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3-D films are becoming more and more common. While I find the experience interesting, I have yet to find "the best seat in the house". Opticaly, there ought to be a optimal viewing area where the visual experience is better than anywhere else. Where, from the film editors point of view, is the optimal place to sit in order to get the best visual effects when viewing a 3-D film? Is there such an area?

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Why are you specifically asking for the film editors point of view? –  Oliver_C Dec 16 '12 at 11:04
    
@Oliver_C I asked it that way because the film editor is tasked with presenting the movie in the best way possible. I figured the editor would be targeting the best place to watch the film from. I suppose asking just where the director sits while screening a 3-D film would have also have worked. –  Major Stackings Dec 16 '12 at 16:17
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Major S, I would suggest that the focal point in any given shot is not determined by the editor, but by the director of photography and the director. In many instances the DP works in conjunction with the gaffer to light the scene so that the focal point (be it a character or object) is highlighted in accordance to the director's wishes.

This set-up carries through to 3D filming whereby specific elements in the frame can be enhanced or reduced in value in order to make the focal point 'pop'.

This is not carried out by the editor, but is a post-production process handled by the post houses, color timers, compositors et al.

As for an optimum position in the theater, in theory you are supposed to get a great 3D experience from any position in the house (except maybe in the first few rows, but then I know folks who love those seats...), but from personal experience it is always 'middle/middle' for the best in picture and especially sound which, at the end of the day, is 50% of the viewing experience any way.

For the record, any director I have ever known sits at the back of the auditorium during screenings and judges everyone else's reactions. By that point they are usually sick of watching their own film ;)

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