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After watching quite a few episodes of CSI:Crime Scene Investigation I get the feeling that all crimes are solved. Is there any episodes where they actually fail in doing this?

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There are three different series: CSI:NY, CSI:LV and CSI:Miami (and only a few episodes in which the teams from each area cross over) so you may have to be a bit more specific –  phwd Mar 19 '12 at 21:09
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@phwd CSI:LV is actually just called CSI:Crime Scene Investigation –  AlasdairCM Mar 19 '12 at 21:24
    
Updated question to reflect that I mean CSI:Crime Scene Investigation –  jontro Mar 20 '12 at 9:51
    
I know in one of the series, the don't solve one of the crimes for several episodes. It's a serial killer, and It takes a few kills, and a few episodes to solve it, but the do solve it in the end. I can dig out the series & episode numbers but would that count as an answer? –  AidanO Mar 20 '12 at 15:46

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Most of the crimes on CSI are wrapped up neatly by the end of a single episode. They also have longer story arcs that take anywhere from two or three episodes to an entire season to solve. The Blue Paint Killer, Miniature Killer, Dick and Jane Killer, and Dr. Jekyll story arcs are all examples of cases that take several episodes for the CSI team to solve. The pilot episode of the series also introduces a case that isn't solved until season two.

Very rarely there are cases that just go completely unsolved. One example is Sqweegel, which is based on a character from CSI creator Anthony Zuiker's series of Level 26 novels. Sqweegel was responsible for a series of attacks in one episode in season 11, but so far hasn't shown up again.

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