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What rules govern how TV show opening credits are structured?
In opening credits for TV shows, why does it say ‘with so and so’ for some actors?

In the credits of Seinfeld series I noticed that Jason Alexander is listed as 'Jason Alexander as George'. While others are listed with just their names and their character name is left out. "Jerry Seinfeld", "Julia Louis-Dreyfus", and "Michael Richards".

I Googled for 'Seinfeld credits Jason Alexander George' and found In the Seinfeld credits, why does it say "Jason Alexander as George" when no one else has as after their name? It says a lot of TV shows do that and may be it is because their name is last.

Still I find it odd. They could have gone with 'Michael Richards as Cosmo Kramer' and put Jason Alexander as third in the credits.

Is there any trivia that I'm missing on this?

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marked as duplicate by Bill the Lizard, Origin, wbogacz, Keen, Ankit Sharma Nov 2 '12 at 7:13

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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I believe this to be a near-duplicate of these two earlier questions: 1, and 2. Also, this seems to revive another site's questions into this site, which I do not advocate - though to tell the truth, I would not have known about that site's question without the hyperlink. –  wbogacz Nov 1 '12 at 15:10

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up vote 7 down vote accepted

From TV Tropes:

As a way to draw special attention to the last actor on the list, their name will often be bracketed with an additional annotation, such as "With", "And", or "And Starring".

Sometimes, this would be elaborated even further, giving the name of the character portrayed by the actor.

In the past, this was reserved for either the star of the show, a cast member who is not part of the "primary" ensemble, or a big name doing a cameo. Over time, as stars and their agents learned about the power of marketing, it has become an increasingly important bargaining point.

[...]

The credits of Seinfeld ended with "And Jason Alexander as George", as he had arguably the highest profile as an actor of the four principals.


Jason Alexander was on Broadway before doing Seinfeld, and in 1989 he won a Tony Award (Best Actor in a Musical ) for his perfomance in Jerome Robbins' Broadway.

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Thanks @Oliver_C, you seem to have answers for all my questions :) –  Senthil Kumar Nov 1 '12 at 18:29

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