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Jason Bourne is almost superhuman in terms of mental/physical skill, yet he manages to be shot on the back twice by a supposedly not-as-well-trained dictator. This is a guy who noticed that Bourne spared his life, so it doesn't make much sense that he proceeded to shoot him, or that he even managed such a feat. Is there some explanation that I missed, or is it a shortcut/oversight by the writers?

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I don't think it's a shortcut or oversight. Bourne's skills are depicted as superhuman, but even he can't dodge or outrun bullets fired at point blank range. If all had gone according to plan he would have killed the dictator and walked out. Once Bourne made the decision not to kill his target he was in an entirely different situation. Instead of walking away from a dead body, he was running away from someone who was armed, scared, angry, and alert.

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I imagine that if I was in the situation, I would not proceed to shoot an assassin after he spared my life. –  Tshepang Dec 31 '11 at 10:00
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@Tshepang I would probably hide under the carpet, weeping. But we are talking about the dictator of a country here, so we shouldn't expect his reaction to be typical. It probably wasn't the first attempt on his life, and it would send a strong message to his enemies if their assassin not only failed, but also wound up dead. –  Bill the Lizard Dec 31 '11 at 13:56
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What would have happened it that the dictator would have shot Bourne in the back and then released the story to the media of how he tackled and fought Bourne (after using himself as bait because Bourne's next job was to blow up an orphanage), over powered him and had to kill him because Bourne would not accept the mercy he was offered. –  Stefan Jul 3 '12 at 13:00
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