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In almost every James Bond movie, there is always one girl who is called 'the Bond Girl'. However, in Skyfall, who is the Bond Girl? Is it Eve Moneypenny (portrayed by Naomie Harris), or Séverine (portrayed by Bérénice Lim Marlohe)?

A snippet from Wikipedia says:

There are female characters such as Judi Dench's M and Camille Montes, who are not romantic interests of Bond, and hence not strictly Bond girls. However, it has been argued that M's pivotal role in the plot of Skyfall qualifies her as a Bond girl or Bond woman.

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I think there wasn't any – Shevliaskovic Feb 29 at 13:54
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Every girl that is romantic interest of James Bond is considered as Bond Girl. For eg. Vesper Lynd in Casino Royale. In Skyfall, both Moneypenny and Severine are Bond's romantic interests. – A J Feb 29 at 13:57
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It's been a while since I last watched the movie, but if I'm not mistaken, there wasn't any girl that was like all the other Bond girls in the previous movies. Of course there were girls Bond was having romantic interests with. Anyways, I don't have anything to back this up with since I don't remember the movie that clearly – Shevliaskovic Feb 29 at 14:00
    
I think it was Severine – Kshitij Bhandari Feb 29 at 15:31
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bond girl in skyfall is Bérénice Marlohe – Pushkar Shetye Mar 1 at 6:29
up vote 20 down vote accepted

The biggest problem in answering this is understanding what is a Bond girl?

The wiki for "Bond girl" describes them as:

A Bond girl is a character (or the actress portraying a character) who is a love interest and/or female sidekick of James Bond in a novel, film, or video game

But again, what does this really mean?

In the reboot of the series, Vesper is a much more important love interest than any other character. In the "original" run of films, Teresa di Vicenzo is probably the most important, as she became his wife. They're both arguably more than just "bond girls".

However, how do we define his other love interests? Is it simply somebody Bond has slept with? Or somebody he has flirted with who has enough one on one screen time with Bond to provide a genuine potential for a romantic conquest?

If we side step these potential issues for a moment, there are four potential candidates in Skyfall:

"Bond's Lover" (Tonia Sotiropoulou)

The wiki identifies her as a bond girl, as do many news outlets. She does sleep with Bond and was involved in filming for five days.

However, she is a relatively tiny character in the film.

Séverine (Bérénice Marlohe)

Like "Bond's lover", she is identified as a Bond girl by a few news outlets as well as the wiki.

However, unlike "Bond's lover", she is an intrinsic part of the plot, as the femme fatale of the story. She has plenty of screen time, was used throughout the trailer and promotions for the film and seems the best "bet" for a Bond girl.

Eve Moneypenny

Moneypenny and Bond flirt throughout the film, with us only learning at the end that she is Moneypenny.

She certainly satisfies the screen time requirements for a Bond girl, and does flirt with Bond throughout. However, there is no actual sexual activity between them, which is usually a cornerstone of a Bond girl.

M

Whilst some have argued for M as a bond girl, I struggle to reconcile this. She is absolutely integral to the plot, which satisfies that requirement, but there is zero love interest in their relationship (instead, it is based on respect).

Although this relationship is fascinating, and is one of the cornerstones of the film, if she was the Bond girl she would be totally unique in the Bond world.

Conclusion

How do you define a Bond girl?

By standard definitions, Séverine seems the most likely, but there are arguments to be made for all four (and there is of course no limit to the number of Bond girls in a film).

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@OlivierGrégoire: Thank you for this. I took this from her character page as a copy and paste and never checked it. I've corrected the references now. – Andrew Martin Mar 1 at 10:27

Naomi Harris feels that she wasn't a "Bond girl" although she's not averse to calling herself a Bond-woman

Because your character’s an agent, do you consider yourself a Bond girl or is it a different category of “Woman in a Bond Film?”

Harris: Yeah, that’s interesting actually, that’s very interesting. I feel like a different category. I do, because she’s not there to wear slinky frocks and be sexy. She’s a capable woman out in the field. She’s not necessarily a match for Bond, as such, but her ambition is to be as skilled as him in the field. So I like the idea of it being a second category, yeah. - Collider Interview


Bérénice Marlohe, seems to have positively embraced the appelation, happily comparing herself with Bond girls from prior films

What did the notion of Bond girl mean to you before you were cast in “Skyfall” and what did it come to mean to you after playing one?

Bérénice Lim Marlohe: For me, when I thought about a Bond girl, what excited me is that mix of male attitude, power, danger, and a very glamorous, feminine figure or woman. And also, my point of view of that was to play with animals to create her because they are colorful, theatrical characters that are bigger than life, like any character in the Bond movies. I could sense that I would have a lot of freedom on set. And, after the experience, I was happy I could have in the script too those iconic scenes in the casino that you find a lot of times in the Bond movies. For me, they are very meaningful in the history of the James Bond movies so I was very happy to have a chance to get to be in one of them.

Naomie Harris: For me, I had very set ideas about what it meant to be a Bond girl. It’s about being sexy, being alluring, being beautiful, elegant, and that, for me, felt quite constraining because I don’t usually play roles like that. In fact, I don’t know what role I’ve played like that before, so I felt very confined and constricted by all those set ideals. But then, a friend of mine gave me a great piece of advice, which was just forget about all of that and imagine that you’re part of a low budget movie. You can do whatever you want with this role and just make it your own. And that, ultimately, is how I came to see Bond girls. I don’t think any more in terms of the Bond girl terminology. I think that we’re just women who are in Bond movies, and women now in Bond movies can be anything, so you’re totally free to create, and that’s what makes it an interesting role. - Moviesonline.ca interview


Tonia Sotiropoulou cheerfully identifies herself as a [Bond] Girl (03:25)

https://vimeo.com/54692344

"I have a very small part in the film. Basically the focus is a love scene between Bond and that girl"


Dame Judi Dench also refers to herself as a Bond-Woman in interviews and in her (auto)biography

I don’t think I realised at first what a huge responsibility I had in playing ‘M’, I was just really excited about it. Michael and Finty were mad about the idea too, Michael said, ‘Oh, brilliant – Bond-woman!’ The very first time that Pierce visited me at home, he stood in the doorway and said, ‘Hi, boss,’ and Finty did a very theatrical stagger back across the room. - And Furthermore

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Meh, girl? woman? Michelle Yeoh was a pretty badass super agent, too, and was a total equal to Bond, as was Halle Berry, still commonly referred to as Bond Girls. And if Miss Harris wants to admit it or not, she was deliberately sexy in that film. But I guess in the 21st century that term is simply frowned upon. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ But interesting answer of course, directly from the actresses themselves. – Napoleon Wilson Mar 1 at 13:19

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