Liotta and several other characters. Like - when the money was stolen, Macha, Lord John, all were in cartoons. Why was such a theme introduced at that time?

Was that simply to cover the actual guns and blood used by the fellas? If not, why then?

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2 Answers 2

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Although many viewers felt like it was ripping off (or homaging?) the origin of O-Ren Ishii seen in Kill Bill Vol.1 (released two years earlier), other critics have alluded to the notion that the animation technique was used to illustrate a specific moment of 'non-reality'.

Indeed, a comment made on the Film Geek Show blog suggests:

This was to give you hints that what Jake was seeing were not only not real but also what elements of Jake's subconsciousness they were.

I would also add that the type of animation used - the rotoscoped variety favored by Richard Linklater in A Scanner Darkly which was all about augmented reality - served as an indicator to the viewer that this was unreal or dreamed.

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From an interview with director Guy Ritchie:

There's a lot of stylistic choices in Revolver, such as the animated scene. What's the idea behind them?

  • It's funny, because I wrote it before 'Kill Bill' came out so I really wanted to have a whole animated sequence in the thing and fucking 'Kill Bill' came out and people went "oh, he's just copying Tarantino.

    So I always wanted to integrate somehow, an animated sequence. I was always interested in 3-D/2-D. So it's the old 2-D fashion, but in 3-D. In fact, I wanted to make a movie like it so it got in there.

    Actually, it was about - well, there's the simple version and there's the complicated version - let's stick with the simple one. The simple one is that I just wanted to use animation in the movie.


But you think that it ties into the film's theme?

  • Well it does. That's the complicated version. The complicated version is about, sort of dual universes, parallel universes and whatnot.
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