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Bane appears to be an incredibly effective leader, commanding dozens or perhaps even hundreds of criminal underlings in a successful campaign to capture Gotham and hold the entire city hostage for five months.

But I am confused about Bane's leadership style:

  • In the opening plane scene, Bane uses the term "brother" affectionately as he orders one of the guys with him to die in the crash. The guy does not hesitate to accept and indeed appears to be honored to help "start the fire" with his death -- giving the audience the impression that Bane is a powerfully beloved leader with dedicated followers who will do anything for him.

  • Later, in a sewer scene, Bane seems to run things more like Darth Vader, occasionally killing his minions when he is not pleased with them -- a character trait that would seem to inspire a different type of obedience than that conveyed in the plane scene.

  • In another early scene, a street kid says that there are employment opportunities in the sewers, suggesting Bane was paying at least some of his minions for their efforts.

So how exactly did Bane so impressively motivate his people as he carried out his dastardly plan? Did Bane motivate his minions through love? Through fear? Through money? Or all of the above?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 31 down vote accepted

I actually think he had three "levels" of minions.

  • League of Shadows members. These are the ones that are willing to lay down their lives for him and "the cause"
  • Thugs. Disposable minions that he may pay to do things that he may not want directly tied to the League (guys running the cement trucks, the one that he shot, etc.)
  • Street urchins. These are the homeless people that he was paying to do work underground. This group probably didn't have any overview of Bane's plans and were highly disposable if they discovered anything.
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Good points. I up-voted and I'm leading toward accepting. During the opening scene, I got the impression that Bane somehow inspired a do-anything-for-him loyalty, but maybe that loyalty only applied to a few close minions. Which makes it all the more impressive that Bane managed everyone so smoothly throughout the 5-month occupation. –  Shiz Z. Jul 31 '12 at 22:06

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