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In films where there are some treasure hunting like in Indiana Jones, National Treasure; we can see that some time actors went to old temples, caves etc. There are spider webs all over the places. Now I don't think directors and film-crew will like to do shooting in real old places. I think they create props and set for shooting.

So how do they make spider web? I'm not talking about Spiderman's web.

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

There could be various methods, a few are:

  • As @Meat Trademark said fake spider webs can be made out of cotton. Here is a good video to demonstrate it.

  • Another faster method using rubber cement is described here.

  • Another method is by using hot glue.

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Good job. +1 I don't usually vote against myself. –  Meat Trademark Jan 1 at 17:02
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It's often just cotton. Next October go to a Halloween supply store. There you will find finely woven clumps of cotton that, when stretched out, resemble webs. It's a common stock item. While a simple prop, it's highly effective and does not stick to you, meaning it can stay where taped / glued until you take it down.

Have you ever pulled a cotton swab apart or pulled on the end of a Q-Tip? Same principle.

(I'll add that one Halloween I spayed hair-spray on the cotton web and it was more realistic and stuck to you kind of like real webs.)

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I don't have any Halloween store in my locality. Though thanks for the example to make it clear. –  tintinmj Jan 1 at 12:10
    
Most grocery stores and pharmacies (Walgreens, CVS, etc) have a Halloween section or aisle in October. Same thing. They sell cotton at a huge mark-up touting it can be used to make fake webs. –  Meat Trademark Jan 1 at 12:13
    
I didn't notice where you lived. The comment above is very North America-centric. My apologies. Still, though, finely woven cotton stretched out is one of the more common ways the effect is created. –  Meat Trademark Jan 1 at 12:34
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