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In Phantoms (1998) the "ancient evil" has one of it's drones provide a biological sample to Dr Flyte. It came out looking like maggots and then turned into a Gecko for a brief moment and then turned back into guck. Flyte was told to study it.

The team does just that, they study the sample and find it's similar to petroleum and come up with a way to destroy the creature.

Why did the ancient evil want Flyte to study it? What was the purpose? We know that it wanted Flyte to "write the gospel" but what does the sample have to do with that?

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The Ancient Enemy wanted the people to know about it, as you said it wanted Flyte to "write the gospel". It thought itself to be superior than anything else and it actually wanted nothing else than boast with its supposed superiority. So in order for the people to fully see and admire/fear the majesty of the Ancient Enemy they had to fully understand it. Thus it wanted Flyte to understand its structure.

And in fact this supposed superiority and arrogance is what led to the Ancient Enemy's downfall and what Flyte and the others used to trick it into getting a sample at all. It couldn't ever imagine that the puny humans could be able to somehow defeat it. It thus freely gave a sample to Flyte for understanding it and making the world understand it, not anticipating in any way that this information could be used to defeat it.

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Fully understanding it was what I was thinking too. –  DustinDavis Jul 6 at 21:19
    
I just thought of something, if the ancient evil was like the flat worms as Flyte described, then shouldn't it have known the humans were capable of defeating it with their technology? –  DustinDavis Jul 6 at 22:46
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@DustinDavis Hmm, maybe. But I guess if one goes down too deep with this, the Ancient Enemy shouldn't have been as dumb as it acted. But I still think it all comes down to mere arrogance and hubris. At least that is what the movie tells us, anything beyond that is just a minor plot-hole, I guess. –  Napoleon Wilson Jul 6 at 22:55

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