Take the 2-minute tour ×
Movies & TV Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for movie and tv enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Surely the character knows this will happen through her training. Why wouldn't the hatch have a better mechanism such that astronauts do not run the risk of flying into space.

share|improve this question
4  
It wouldn't be normal to open the hatch when the enclosed space was pressurized, it would be normal to depressurize the space in a controlled way before opening the hatch. –  iandotkelly Dec 31 '13 at 23:23
    
In an emergency situation the hatch is openable from the outside, so why design it to blow out? –  P399 Jan 1 at 0:13
4  
Its an emergency - how can you prevent the force from the pressure contained? Either you allow external controls to vent the pressure before opening (either these don't exist or they were not used) or the hatch will open with some force. –  iandotkelly Jan 1 at 6:04

2 Answers 2

Surely the character knows this will happen through her training.

Of course she knows it will happen. There is (possibly) pressure on the inside and certainly none at the outside: it is physics basics, no training needed.

But I doubt that Ryan Stone's training dealt with this kind of an emergency situation. She has had six months of training according to the dialogue in the movie. I am no expert, but six months sounds rather minimal to me. It could be enough though, considering she is "just" a scientist added to the crew to install/setup some hardware. The emergency training for this kind of debris catastrophe, if at all, would be for the commander, the captain and mission control.

Why wouldn't the hatch have a better mechanism such that astronauts do not run the risk of flying into space.

There is no need to: There is no risk if Ryan would have secured herself with the carabiner hook (as she did when she unscrewed the connectors between the ISS and the ship), and/or if she would not have been on top of the hatch but in front of it instead. But both times she was in respiratory distress and simply did not think of it in the panic.

share|improve this answer

The technology in "Gravity" was largely (but not exclusively) based on real-world technology. The film featured consultants from NASA, former astronauts as well as shuttle and space engineers.

The short answer for why the capsule in Gravity uses an explosive hatch is simply because that's what is used in reality.

http://youtu.be/dfVTX25hH-I?t=28s

share|improve this answer
    
The question isn't about explosive hatches, but about hinged hatches. –  NGLN May 24 at 14:48
    
@ngln - Er, that's what happens when you violently depressurise a spaceship with a hinged door. –  Richard May 24 at 15:02
    
The hinged door may have explosive bolts, but they do not explode. The door just swings open, although real hard. Remember that she closes the doors afterwards. The question is about the situation with an astronaut on the outside, while you answer for a situation with an astronaut on the inside. –  NGLN May 24 at 15:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.