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In Season 4 episode 6 Cornered, at one point, we see Skyler go the the border of four states and flip a coin. Upon seeing the coin land in one quadrant and looking frustrated, she then slides the coin to the quadrant in front of her and leaves.

What is the meaning of this scene? What is she doing out here? And what is the significance of flipping a coin at this place?

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i dont believe in fate and destiny, but it DOES sound like fate was tellin her to go to Colorado..... –  user4659 Apr 24 '13 at 13:24
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She was planning on fleeing, and was using the Four Corners as a way to pick where to run to. Whichever state the coin landed in, she would flee to. However, fate refused to conspire with her, and kept putting the coin in a state she really didn't want to go to.

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IMO, Skyler was looking for a reason to stay back. A reason not to flee from this madness. Even though probably every fiber of her being told her to do so. When the entire situation was suggesting her to make a move, she came to the Four Corners expecting the "Universe" to indicate in some manner that she should stay back with her family and not run from them.

So, she tosses the coin and lets the "Universe" decide(even though it was more like her asking fate to support her decision). But when both the tosses land up in Colarado, she steels her will and pulls the coin back to New Mexico.

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The purpose was to show that Skyler chose to be involved and made a deliberate choice even after she was "told" to leave. This most likely will be important as we see the consequences of her decision in the final episode.

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