Take the 2-minute tour ×
Movies & TV Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for movie and tv enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In Season 1, Episode 7, there is funny, heart-warming bar scene between McNulty and Bunk.

They're both drunk and McNulty's laying on all kinds of compliments. Then he closes with "you know why I respect you so much, Bunk?....It's because when it came time for you to fuck me, you were very gentle."

enter image description here

What is this conversation referring too?

share|improve this question
5  
+1 This site needs more questions about The Wire. Lovelovelove it. Time to rewatch the whole series so I can answer! Sheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeit –  stevvve Jun 29 '12 at 20:18
    
@stevvve I just started watching it b/c a friend recommended; don't know how I went so long w/o this show popping up on my radar. Seven episodes in and I am hooked! –  ray023 Jun 30 '12 at 0:19
    
Wikipedia claims "The scene in the bar in which McNulty tells Bunk why he respects him, recounting quite explicitly a metaphorical homosexual encounter they had, was previously in the book Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets." Can anybody pin down that scene in the book? –  Martin Schröder Nov 18 '12 at 14:32
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's the scene: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZekrhML4frI

I understood this as two very drunk friends basically talking rubbish to each other. Bunk explains how screwed McNulty is (professionally) and rather than say 'yeah thanks for the advice' or 'you are right', he just starts talking rubbish at him, winding him up. And Bunk takes the lead and runs with it - "I knew it was your first time..."

In common with much of The Wire, this is two real guys having a conversation (in this case, a drunken one), not directly moving the plot forward.

Now, having said that, it perhaps does relate to some incident in particular, or perhaps just in general - you'd expect two guys who work together in that environment at some point to have a disagreement. But it doesn't necessarily mean it was something that occurred or was referred to in a previous episode.

What I mean is this is good writing and a great show - soak it up!

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.