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In the pilot episode of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, I remember there were aliens who had no sense of time. (It was a long time ago; forgive me if I get some details wrong!) I remember the commander trying to explain baseball to them:

the ball is pitched

the spectators don't know if the batter will hit it

if the batter does hit it, nobody in the stands or on the field knows what direction it will go

etc.

And that's why it's nice to have a sense of time and to not know what's going to happen. HOWEVER ... if the aliens really don't have time, and know everything, they could NOT HAVE THIS CONVERSATION. At the start of the conversation, they don't know a couple things. (Baseball & time.) During the conversation they learn about those things. If they were truly immune to time, and could travel to the past and the future and stuff, they would already know the baseball analogy and would already know the result of the conversation.

Your thoughts? Explanations? (Bad jokes?)

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Kurt Vonnegut's "Slaughterhouse Five" has aliens from Tralfamadore who see all points in time simultaneously. When the protagonist asks them how the universe will end they tell him "We blow it up, experimenting with new fuels for our flying saucers. A Tralfamadorian test pilot presses a starter button, and the whole Universe disappears." –  Will Feldman Feb 14 at 0:21
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During the conversation they learn about those things. - Perhaps they learned everything throughout time the at the instance when Sisko entered the wormhole. But what we are just seeing depicted in the way that the humans perceived them instead of how it was learned/perceived by the wormhole aliens. –  Zoredache Feb 14 at 20:38
    
@Zoredache Oo! Cool! –  BrettFromLA Feb 14 at 23:28
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I think it was said the aliens had no sense of linear time, which isn't necessarily the same as no sense of time. - Us not being restricted in our 3 dimensional movement doesn't mean we have been everywhere, or are everwhere, or know things about everywhere. - So in a similar way it might be possible that aliens who can move freely in time don't necessarily know everything that ever happened. To find out they would have to "go there". –  Oliver_C Feb 18 at 14:25
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2 Answers

Maybe we should move this to scifi.stackexchange.com

First of all the idea that time is different for wormhole-beings makes some sense: modern physics theoretically allows wormholes to connect different places in space-time, so one end can be in the past, one in the future.

Now, here's my interpretation: The wormhole-beings dont know that they didn't know. They have actually a worse perception of time than we have. Imagine their brains like a computer into which you store facts but dont record the time at which the fact was added, also it can not form memories of its own. At every point in time it seems to it as if it had always known.

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Wow, that's trippy! Up-vote for an intelligent, creative answer. –  BrettFromLA Feb 14 at 23:27
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Nice Answer. It kind of reminds me of Flatland. But instead of being about a two dimensioned entity learning about a 3D world, it is about difference in time perception. –  Zoredache Feb 15 at 0:28
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@Zoredache ... Some claim time to be the fourth dimension. With that in mind, this would be just like Flatland, only with the Third dimensional people trying to understand the fourth (a lower order trying to understand the next higher order). Yes, very trippy. –  Paulster2 Feb 15 at 3:05
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You hit the paradox on the head.

To beings that exist outside of 3 dimensions (and assuming time is the next dimension) any interaction is already both presumed to occur and presumed to not occur.

Reality for us is still based in 3 dimensions with time constantly moving forward. Our reaction is like the batter and spectators from our perspective...we see and calculate strike or hit and if hit to where.

To a being not set in our perception of time, there is an infinite number of ways the bat will miss the ball (including not being pitched and the reason if it is pitched), and if struck an infinite number of ways the ball will travel.

But in talking to the "timeless aliens" we have changed things for us. Our reality includes the discussion, so regardless if they exist in multiple possibilities, our reality is that "the ball was pitched."

A simpler version is, assuming we asked, did they respond, what does that response mean?

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