Take the 2-minute tour ×
Movies & TV Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for movie and tv enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

While I was watching James Bond 007 - Goldfinger on TV, I remember a lesson I had back in high school. We were learning about how movies are affected/released by what is going on in society. We looked at Dr. Strange Love and James Bond 007 - Goldfinger. I'm quite sure we were supposed to note the notations to nuclear weaponry, however in Goldfinger everyone just laughed their asses off when Pussy Galore's name was brought up.

Now, I may be trying to keep both my physical and mental virginity until I get a girlfriend, but I know what everyone was going on about with Pussy Galore (and personally I don't find it funny, I saw the film several times before the class and never found it funny). I know that the James Bond films are based off books which were out long before the movies were released. I've been wondering, was Pussy Galore's name really a take on the slag term currently used in porn or was there another reason why Pussy Galore was named this way?

NOTE: While the answer probably lies in the book rather than the film's development, there's no SE site for books (at least not named easily enough) and this curiosity has came from watching the film, not to mention I do not know how different the movie is to the book so there is a chance that Pussy goes under a different name in the book.

share|improve this question
    
There was a Literature.SE site, but unfortunately it closed after seeing low adoption during the beta. area51.stackexchange.com/proposals/6426/literature –  Avner Shahar-Kashtan Nov 7 '13 at 7:55
    
What about miss Plenty O'Toole in Diamonds Are Forever? I thought that was a funny, suggestive name as well –  user7756 Jan 24 at 21:43

7 Answers 7

up vote 14 down vote accepted

It seems the women in James Bond's love life often have provocative names:

  • Honey Rider, Dr. No (1961): 1960s sexual position name for reverse cowgirl
  • Domino Vitali/Petachi, Thunderball (1965) and Never Say Never Again (1983): Dominatrix?
  • Kissy Suzuki, You Only Live Twice (1967): "kissing machine"?
  • Tiffany Case, Diamonds Are Forever (1971): beautiful outside, desirable inside
  • Dr. Holly Goodhead, Moonraker (1979): certainly a euphemism for holy fellatio
  • Judy Havelock, For Your Eyes Only (1981): bondage term or wrestling lock
  • Octopussy, Octopussy (1983): (what can I say?)
  • Xenia Onatopp, Goldeneye (1995): none too subtle
  • Wai Lin, Tommorrow Never Dies (1997): sounds like Way In or Whaling, both implying forceful sex

I'm having trouble deciphering Vesper Lynd (from several Casino Royale movies). Vesper means evening, but I don't see how that provocatively fits with Lynd.

As for what they all mean: maybe Bond can't be relied upon to independently identify his next sexual conquest, so they are named as though they have signs on them.

Or maybe Ian Fleming was poking fun at English society's prudish and contradictory morals.

share|improve this answer
3  
You missed Dr Goodhead from Moonraker. –  Tom77 Nov 8 '13 at 10:43
    
@Tom77: I added it. How could I have forgotten her? :-) –  wallyk Nov 8 '13 at 19:35
4  
So what does "Pussy Galore" mean? :) –  coleopterist Nov 11 '13 at 2:37
    
I remember reading that Vesper Lynd was a (innuendo-less, for once) wordplay on “West Berlin”. –  DaG May 1 at 20:24
1  
@MrLore: Wasn't there also a quip like Christmas only comes once a year? –  wallyk May 31 at 15:09

There is also a Wikipedia entry on the character, which explains the meaning and origin:

As with many of Ian Fleming's creations, the name is a double entendre—in this case with respect to pussy, which is both another word for a housecat and a slang term for vulva and vagina, while galore means an abundant or plentiful supply of something.

share|improve this answer

The meaning of the name "Pussy Galore" is essentially "abundant sex" (with "Pussy" meaning sex and "Galore" meaning abundant).

The name "Pussy Galore" is intended to make viewers laugh. The humor is largely driven by how the name is such an obvious, crude reference to sex.

Remember the movie came out in 1964, when audiences were much less de-sensitized to sex and to shock-humor than they are today. Also note that the most recent Bond films seem to have done away with the obvious-sex-reference names for Bond Girls -- probably because that stuff just isn't funny to enough people anymore, and might even be considered offensive by many.

share|improve this answer

That's really a question only Ian Fleming can answer, but he did use double entendres quite often when naming his female characters. In this case the double entendre is (hidden because it's not polite conversation):

a housecat and vulva.

share|improve this answer
5  
In this case the double entendre is a housecat and vulva.... I can't believe you actually typed that out, man. –  John Smith Optional Nov 7 '13 at 2:31
3  
just answering the question... –  Ben Plont Nov 7 '13 at 5:30
1  
@JohnSmithOptional, there you go, now you have to want to read it... –  Ben Plont Nov 7 '13 at 5:39
5  
"hidden because it's not polite conversation" - What is impolite in an anatomical term? But nevermind, to each his own. ;-) –  Napoleon Wilson Nov 7 '13 at 9:48
2  
Down-vote because "Pussy Galore" is not a double entendre -- and I guarantee Ian Fleming did not have "housecat" in mind :) –  Shiz Z. Nov 9 '13 at 0:21

It's an obvious sexual innuendo ("pussy" is probably the most-often used slang term for "vagina", and if you don't know what "galore" means then you need a dictionary), which was spoofed in the Austin Powers movies (Alotta Fagina).

share|improve this answer
1  
What are you using as your basis of fact ... ? I'm not asking you what is "obvious" but what you can prove. –  Paulster2 Feb 19 at 23:08
1  
We know that, the question is more WHY? What's the meaning? –  Meat Trademark Feb 20 at 10:35
    
Why does it have to have meaning? Can't it just be a provocative name? –  Johnny Bones Feb 20 at 16:19
    
@JohnnyBones It just seems that the asker didn't get the provocative name at all. So explaining it would make this answer an actual answer (well, in fact like all the other previously existing answers already did to great lengths). After all this answer seems like a comment as the only actual information it adds is the Austin Powers reference. –  Napoleon Wilson Apr 4 at 19:08
1  
I suspect the downvotes are because the answer is not new - there are several answers already stating the obvious sexual innuendo. –  iandotkelly May 4 at 20:36

Miss Pussy Galore was suposed to be a Lesbian . With that in mind, She Is surely a Pussy Galore. Abundant Pleasure but yet unbroken. Until 007 came. She turned as an ally to 007,after being detained by Goldfinger. Some eventful night on the detaining room must've open Pussy's perspective on having a good time with a male counterpart... Maybe mr.Fleming had 0069 in mind (?)

share|improve this answer
3  
Huh???????????? –  System Down Apr 4 at 20:51

The word "Galore" comes from the Irish term "Go Leoir" meaning plenty.

share|improve this answer
1  
Why does it always follow the noun it modifies? Is that a Gaelic practice? –  Malvolio Apr 15 at 0:37
    
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. –  user221287 Apr 25 at 15:52

protected by Community May 1 at 17:37

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.