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American Hustle (2013)

There's some gentlemen sitting over there at the bar. That's 130 years sitting right there. That's how much time between them. They run the biggest casinos in the United States.

What did he mean by 130 years? The time they spent in prison combined?

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It's a phrase which I personally dislike when used (often used in the automotive industry), which means collective experience. It's supposed to be statement to proclaim experience, wisdom, knowledge. 20 years between them = Joe 6 years + Jerry 7 years + John 7 years = 20 collective years. –  DustinDavis Apr 25 at 14:44
    
I also think it's a marketing ploy and dislike it. If I gather 25 people with 2 years experience at something, that doesn't equal "50 years of experience". –  JohnP Apr 25 at 15:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It's most likely a reference to the men's collective years as "made" in the mafia, or even just their experience as casino owners.

The script identifies this group as "five men in suits, 40 to 60, slightly mob-looking". 130 years of prison time between five mobsters would be about 25 years each, typically the maximum sentence before a life sentence, and typically reserved for 1st degree murder or rare cases of racketeering and corruption under the RICO act which, being passed in 1970, would not have been applicable to such men in their youth. Furthermore, it's unlikely that a group of convicted felons who served 25 years each could congregate in public without raising suspicion, let alone inherit casinos -- and they would have to inherit them, as the majority of their adult lives would have been spent in prison, preventing them from cultivating their business.

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