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In "Live and Let Die", after Bond throws Tee Hee Johnson from the train window at the very end of the movie, and returns to Solitair, we see an image of smiling Baron Samedi sitting on the train engine:

enter image description here

... despite the fact that in an earlier scene, Bond killed Samedi by kicking him into a coffin full of snakes.

Wikipedia has this to say on the topic:

Later on, Bond witnesses Baron Samedi rising from a grave, and shoots him in the forehead; however, it is revealed to be nothing more than an animatronic dummy. Only minutes later, however, the real Samedi rises from the grave and engages Bond in a machete fight. Bond kills him again by pushing him into a coffin full of snakes. But just before the end credits roll, Samedi is seen riding on the front of Bond and Solitaire's speeding train (laughing), suggesting that he either survived falling into the coffin of snakes or that he was not mortal to begin with - that he really is "the man who cannot die". Because of this, he is probably the only James Bond 007 character to take on a supernatural basis rather than reality itself.

Question:

Was there ever any clarification on the point of this shot from someone involved with the movie (as opposed to pure guessing in Wikipedia)? Was Samedi merely not killed by snakes, or were the creators intentionally showing him to be immortal/supernatural?

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Well, whereas I can understand your curiosity, I don't think one should overinterpret such little gimmick scenes (whose only intention is to put a smile on the audience's face) too much, especially in the overly slapstick-heavy Moore-Bonds. –  Sonny Burnett Feb 25 '12 at 17:35
    
You're right - the info I found wasn't up to par so I'll just place it in here for further edification: –  Nobby Feb 25 '12 at 22:17
    
The character of Baron Samedi is actually based on a voodoo deity rather than a real person, and one might suppose that this would account for his otherworldly powers. It should also be noted that he is not a strictly 'villainous' character - the baron is relatively neutral in his meddling with the affairs of the living, and so does not need to die (as befits Bond baddies in general). There were also rumors that the Baron would be returning in one of the following films- but these rumors are uncorroborated. –  Nobby Feb 25 '12 at 22:20
    
Anyone else wish that Baron would return instead of Moore? :))) –  DVK Feb 25 '12 at 22:28

3 Answers 3

Live and Let Die is generally regarded as the one and only 'supernatural' entry in the Bond franchise, and this would go some way to explaining Baron Samedi's apparent indestructibility.

The character of Baron Samedi is actually based on a voodoo deity rather than a real person, and one might suppose that this would account for his otherworldly powers. It should also be noted that he is not a strictly 'villainous' character - the baron is relatively neutral in his meddling with the affairs of the living, and so does not need to die (as befits Bond baddies in general).

There were also rumors that the Baron would be returning in one of the following films- but these rumors are uncorroborated.

*All information condensed from various articles from the James Bond wiki and IMDb

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while a good answer in itself, I'm sorry but it is 100% not helpful to what I asked. I know very well the cultural origins of Baron Samedi, and read both wiki and IMDb before posting (without learning anything new). I explicitly asked for information sourced from the people involved in making the movie –  DVK Feb 25 '12 at 19:22

The creators were intentionally showing him to be immortal/supernatural. The character was based on the Voodoo (Vodou) legend of Baron Samedi, who is one of the Guédé, a loa of the dead. Baron Samendi is the head of the family of ancestral loa and embodies the powers of death and fertility. He is the ultimate suave and sophisticated Vodou Spirit of Death.

Depending on the tradition followed, Baron Samedi is:

1.One of the Guédé

2.Their spiritual protector, who has raised them from the dead with the help of Baron Samedi's woman, Maman Brigitte.

3.An aspect of the Guédé gods.

In any of these configurations, Baron, Maman Brigitte, and the Guédé rule death, the cemetery and the grave. He is a supernatural being.

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The ending of the film, with Baron Samendi on the train, was meant to be ambiguous. Partly because the character himself was so ambiguous.

Earlier in the movie, Bond shoots a Samendi in the head, where that Samendi's eyes roll up as if to inspect the damage. Bond then shoots at that Samendi again, causing it to collapse as if it were just a porcelain mannequin. A few moments later, another Samendi pops up - it's this one that Bond physically fights with and knocks into the coffin filled with snakes.

So clearly, something metaphysical was going on, but what exactly was going on was never elaborated in the movie.

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thank, but this much is obvious, and pure speculation. I was asking for information sourced from people involved in the movie, not speculation, sorry. –  DVK Feb 27 '12 at 12:19

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